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City e-bike buying tips

Sept. 23, 2022, 8:25 a.m.
Posts: 485
Joined: June 17, 2016

Posted by: XXX_er

Bullit is basicly a high end enduro bike with 7" of travel but there is no way around the 15-20 lbs of battery & motor so it performs very well but i wouldn't say its light as a featehr, you gotta pay attention to that extra weight on some parts of the trail where if you put a foot down in a bad spot you are going over

But its way lighter than an HT ALU Giant city bike with shitty components/ no rear suspension, I wouldn't wana ride one of those on a real mtnbike trail and thats the thing with the cheap mtn bike I never see them on the real mtn bike trail system cuz a trail with a few features is too much

the parkey told told me he thot they would suck until he rode one on the wide easy hiking roads in the park cuz they saved them a lot of time they would have spent hiking

A high-end mountain bike being lighter than a city bike is not really a surprise. A classic Dutch grandma bike weighs over 20 kg (44 lbs) typically.

And a mountain bike trail with features being too much for a city bike is not really a surprise either. It's called a city bike for a reason.

This thread is about buying an upright city e-bike for a person with mobility issues. Friendly request to stay on topic, thanks.

Sept. 23, 2022, 8:35 a.m.
Posts: 15604
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

well it was actualy pertaining to  city E-bikes used on a gravel road by employees who are glad they don't have to walk so much

Sept. 23, 2022, 11:23 a.m.
Posts: 2461
Joined: April 2, 2005

those low entry bikes need to be that heavy as the frame only has the connection around the motor for stability. needs more meat obviously

Sept. 23, 2022, 11:26 a.m.
Posts: 2461
Joined: April 2, 2005

a light city bike with a diamond frame and the fazua system should be easily under 20kg, the new riese und müller urban bike is 20kg with an over build aluminium frame

https://www.r-m.de/de/bikes/ubn-five/

Sept. 23, 2022, 12:34 p.m.
Posts: 485
Joined: June 17, 2016

Step-through entry is a requirement for her. If that means a little extra weight, so be it.

Fazua is a new lighter, less bulky, less powerful motor isn't it? I hadn't thought of that option yet. The concept appeals to me more than the overpowered bulky ones but it would have to have sufficient assist for her of course.

I think at this point we just need to make a round along the local shops to see what's available here and do some test rides.

Thanks everyone for the tips, I have a better idea now of what's going on in e-bike world and what the pros & cons are of the different options.

Sept. 23, 2022, 12:58 p.m.
Posts: 35
Joined: July 24, 2013

If the OP can make it to the Voltbike store in Coquitlam, they have all the versions of bikes available to demo.  I own a Mariner, and previously owned a Yukon.  They are solid, trouble free bikes and able to be serviced at the location, if necessary.  At the least you get to try the different styles of bikes (they are similar between companies). 

My takes as an ebiker.  It's different than a regular bike.  Heavier, faster etc.  I do like "fat tires" on an ebike as they dampen the ride and provide comfort.  In the city can be pumped up, gravel can be aired down a bit.  I take my Mariner (non-step through) up and down coastal logging roads as well as ride in the city. 

I belong to an ebike forum on facebook.  There are many, many heartwarming posts from older folk and folk with mobility issues that have there worlds opened up and changed by the addition of an ebike.

Sept. 24, 2022, 12:27 p.m.
Posts: 485
Joined: June 17, 2016

Posted by: thefishtailbites

If the OP can make it to the Voltbike store in Coquitlam, they have all the versions of bikes available to demo. I own a Mariner, and previously owned a Yukon. They are solid, trouble free bikes and able to be serviced at the location, if necessary. At the least you get to try the different styles of bikes (they are similar between companies).

My takes as an ebiker. It's different than a regular bike. Heavier, faster etc. I do like "fat tires" on an ebike as they dampen the ride and provide comfort. In the city can be pumped up, gravel can be aired down a bit. I take my Mariner (non-step through) up and down coastal logging roads as well as ride in the city.

I belong to an ebike forum on facebook. There are many, many heartwarming posts from older folk and folk with mobility issues that have there worlds opened up and changed by the addition of an ebike.

We live on the island now so Coquitlam is a bit out of the way for us but there are many stores local and in the area here so we should be able to try out a variety of options.

Good point on bigger volume tires for comfort. When she used a wheelchair earlier this year we discovered that the little shocks from going over bumps were detrimental to her condition.

We're still hopeful her condition will improve enough to not need the motor assistance at some point but in the meantime an e-bike seems like a good mobility solution for her. Sure beats a wheelchair.


 Last edited by: niels@nsmb.com on Sept. 24, 2022, 12:28 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Sept. 25, 2022, 9:44 a.m.
Posts: 2319
Joined: April 25, 2003

Plus one to the fat tires comment, you’re MOVING on a ebike and big tires are very helpful with any type of road irregularities at higher speeds.

I’m pretty curious about the RadRover for this reason.


 Last edited by: tashi on Sept. 25, 2022, 9:45 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Sept. 25, 2022, 9:58 a.m.
Posts: 1532
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Suspension forks and suspension seatposts are quite popular on the urban e-bikes at my LBS. As well as big tires. That makes sense as there are a lot of urban e-bikers who can't or don't want to ride their bikes dynamically so they need some mitigation mechanisms for dealing with the impacts of road obstacles.

Sept. 25, 2022, 10:27 a.m.
Posts: 485
Joined: June 17, 2016

FWIW an upright bike is not meant or designed to be ridden dynamically (like a mountain bike is for example). You just sit and pedal.

I'd probably prefer to avoid a suspension fork and/or suspension seatpost for simplicity. I think tire volume is a nice simple and effective way to increase comfort. I doubt going all the way to fat tires is necessary but we'll try to test all options.

Sept. 25, 2022, 10:47 a.m.
Posts: 1532
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: niels@nsmb.com

FWIW an upright bike is not meant or designed to be ridden dynamically (like a mountain bike is for example). You just sit and pedal.

I'd probably prefer to avoid a suspension fork and/or suspension seatpost for simplicity. I think tire volume is a nice simple and effective way to increase comfort. I doubt going all the way to fat tires is necessary but we'll try to test all options.

I have ridden a bunch of city bikes and a number of the current crop of urban e-bikes. You can certainly steer around obstacles and take pressure from the saddle with your legs which adds a lot of suspension effect to the ride. Talking to the folks who own the e-bikes I've worked on they are either not able to or don't want to do that. So they are looking for ways mechanically to mitigate impacts.

Tires and suspension components mitigate different parts or the frequency spectrum of impacts. That makes sense as the tire casing is light and can move rapidly, but there is a limited amount of movement available. Suspension is heavier so it takes more time to react, but can move a lot more distance. So it depends what parts of the ride experience the rider wants to mitigate.

Suspension definitely adds cost, complexity and maintenance effort to the equation.


 Last edited by: Vikb on Sept. 25, 2022, 10:48 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Sept. 26, 2022, 7:45 a.m.
Posts: 2319
Joined: April 25, 2003

Posted by: Vikb

Suspension forks and suspension seatposts are quite popular on the urban e-bikes at my LBS. As well as big tires. That makes sense as there are a lot of urban e-bikers who can't or don't want to ride their bikes dynamically so they need some mitigation mechanisms for dealing with the impacts of road obstacles.

I say this based on my personal, daily, experience using a city e-bike and being a rider that rides  all my bikes dynamically: 

Larger tires and suspension are appreciated on a city e-bike due to the higher speeds preventing being able to avoid every little bump and irregularity, not riding style.  Just like how a motorcycle uses larger tires than a bicycle.

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