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Help! seized-and now stripped-bolt

Oct. 5, 2009, 5:27 a.m.
Posts: 15538
Joined: May 29, 2004

There's some sort of "spray ice" or something like that that chills anything it's sprayed on. Careful, it's dangerously cold. Anyways, when it's applied to a stuck bolt, the metal contracts so the bolt gets thinner and the hole gets bigger. Spray that stuff on before trying any of the solutions above and it should help immensely.

Anyone know what this stuff is actually called?

Nitrogen.

Oct. 5, 2009, 8:13 a.m.
Posts: 13934
Joined: March 15, 2003

how does this work for lets say those allen head bolts that go into crowns. My bolts were replaced with stronger 12.9 grade steel bolts I was given from a bike shop, instead of the regular aluminum ones. Should I be appling grease on the threads? Currently, i have a little bit of medium lock tight on those bolts? Can you apply both grease and lock tight?

if you just use plain white grease or other head set grease, it almost acts a bit like lock tite - as in, the grease on the threads that is exposed hardens, not allowing in water and mud, though the bolt will still back out easy enough. i would never use lock tite on my crown

Oct. 5, 2009, 9:17 a.m.
Posts: 11680
Joined: Aug. 11, 2003

At work, I've seen and fixed many stripped screw heads. A lot of the problem comes from having Stainless hardware in an aluminium part. The two metals gall, so will bind easily causing a lot more friction. To remove the screw I have a number of steps.
1: use a freshly sharpened allen key.
2: Drill the head of the screw off. If it's an M5 screw, then I use a 5.5mm drill bit. This will break the head off the screw releasing the pressure off the threads. If they are galled, you are still screwed.
3: use an easy out (reverse threaded bit).

When mounting screws, make sure that all threads are prepped (loctite or grease), your tools are sharp, and you follow the torque specs.

Oct. 5, 2009, 1:05 p.m.
Posts: 795
Joined: Aug. 1, 2004

Should I be appling grease on the threads? Currently, i have a little bit of medium lock tight on those bolts? Can you apply both grease and lock tight?

You should never install bolts with nothing on them. Either use grease or a combination of grease and loctite unless it is something that is likely to work itself loose like pivot bolts, then loctite only is an okay option. Installing dry bolts is a good way to strip out the threads or heads.

Oct. 5, 2009, 1:13 p.m.
Posts: 8256
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

what about an EZ Out?

WTB Frequency i23 rim, 650b NEW - $40

Oct. 5, 2009, 1:43 p.m.
Posts: 4740
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

this:

http://reviews.canadiantire.ca/9045/0543809P/reviews.htm

rounded the head on a bolt on my stem. bought one of these. step 1: use the reamer end to ream out the head. step 2: reverse the bit, slowly drive in the the grabit end counter clockwise, at a slight angle, until it bites and pulls out your bolt. done

Another vote for the Grabit's.

Oct. 5, 2009, 5:40 p.m.
Posts: 1073
Joined: Sept. 8, 2004

At work, I've seen and fixed many stripped screw heads. A lot of the problem comes from having Stainless hardware in an aluminium part. The two metals gall, so will bind easily causing a lot more friction. To remove the screw I have a number of steps.
1: use a freshly sharpened allen key.
2: Drill the head of the screw off. If it's an M5 screw, then I use a 5.5mm drill bit. This will break the head off the screw releasing the pressure off the threads. If they are galled, you are still screwed.
3: use an easy out (reverse threaded bit).

When mounting screws, make sure that all threads are prepped (loctite or grease), your tools are sharp, and you follow the torque specs.

Regarding drilling out the heads…. I need a drill bit the same diameter or bigger than the screw shaft, correct?
I'm concerned about damaging the rocker the bolt is passing through.

I'm going to Canadian Tire tonight. I'm gonna buy a few of things mentioned here and hope one works without damaging the bike or shock

Oct. 5, 2009, 9:22 p.m.
Posts: 61
Joined: Oct. 24, 2007

If the screw extractor doesn't work, another possibility is to weld a bolt to the head of your screw. Any good/independent car mechanic could do it as long as they do exhaust work. I once had it done on a broken stud in the head of an engine. The guy charged me $20 if I remember correctly.

Oct. 6, 2009, 12:44 p.m.
Posts: 1073
Joined: Sept. 8, 2004

Thanks everyone, I finally got it off. I ended up drilling through the head as safely as possible, enough to hammer a bigger SAE allen key in and torque the bolt off.

Oct. 6, 2009, 12:55 p.m.
Posts: 11680
Joined: Aug. 11, 2003

Regarding drilling out the heads…. I need a drill bit the same diameter or bigger than the screw shaft, correct?
I'm concerned about damaging the rocker the bolt is passing through.

I'm going to Canadian Tire tonight. I'm gonna buy a few of things mentioned here and hope one works without damaging the bike or shock

If you aren't sure what's behind the screw, then it's probably best to not proceed. Normally there will be a washer, or enough clearance to use a larger drill like I mentioned.

If the screw extractor doesn't work, another possibility is to weld a bolt to the head of your screw. Any good/independent car mechanic could do it as long as they do exhaust work. I once had it done on a broken stud in the head of an engine. The guy charged me $20 if I remember correctly.

If the hardware is aluminium, then welding won't work. The close proximity of the heat could do some damage too, if not careful.

Oct. 12, 2009, 9:38 a.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

so what happened? what worked?

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

Oct. 12, 2009, 5:14 p.m.
Posts: 1073
Joined: Sept. 8, 2004

so what happened? what worked?

Thanks everyone, I finally got it off. I ended up drilling through the head as safely as possible, enough to hammer a bigger SAE allen key in and torque the bolt off

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