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Does anyone need an update anymore?

Jan. 22, 2021, 2:15 p.m.
Posts: 14773
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

well you did move out there but its not really out there

If you have/get a job that puts you on the road you are really close to Hy 1, I knew a kayak distributor (kevin something) who picked Barriere to set up

The narth west is more really out there cuz its an inconvienient 13hr drive from any major center or an expensive plane ride,

YMMV but vangroovy drives me absofuckinglootley crazy BUT get on the road past langley I feel better, past Abotsford even better, Chiliwack better still, across the hope bridge AND its all good

Jan. 22, 2021, 5:33 p.m.
Posts: 810
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: DemonMike

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: JBV

And ya long over due move. As much as I loved living in Fraser Valley. The costs and constant growth drained us.

interesting observation. i was reading some economic study that said people in rapidly developing economies are less happy than people in stable economies. even if the rapid development brings affluence.  it seems that people didn't evolve with rapid swirling change around them; life was slower. most people prefer this.

I've been trying to leave the city for a decade. Still can't quite break loose. Now I have two homes - a very small one in Van and a much roomier one on the island. My wife and I always talk about settling on one spot but every time we go to the other place we realize how much we like it as well. We tried small town living in the Kootenays for a couple of years and after about a year we were tired of the same stuff all the time. Sure the snow was divine and the loam was to die for but you can only ride and ski so much. Sometimes its nice to put on some nice clothes and go out for a stellar dinner, walk home over the burrard bridge as the sun is setting yadda yadda. Can't do that in small town BC (yet). I think our outlook would be different if we had kids, but we don't so two homes it is!

We started in North Burnaby in the late 80,s. Then moved to Hammond in Maple Ridge. Amazing little community, but it got busy. The Golden Ears bridge didn,t help. From there to Whonnock semi-rural Maple Ridge. It was very quiet and peaceful as well 15yrs ago. And it got busier as well. We lived a few hundred feet from 272nd. That road is non stop for traffic at all hours now. Best location for riding thou. Woodlot and Thornhill where minutes away. Bear and Red where 15/20min drive . We did consider moving to Steelhead area , or Deroche and such. But losing both our jobs this year. We said we always talked about starting from scratch. This is a great time to do it. No regrets what so ever for us. We don,t have the equity we had before. But we also don,t have any mortgages or debts . It,s also the time to bring back the generational family property. This land will go to our children in the future. And we get to build a house and shop to suit our needs.

This is such a great story. Although I have a great job, it also rules my life in a lot of ways. When I have a bad day at work, what you are doing is very tempting. But the next day is usually pretty good and I am back in the groove. Both my jobs were very very secure during COVID (health care and education) but it has been a demanding year and forced my wife and I to reconsider our priorities. I see some changes in my future. Nothing solid yet, but definitely on the horizon.

Jan. 22, 2021, 5:41 p.m.
Posts: 2383
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: Cheez1ts

Posted by: mammal

TLDR: As soon as I reached a point in my life that I could afford upgrades for the sake of upgrades, it all starts with one bike/component. Then the others need it. After typing all this out, I understand why many are saying "don't demo bikes regularly unless you want to buy". This also makes me understand the appeal of one do-it-all bike, but I guess that's just one compromise

I'm not willing to make. Upgrades can be a slippery slope with no end, if you don't find a reason to control the slide.

Thank you for sharing. I do occasionally stress sometimes that my other bikes wont be good anymore once I get one new trail bike.

My DH bike has the same reach and wheel size as my trail bike. I'm afraid as soon as I go to a longer, slacker, 29" trail bike, I will also need to buy a new longer, slacker, 29" DH bike. Aside from the $$$, that will be tough to do during a pandemic.

Do you have a trail bike in mind already ? I will more than likely be getting rid of mine. It,s a 2017 Django aluminum 29er. Much like you I have a small fortune into the fork and rear shocks LOL.

Jan. 22, 2021, 6:16 p.m.
Posts: 2000
Joined: Jan. 5, 2010

Posted by: DemonMike

Do you have a trail bike in mind already ? I will more than likely be getting rid of mine. It,s a 2017 Django aluminum 29er. Much like you I have a small fortune into the fork and rear shocks LOL.

I'd like a burly, smaller travel 29r, on the budget end of things around 480mm of reach.

  • Giant Trance X
  • Ibis Ripmo AF
  • Marin Rift Zone

  • Kona Process 134

Django looks a little steep and short unfortunately. But I'm probably all talk and no action anyway, I'll likely ride my current process until it cracks.

Jan. 22, 2021, 6:29 p.m.
Posts: 2383
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: Cheez1ts

Posted by: DemonMike

Do you have a trail bike in mind already ? I will more than likely be getting rid of mine. It,s a 2017 Django aluminum 29er. Much like you I have a small fortune into the fork and rear shocks LOL.

I'd like a burly, smaller travel 29r, on the budget end of things around 480mm of reach.

