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MIPS Technology - Your guys take?

Feb. 20, 2017, 9:46 a.m.
Posts: 12871
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

This post ^^^ is the truth.

I am shaking my head about some of the comments in this thread. Only on the NSMB boards do you have people debating things like MIPS.

I was, and still am, curious so this is why I started the thread. It seems that only in the last few years scientists have come to acknowledge concussions as having an impact on a person's personality.

NSMB is, for me, a treasure trove of knowledge and good points, amid a lot of not so well-thought out replies I have to agree.

"You don't learn from experience. You learn from reflecting on the experience."
- Kristen Ulmer

Feb. 20, 2017, 1:24 p.m.
Posts: 333
Joined: Dec. 21, 2008

If you hit the ground hard enough the force of the impact will cause the helmet to stick to your head and ground which introduces the rotational forces to the brain.

Have you seen any credible data to back up this claim? I haven't. Other than that, I agree with the rest of your comments.

Feb. 20, 2017, 2:26 p.m.
Posts: 2344
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Yeah like others already said, those fit devices are unrelated to MIPS. I hear you about the Switchblade Rok-loc. Too large and too low. For me though extra pads that raise the helmet up a bit let it fit well.

there are helmets that use BOTH MIPS!!! and BOA!!! The Roc Loc dial serves a similar function as a BOA dial with fine adjustment and quick release .

Below is from a helmet manufactures description

As you'd expect from a premium helmet, the MIPS liner increases protection in the case of an angled impact. This low-friction liner allows the helmet to rotate independently around your head in the event of an oblique impact, dissipating traumatic rotational forces. Keeping it fresh after a long season, the XT2 lining actively wicks perspiration while combating odor build-up. Removable Bombshell Earpads not only block oncoming wind and snow, but also accommodate Outdoor Tech audio systems for seamless listening and call taking (audio not included).

A total of 22 vents are precisely controlled by dual sliders, which open and close the front and back vents independently. This gives you the ability to actively control airflow through rapidly changing alpine conditions, regardless if you're riding springtime slush or chasing cold-smoke powder. Wrapping your head precisely, the Boa FS360 fit system offers both forward and lateral adjustment that eliminates pressure points. Its micro-adjustable feel means you'll be able to fine-tune the helmet's fit to your liking.

Premium protection, stunning style, and comfort coalesce
Aerocore construction with Koroyd for ventilated protection
Exoskeleton zonal impact protection along the side panels
MIPS low-friction liner dissipates rotational impact forces
22 total vents with dual regulator climate control
XT2 lining provides wicks moisture and combats odor
Boa FS360 fit system with forward and lateral adjustment

#northsidetrailbuilders

Feb. 20, 2017, 3:37 p.m.
Posts: 549
Joined: Sept. 2, 2010

^ yep

And from a careful study of the thread title one may deduce that this is a thread about MIPS.

Maybe start another thread about your dislike of Boa or RocLoc or whatever?

Any thoughts on MIPS other than sometimes they put it in helmets which also have dials?

Feb. 20, 2017, 5:31 p.m.
Posts: 5731
Joined: June 24, 2003

Have you seen any credible data to back up this claim? I haven't. Other than that, I agree with the rest of your comments.

No data. That's just what I've read about MIPS and other design features that are intended to mitigate rotational shearing forces to the brain. My comment was intended to indicate that wiggling a helmet around your head is a hell of lot different then smacking the ground. I did rip a roc lok out of a Giro helmet once when I went over the bars and hit forehead first. There were dents on the front of the helmet and the rear Roc lok attachment had ripped out of the EPS. I think the Roc lok stuck to my head while the helmet rotated forward from impact. But who knows.

There have been articles written about newer football helmets that incorporate some form of MIPS like design. I'll each for it.

Debate? Bikes are made for riding not pushing.

Feb. 20, 2017, 5:58 p.m.
Posts: 5731
Joined: June 24, 2003

http://www.mipsprotection.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Halldin2001.pdf

Might be MIPS propaganda but suggests a 30% reduction in rotational forces for a motorcycle helmet.

Debate? Bikes are made for riding not pushing.

Feb. 21, 2017, 4:05 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: April 14, 2011

I got the new Giro Chronicle helmet a few months back - a proper "MIPS" helmet with shell sizing and design based on MIPS. I tried another Giro with a MIPS put into an existing shell, and it was too small - I've heard the retrofit helmets lose 3cm in diameter to non MIPS.

No idea if the MIPS in the Chronicle is good, hopefully never have to find out. I do know its extremely comfortable and feels like the plushness common to Troy Lee.

June 6, 2017, 2:38 a.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: June 6, 2017

I've come off multiple times on my road bike onto both MIPS and non-MIPS helmet's and I'm sold on it.

Without MIPS, landing on my head, or even glancing the edge of the helmet (yup, roadies don't wear chinbars!) meant feeling dizzy and disorientated on getting up - not quite concussion, but it really isn't nice.

The last crash I had (thankfully a while ago now), I landed full-on on the edge of my helmet (and a little on my chin - again, we don't get chinbars...) - this was hard enough to completely crack through one of the main beams of the helmet and smash up a good proportion of the side. Getting up from it, however, I didn't have the slight dizziness/disorientation feeling - sure, it doesn't eliminate shock, but in my experience it sure does something.

