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Brake Pads for 2023 Norco Fluid FS A2

June 7, 2024, 7:09 a.m.
Posts: 2
Joined: June 7, 2024

Hi,

I am looking for advice on brake pads.

I have a Mountain Bike (2023 Norco Fluid FS A2) that uses 4-Piston TRP Slate EVO Brakes. The bike came with organic pads. While they're working well, when I go to replace these pads, I would like something that is better suited for the wetness.

With this in mind, I was reading a NSMB article

(https://nsmb.com/articles/trp-slate-evo-brakes-reviewed/) that says:

"All 4-piston TRP brakes use the same pad style, which also happen to be cross-compatible with Shimano XT and SLX 4-piston brakes"

I reached out to TRP and they said:

“TRP brakes are built around a complete system. All testing, production through many attempts has been through perfecting our pad material. For that reason we only recommend using TRP pads. We do not know how it will sound feel etc using a different brand.

I would recommend the semi metallic pad with the red backing plate. They are one step toward a harder compound. They will last longer in wet conditions.

https://trpcycling.com/products/semi-met-4-piston

With this in mind, which non-TRP, metallic brake pads can I look at ? I'm a little new to this, so I just want to make sure I fully understand everything.

Thanks.

June 7, 2024, 10:15 a.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 16, 2013

You can use anything that's compatible with Shimano 4-piston brakes. People have their preferences, but I would go for fully metallic/sintered pads for max bite. Shimano brand work well, but there are lots of others too, recently I've had good experiences with Galfer pads.

June 7, 2024, 4:50 p.m.
Posts: 98
Joined: Dec. 1, 2008

+1. Shimano sintered work well in the wet. As do Galfer Red (Advanced) and Galfer Black (Standard).

June 7, 2024, 5:34 p.m.
Posts: 2593
Joined: April 25, 2003

I'm a big believer in Shimano parts but was came to prefer the MTX reds over Shimano metallics when COVID parts shortages forced me to branch out.

I'd suggest that response from TRP to be a CYA statement: they're tested and approved with TRP pads, so they can only accept liability for TRP pads, from both a performance and legal standpoint.  IME brakes aren't "systems" but levers that push pistons that grab metal discs, and they can often be swapped around safely.

June 7, 2024, 8:08 p.m.
Posts: 791
Joined: Jan. 2, 2018

I also like mtx red.

When you change pads, I recommend changing rotors as well. Sometimes original rotors on systems with organic pads are "organic only" rotors. Even if they aren't, pads essentially leave a film of pad material on the rotor surface, and the organic film will contaminate your new pads. 

So yeah I'd vote new rotors and mtx.

June 7, 2024, 8:48 p.m.
Posts: 2
Joined: June 7, 2024

Thanks for the reply. Can some rubbing alcohol take care of the rotor film?

June 7, 2024, 8:53 p.m.
Posts: 16033
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

When CRC was still going I stocked up on a card of 8 nukeproof semi metallic pads for pretty cheap like almost half price, they were rated OK on the user comments so i gave it a try

make sure you don't put the pads in backwards

June 7, 2024, 10:39 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 16, 2013

Posted by: brusnell

Thanks for the reply. Can some rubbing alcohol take care of the rotor film?

I find brake cleaner works better

June 8, 2024, 8:08 a.m.
Posts: 2593
Joined: April 25, 2003

I use methyl hydrate since it doesn’t leave any residue and seems to be an adequately strong solvent for brake material.

June 9, 2024, 10:41 a.m.
Posts: 203
Joined: March 1, 2017

I wouldn't take what TRP said too seriously. 

Shimano D02S pads are fairly priced and last well.

Be aware (if you are not) that sintered / metal pads will be noisier in the wet, at least until the heat generated dries the system out. My Formula brakes are only noisy for a few revolutions of the rotor and then are quiet. Others are different..... I remember a certain local influencer stating that he liked his super noisy brakes because it showed that they were working ha ha ha ha haha.

Applying sand paper to the rotor when spinning the wheel (being careful not to have the rotor pull the sand paper away from you hand and slice it open!) and then cleaning with Iso will prep the rotor for the new different pads.

June 9, 2024, 12:16 p.m.
Posts: 16033
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

If you wana do the sanding you rotors thing get an electric drill mounted sanding disc with a red 40 grit sanding disc and run it at high speed on the rotor at a bit of an angle ( you will figure it out) it will safely rotate your wheel at a much higher speed than you ever could while sanding the rotor but honestly even this method doesnt take off much material

June 9, 2024, 12:44 p.m.
Posts: 98
Joined: Dec. 1, 2008

Considering the price of good rotors and the experiences by myself and plenty of people I know, I would argue against changing rotors.

Just make sure you bed the new pads in properly as recommend by the manufacturer.

Switching between types of pads has never been an issue for anyone I know. The worst that would happen is that bedding in takes a bit longer.


 Last edited by: Timer on June 10, 2024, 3:41 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
June 9, 2024, 8:03 p.m.
Posts: 16033
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

I've had to replace rotors that were SO worn in the center that they were trashing brake pads but otherwise it wasn't needed .

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