  • Giant Trance X
  • Ibis Ripmo AF
  • Marin Rift Zone

  • Kona Process 134

Django looks a little steep and short unfortunately. But I'm probably all talk and no action anyway, I'll likely ride my current process until it cracks.

150mm fork and 1.5deg angle set.

The new Marshal looks killer . Made in Canada frame as well.

Jan. 22, 2021, 11:35 p.m.
Posts: 11771
Joined: June 4, 2008

30.5 inch wheels are the sweet spot.

Jan. 23, 2021, 7:31 a.m.
Posts: 975
Joined: June 26, 2012

Posted by: rnayel

Posted by: tashi

2016 Rootdown to ?????

2021 Rootdown

I wouldn’t bother. The Rootdown has seen only minor tweaks since the first B.A. in 2016.

Jan. 23, 2021, 8:01 a.m.
Posts: 316
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

Posted by: heathen

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: Vikb

I should note that with STAs getting super steep and my body not being able to pedal them enjoyably for long periods most/a lot of the new bikes I see splashed across MTB media sites I don't think I could comfortably ride so that helps tame any impulse purchase risk...not to mention how expensive the frame up builds are that I would undertake if I was getting a new FS bike.

I wonder if the next big development will be layback dropper posts to slacken too steep sta's? I have the seat on my primer slammed to the back to slacken that sta, and its not even that steep. I'm not sure old bodies are made for 78 deg sta's. 

Also, I quite like a bike that gets on the back wheel easily. I think that has fallen out of style with longer chainstays (especially on bigger bikes). I'm wondering if in 5 years I will even be able to find anything that rides as playful as my 27.5 evil and knolly do. I kind of assume all bikes will have 10mm longer chainstays, 50mm longer wheelbases and 29 inch wheels in 5 years. 

People will stare and point at my prehistoric bikes and wonder how I possibly get down the mountain with 16.5" chainstays and a 74 deg sta and I will look back at them and wink knowingly and then they will be taken aback and wonder what it is I know that they don't. Could there be some secret sauce in my old geo that gone lost in search of all out speed?

What is it about steep STA are you finding that hurts your old body? Much like Tasha i have found the steep STA to help my lower back pain.

Jan. 23, 2021, 8:12 a.m.
Posts: 566
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: heathen

What is it about steep STA are you finding that hurts your old body? Much like Tasha i have found the steep STA to help my lower back pain.

I don't find the steep STAs comfortable for pedaling unless the trails are super steep. I don't generate power well in that position for general riding either. I also have no issue sliding forward on my saddle for those super steep climbs so I don't see the benefit of a really steep STA vs. something more moderate. I ride to the trails as much as possible and even though I would say our trails involve a lot of climbing there is still a fair bit of each ride that's either rolling or less steep climbing. Really steep STAs are an answer to a problem I wasn't having.

I'm 5'11" with a 33" pants inseam so not short, but not super tall either.

I should add I'm not suggesting there is anything wrong with steep STAs in general except that they don't work well for me in particular. If they work well for you I think it's great you have that option available to you. 


 Last edited by: Vikb on Jan. 23, 2021, 8:32 a.m., edited 2 times in total.
Jan. 23, 2021, 10:48 a.m.
Posts: 14773
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: DemonMike

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: JBV

And ya long over due move. As much as I loved living in Fraser Valley. The costs and constant growth drained us.

interesting observation. i was reading some economic study that said people in rapidly developing economies are less happy than people in stable economies. even if the rapid development brings affluence.  it seems that people didn't evolve with rapid swirling change around them; life was slower. most people prefer this.

I've been trying to leave the city for a decade. Still can't quite break loose. Now I have two homes - a very small one in Van and a much roomier one on the island. My wife and I always talk about settling on one spot but every time we go to the other place we realize how much we like it as well. We tried small town living in the Kootenays for a couple of years and after about a year we were tired of the same stuff all the time. Sure the snow was divine and the loam was to die for but you can only ride and ski so much. Sometimes its nice to put on some nice clothes and go out for a stellar dinner, walk home over the burrard bridge as the sun is setting yadda yadda. Can't do that in small town BC (yet). I think our outlook would be different if we had kids, but we don't so two homes it is!

We started in North Burnaby in the late 80,s. Then moved to Hammond in Maple Ridge. Amazing little community, but it got busy. The Golden Ears bridge didn,t help. From there to Whonnock semi-rural Maple Ridge. It was very quiet and peaceful as well 15yrs ago. And it got busier as well. We lived a few hundred feet from 272nd. That road is non stop for traffic at all hours now. Best location for riding thou. Woodlot and Thornhill where minutes away. Bear and Red where 15/20min drive . We did consider moving to Steelhead area , or Deroche and such. But losing both our jobs this year. We said we always talked about starting from scratch. This is a great time to do it. No regrets what so ever for us. We don,t have the equity we had before. But we also don,t have any mortgages or debts . It,s also the time to bring back the generational family property. This land will go to our children in the future. And we get to build a house and shop to suit our needs.