Whatever the science of it, in my experience it works well - safe to say I went out and bought an identical helmet the same day.

It may not be completely proven, it might be a bit more expensive... but it isn't any extra hassle (not like a neck brace), it doesn't hurt you, and MTB helmets suffer on the ventilation side anyways.

June 6, 2017, 2:52 p.m.
Posts: 2268
Joined: Nov. 22, 2002

Posted by: hampstead_bandit

I got the new Giro Chronicle helmet a few months back - a proper "MIPS" helmet with shell sizing and design based on MIPS. I tried another Giro with a MIPS put into an existing shell, and it was too small - I've heard the retrofit helmets lose 3cm in diameter to non MIPS.

This is a good point that some may not be aware of: when MIPS was 'tipping' into the market (going from 2-3 manufacturers offering it to almost everyone, just about overnight), several companies jammed it into existing helmets. They hadn't yet had time to create new molds and models yet. Consequently, fit suffered. The first Bell Super was an example of this issue, but there were others as well. Newer versions of helmets like the Super have a revised shell and are designed specifically to accommodate MIPS. So if you had a problem with a MIPS'd version of your fave lid in the past, it may have been rectified by now. We'll have a Bell Super 3 review in about a month or so, incidentally.

I've worn quite a few MIPS helmets now and recently had two crashes in one made by Sweet Protection. Only one of those two crashes may have involved rotational forces, but when push comes to shove, I'd rather have that precaution built into my helmet, than not. We'll be digging more into the issue over time, but for so many helmet manufacturers to have finally adopted it, I think it's fair to say there's more to it than marketing. Yes, there is also marketing going on there, but the MIPS premium has come down in price, so the real question is: "are you skeptical enough about it that you'd rather not pay an extra $40 US or so to find out?"

June 6, 2017, 3 p.m.
Posts: 188
Joined: March 14, 2017

whatever Kali uses...  safest helmets in MTB.

June 7, 2017, 10:13 a.m.
Posts: 1608
Joined: April 25, 2003

I've shelled out the extra dough for a MIPS helmet, picked up the top-end Smith helmet. First helmet I've tried that fits me as well as a Giro, but I could never stop the thing from bouncing around on my head. It always seemed like it was the outer shell moving, CRANKING down the "RocLoc" (or whatever Smith calls their version) helped, but it didn't eliminate the shake, only seemed to reduce how much the shake actually moved the helmets position on my head. And cranking on it ain't exactly comfy. 

Anyone else had this problem?  Seems like it might just be inherent in this type of system? Gentle trails and road riding was alright, but rough stuff, particularly with a light on, were terrible. Do other helmet models with MIPS do this?

June 7, 2017, 10:55 a.m.
Posts: 1595
Joined: July 11, 2014

Posted by: tashi

I've shelled out the extra dough for a MIPS helmet, picked up the top-end Smith helmet. First helmet I've tried that fits me as well as a Giro, but I could never stop the thing from bouncing around on my head. It always seemed like it was the outer shell moving, CRANKING down the "RocLoc" (or whatever Smith calls their version) helped, but it didn't eliminate the shake, only seemed to reduce how much the shake actually moved the helmets position on my head. And cranking on it ain't exactly comfy. 

Anyone else had this problem?  Seems like it might just be inherent in this type of system? Gentle trails and road riding was alright, but rough stuff, particularly with a light on, were terrible. Do other helmet models with MIPS do this?

Giro fits my head well so I am on a new Chronicle MIPS this season, my first MIPS helmet. No movement at all, it fits better than my old Giro Hex in fact, the ratchet system seems to lock onto my head more securely. Only have a couple rides on it but very happy, especially with MIPS for $150 at LBS.

June 7, 2017, 12:24 p.m.
Posts: 2268
Joined: Nov. 22, 2002

Posted by: tashi

I've shelled out the extra dough for a MIPS helmet, picked up the top-end Smith helmet. First helmet I've tried that fits me as well as a Giro, but I could never stop the thing from bouncing around on my head. It always seemed like it was the outer shell moving, CRANKING down the "RocLoc" (or whatever Smith calls their version) helped, but it didn't eliminate the shake, only seemed to reduce how much the shake actually moved the helmets position on my head. And cranking on it ain't exactly comfy. 

Anyone else had this problem?  Seems like it might just be inherent in this type of system? Gentle trails and road riding was alright, but rough stuff, particularly with a light on, were terrible. Do other helmet models with MIPS do this?

I have not had a problem like that with any helmet in recent memory. Obviously a helmet-mounted light will exacerbate that issue, but it sounds like you may need something that fits a bit lower or even has a lower CoG.

June 7, 2017, 10:23 p.m.
Posts: 31
Joined: Jan. 14, 2016

As far as I can see, none of these new style helmets directly claim that they reduce concussions. They often say something like "reduces forces known to cause concussions". I think that if a company could show that their product reduced concussions, they would be shouting it with a megaphone.

June 8, 2017, 1:53 a.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: June 6, 2017

The helmet I talked about before (now on my second one) was a Giro Savant MIPS - I've never had that issue with it shaking around, even when riding some of the rough stuff (yes I HAVE taken my road helmet MTB'ing a couple of times...).

If you take the helmet off, the fit system isn't attached to the MIPS layer, but to the shell itself - so it shouldn't be the MIPS causing the issue.

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