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Bikes on airplanes

May 20, 2006, 8:33 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Nov. 11, 2005

Hey there,

I

May 20, 2006, 11:07 p.m.
Posts: 6610
Joined: Sept. 4, 2003

Go to your local bike shop and ask them for a bike box. The ones their new bikes come in from the factory. Those should be free or run you $5.

Also ask if you can check out an unassembled bike (waiting to be assembled) in the box, it should give you a VERY good idea as to how it should be strapped, packed, etc. etc.

Once you find your box, you can visit your post office to get bubble wrap. Yes, the stuff used on the Jackass guy is called bubble wrap. Quite fun to pop as well.

1) Take off front wheel. Strap it to middle sections of your frame using zapstraps. Note where your tire/rim/hub could possibly hit your frame and use extra padding where necessary.

2) Take off stem with the handlebar attached and zapstrap that to the other side of the frame. Once again, note where there would be possible unwanted contact with your bike and use padding.

2.5) If you have a disc brake system, remember the card(s) in between the pads.

3) Remove pedals and put it into a small box or pad it and throw it into the bike box where it won't fly around/nail your bike.

4) Zapstrap your rear wheel to the frame so it won't rotate and possibly move your cranks.

5) Throw all the bubble wrap/newspapers in there so NOTHING is going to be bounced around.

6) Packing tape the hell out of the box. All the seams and openings.

7) Throw it onto the luggage carousel and enjoy the flight back to Germany!

Sober

May 20, 2006, 11:54 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Nov. 11, 2005

Skunkworks,

Thank you very much for your advise. Some great recommendations. The plastic stuff my hostdad was talking about was not bubble wrap but the stuff they wrapped around the bubble wrap. About a foot or two wide, plastic, clear, kinda like the stuff to keep leftovers "fresh"…

One question about the bar though, if I take it off and strap it to the frame, what do I do with the brake levers and shifters? Do I just leave them on the bar or should I take them off and attach them seperately?

Again, thank you so much!

May 21, 2006, 12:26 a.m.
Posts: 33348
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

The levers can stay on the bar.

Like SkunkworkS said, make you you put something between the pads of the from disc brake.

Tape up some bubble wrap to the bike. Pack extra tape and zap straps for your return home.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

May 21, 2006, 12:42 a.m.
Posts: 6610
Joined: Sept. 4, 2003

The plastic stuff my hostdad was talking about was not bubble wrap but the stuff they wrapped around the bubble wrap. About a foot or two wide, plastic, clear, kinda like the stuff to keep leftovers "fresh"…

You mean saran wrap? Those will do fine/excel in keeping everything together. But by no means is it an alternative to bubble wrap.

One question about the bar though, if I take it off and strap it to the frame, what do I do with the brake levers and shifters? Do I just leave them on the bar or should I take them off and attach them seperately?

You would be better off turning the shifter and brake levers parallel with the frame after you strap it on rather than taking them off. Leaving them on is fine, just make sure they don't stick out, it'll guarantee them being knocked on and damaged.

Sober

May 21, 2006, 4:53 a.m.
Posts: 2720
Joined: Nov. 22, 2002

get a bike shop to box it up… the local shops here do it for 15bucks including box… not a bad price, saves hassles…

they know how bikes come out of boxes and stuff…

if weight is too much, ditch the tyres/tubes/grips/possibly seat, well cheap stuff thats expendable and probably cheaper to re buy at the other end than pay extra freight charges

May 21, 2006, 6:29 a.m.
Posts: 574
Joined: March 8, 2006

you should also space your forks with an old hub or by using the little plastic spacers that come when you buy new forks. that stops the fork legs being crushed together.

Yeah, deep penetration is pretty key. Unfortunately it can be hard to achieve, lubrication can definitely help in some cases.

May 21, 2006, 12:15 p.m.
Posts: 3670
Joined: Aug. 22, 2005

^ Yes, I was about to say, Would not be fun to get back to Germany with a cracked arch. If you can go to the bike shop and get a crankpuller..unless you already own one, makes quite a difference with the cranks off.

May 21, 2006, 8:07 p.m.
Posts: 977
Joined: Oct. 21, 2004

One question about the bar though, if I take it off and strap it to the frame, what do I do with the brake levers and shifters? Do I just leave them on the bar or should I take them off and attach them seperately?

leave the brake levers and shifters on the bar, but loosen the bolts that hold them on - this allows free rotation away from what ever it is that's trying to break them.

Chirp

May 22, 2006, 1:28 a.m.
Posts: 467
Joined: March 25, 2004

I'm more concerned about snakes on a plane

My Baby: Yeti AS-X, XT hydros, Slider with James' lovin, EX721 on hadleys, diabolus cranks, thomson and X9

For Sale: Thomson Setback 27.2x330 Seatpost near mint $45. IS6-IS8 adapter $20. Mobster 2.7 50% tread $10. 27.2 post $10. 90mm 10mm rise stem $20. Bontrager crowbar steel $10

Make me an offer on any of these

May 23, 2006, 8:25 a.m.
Posts: 233
Joined: Nov. 25, 2002

I just bought one of the Dakine bike boxes. Works great but even the box by itself is heavy. 12 or 13 lbs heavy. I think total weight with my bike (Heckler, single crown) pads and a bit of other gear was around 65 lbs.

Lots of handles and the built-in wheels make for easy transport.

May 23, 2006, 10:20 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: March 27, 2005

make sure you cover the derailer as well, a knock can kill it and that is bad.

May 23, 2006, 10:34 a.m.
Posts: 977
Joined: Oct. 21, 2004

oh yeah, derailleur - take it right off and wrap it up with old tube or sock or something. same with the disc brake calipers (after you put the spacer between the pads). then tie them to the inside of the rear triangle for protection.

Chirp

May 23, 2006, 11:46 a.m.
Posts: 1324
Joined: Aug. 20, 2005

Overall im not going to repeat good advice but bubblewrap and foam are your best friends baggage handlers dong give a toss how much your pride and joy is worth be it 1000 or 7000. Just package it really well and make sure that NOTHING can wiggle lose. Also dont know if anyone has mentioned this but let the air out of your tires and also possibly the rear shock (im presuming its a dually). Ive heard that the air in the rear shock can damage it at high altitudes no idea if this is true but im sure someone else can shed light on it.

May 23, 2006, 11:48 a.m.
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Anybody tried the Dakine with a big bike?

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