This is such a great story. Although I have a great job, it also rules my life in a lot of ways. When I have a bad day at work, what you are doing is very tempting. But the next day is usually pretty good and I am back in the groove. Both my jobs were very very secure during COVID (health care and education) but it has been a demanding year and forced my wife and I to reconsider our priorities. I see some changes in my future. Nothing solid yet, but definitely on the horizon.

The "people with laptops"  know there is a way better life when they are  beyond hope, 15-20 yars ago the old fucks on town council made jokes about a few people with laptops 

now  laptop nation are everywhere

Jan. 23, 2021, 10:58 a.m.
Posts: 810
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: heathen

What is it about steep STA are you finding that hurts your old body? Much like Tasha i have found the steep STA to help my lower back pain.

I don't find the steep STAs comfortable for pedaling unless the trails are super steep. I don't generate power well in that position for general riding either. I also have no issue sliding forward on my saddle for those super steep climbs so I don't see the benefit of a really steep STA vs. something more moderate. I ride to the trails as much as possible and even though I would say our trails involve a lot of climbing there is still a fair bit of each ride that's either rolling or less steep climbing. Really steep STAs are an answer to a problem I wasn't having.

I'm 5'11" with a 33" pants inseam so not short, but not super tall either.

This ^

Also, a more traditional STA allows you to sit on your seat and keeps the pressure on your hands light. Your center of gravity is hovering over the pedals. Steep STA's tip that center of gravity forwards so it sits between the cranks and handlebars. This puts additional weight on the hands. I don't think most riders notice this as they put their handlebars higher than their saddle, which puts weight back on their seats. As a taller rider with long legs and shorter torso, it is very hard to get the bars even level with the saddle let alone higher than the seat. Also, you can't really generate a lot of power with your body sitting upright, so I don't really want my bars way up high.

I made a picture to explain it all. The blue circle is supposed to be the centre of gravity.

Jan. 23, 2021, 12:38 p.m.
Posts: 1350
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Looks like the old triathlon bike debate all over again. 

In the end we all moved forward though, despite the loss in wattage. Comfortable equals fast it turned out.

Jan. 23, 2021, 1:56 p.m.
Posts: 978
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: Hepcat

Looks like the old triathlon bike debate all over again. 

In the end we all moved forward though, despite the loss in wattage. Comfortable equals fast it turned out.

Jan. 23, 2021, 4:43 p.m.
Posts: 810
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: Hepcat

Looks like the old triathlon bike debate all over again. 

In the end we all moved forward though, despite the loss in wattage. Comfortable equals fast it turned out.

I guess it depends on what people consider fast. I agree that having your handlebar high is comfortable, but it's not fast. A steep sta only offers a real advantage on the steepest climb. People like it because it makes the hardest climb easier. I would rather prioritize 90% of pedaling and use my core for the last 10%. If my bikes had the equivalent of a beach cruiser in terms of body position, id constantly be trying to drop my torso and id be pedaling with my elbows bent to 90 degrees and my hands, wrists and shoulders would be carrying more weight due to the more forward center of gravity. 

Tri bikes are fast because they are aero but they are not comfortable and they put a lot of weight on your hands. I would know, I used to compete in triathlon up to an international level. You have to be fit and flexible to make a proper tri bike work.

Jan. 23, 2021, 9:02 p.m.
Posts: 2383
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: heathen

What is it about steep STA are you finding that hurts your old body? Much like Tasha i have found the steep STA to help my lower back pain.

I don't find the steep STAs comfortable for pedaling unless the trails are super steep. I don't generate power well in that position for general riding either. I also have no issue sliding forward on my saddle for those super steep climbs so I don't see the benefit of a really steep STA vs. something more moderate. I ride to the trails as much as possible and even though I would say our trails involve a lot of climbing there is still a fair bit of each ride that's either rolling or less steep climbing. Really steep STAs are an answer to a problem I wasn't having.

I'm 5'11" with a 33" pants inseam so not short, but not super tall either.

This ^

Also, a more traditional STA allows you to sit on your seat and keeps the pressure on your hands light. Your center of gravity is hovering over the pedals. Steep STA's tip that center of gravity forwards so it sits between the cranks and handlebars. This puts additional weight on the hands. I don't think most riders notice this as they put their handlebars higher than their saddle, which puts weight back on their seats. As a taller rider with long legs and shorter torso, it is very hard to get the bars even level with the saddle let alone higher than the seat. Also, you can't really generate a lot of power with your body sitting upright, so I don't really want my bars way up high.

I made a picture to explain it all. The blue circle is supposed to be the centre of gravity.

As one who squatted a lot back in the day. When talking power the steep STA and High bar is going to give you the most power IMO. Quads and hams are used more , than glutes and lower back. The steepest STA bike I have owned is my new bike . I have ridden others and you could feel the difference right away. My new bike felt similar to my Django. Course this is just a quick parking lot test.

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