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Anyone Ride Fat Bikes?

Jan. 14, 2015, 8:41 p.m.
Posts: 2026
Joined: May 2, 2004

Went out on one again yesterday and ran in to nearly unridable conditions for the most part now that there's more snow in whistler valley, and maybe because it's a bit warmer, too bad, last couple times out it was perfect and I was having a blast

Jan. 14, 2015, 9:22 p.m.
Posts: 2405
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

http://www.turnerbikes.com/bike/models/turner/khan#features

Turner is in the market as well now

#northsidetrailbuilders

Jan. 15, 2015, 5:54 a.m.
Posts: 967
Joined: Feb. 28, 2014

Your trail looks boring and you appear to be riding alone.

You got a lot out of that trail pic!

The trails were pretty good. They were rolling and twisty for the most part, a few short climbs and a couple of nice downhills. Plus I rode hard packed 4x4 roads, a portion of a lake, hard packed and not-so-hard packed trails. From what I was told, these are the best trails in the Kamloops region as of this moment.

I found that where the bike worked the best (frozen lake) it was still as slow as coasting on a 3 wheeler - remember those? Really draggy and cumbersome. I experimented with different pressures too.

I am going to try Xprezo's Gros Big with a Bluto next week to see if that bike is any different.

I'm not sold on fat bikes, but I haven't given up.

And… are you insinuating that riding alone is not fun??? I rode alone a lot and have fun mostly every time. Your results may vary.

Jan. 15, 2015, 6:10 a.m.
Posts: 48
Joined: April 4, 2009

I just rode one for the first time. I have to say, I don't get what the hype is all about.

Instead of getting into it, just read this: http://factionsk8.blogspot.ca/2015/01/fat-bikes-hmm.html

It was only one ride, although I did come back with a good sense of how they perform because conditions were varied.

I read your blog review of your fatbike experience and you have some valid points. Before getting a fatbike I've ridden my skinny bike hundreds of times in snow and slush (out of shear boredom and/or stubbornness) so I know the limits very well. If your sole reason for riding a fatbike is to glide over deep snow and make snow rides just like dirt rides then you will be very disappointed. If your looking to pin snow and rail corners then you will be disappointed. Just like you, I noticed that if the snow is soft and mushy the pedaling will suck even with the fattest of tires. If the snow is super-packed then you can get away with riding your skinny bike. So what happens when you ride your skinny bike on snow is your confined your riding to the "rideable" trails. With the fatbike you can expand what is rideable and when you adapt to how it rides you'd be surprised how much more you can do.

Here's a good example of a ride I recently did. I went on a ride the other day and the trails in the lower sections had about 5" of snow and weren't packed down very well. On a skinny bike I wouldn't of gotten 5' before turning around. With the fatbike I was able to struggle through the entire trail. Once we started climbing it was very packed down and I was able to start hammering. The trail then got very steep and I could still keep pedaling. I did have some hike-a-bike but it was very tolerable. On a skinny bike I would've been fine until it got the least bit steep then my tire would dig in and I'd be walking the entire climb (or turn back). When I got to the top there was a stamped down line down some pretty long steep bits. This is where the fatbike held on nicely. It would've been impossible to ride the skinny tires on this (although I would've tried). In the end we did a 3 hour ride that I wouldn't have even attempted with the skinnybike. Yeah, it was only about 10 miles but we worked hard and had a blast. Probably the coldest beers I ever had were on that ride :)

Now dirt on a fatbike is a whole different ballgame that I wont go into. I'll just leave it as it's way more fun than you think it could be. Give it a try and you'll see.

Jan. 15, 2015, 6:57 a.m.
Posts: 967
Joined: Feb. 28, 2014

I read your blog review of your fatbike experience and you have some valid points. Before getting a fatbike I've ridden my skinny bike hundreds of times in snow and slush (out of shear boredom and/or stubbornness) so I know the limits very well. If your sole reason for riding a fatbike is to glide over deep snow and make snow rides just like dirt rides then you will be very disappointed. If your looking to pin snow and rail corners then you will be disappointed. Just like you, I noticed that if the snow is soft and mushy the pedaling will suck even with the fattest of tires. If the snow is super-packed then you can get away with riding your skinny bike. So what happens when you ride your skinny bike on snow is your confined your riding to the "rideable" trails. With the fatbike you can expand what is rideable and when you adapt to how it rides you'd be surprised how much more you can do.

Here's a good example of a ride I recently did. I went on a ride the other day and the trails in the lower sections had about 5" of snow and weren't packed down very well. On a skinny bike I wouldn't of gotten 5' before turning around. With the fatbike I was able to struggle through the entire trail. Once we started climbing it was very packed down and I was able to start hammering. The trail then got very steep and I could still keep pedaling. I did have some hike-a-bike but it was very tolerable. On a skinny bike I would've been fine until it got the least bit steep then my tire would dig in and I'd be walking the entire climb (or turn back). When I got to the top there was a stamped down line down some pretty long steep bits. This is where the fatbike held on nicely. It would've been impossible to ride the skinny tires on this (although I would've tried). In the end we did a 3 hour ride that I wouldn't have even attempted with the skinnybike. Yeah, it was only about 10 miles but we worked hard and had a blast. Probably the coldest beers I ever had were on that ride :)

Now dirt on a fatbike is a whole different ballgame that I wont go into. I'll just leave it as it's way more fun than you think it could be. Give it a try and you'll see.

All solid points.

A couple of weeks ago I did this ride in about 10cms of snow:

Some of it was packed, some not. I made all the climbs and the descents were a blast. On the hardest packed section I was close to my PB. Sure, the bike was sliding and slipping but it was fast, and fast is fun. I bumped into a buddy of mine who was on his fat bike, and he wasn't having that much fun (his words not mine).

That said, there are sections where a fat bike will be better than any skinny tire bike, no doubt.

Fat bikes on dirt. I remember trying 2.8" tires on my downhill bike years ago and hating it. Too wide. It was catching on all the side roots and rocks and it was throwing me off my lines and washing out when the dirt got soft. I went back and put on 2.2" dh tires and instantly I was getting all my lines, had way more grip, and cornering was precise.

Even now I will switch to a 2.25" Ardent from a 2.4" if I want a fast rolling yet more biting tire for more grip in flat hard packed corners. The smaller tire just offers a slight performance advantage in those situations. I can even feel the difference in rolling weight/resistance between the two sizes. Riding a full down hill tread here in Kamloops can be a bit more of a chore compared to an Ardent because of the extra effort in resistance. I'll put the Ardent on if I want to ride hard packed XC type trails.

To be honest, I can't see how I would enjoy riding a fat bike on dirt if I find anything over 2.4" too wide and "floaty". I'm the type of nerd that will use oil in my hub bearings instead of grease!

I also don't really see the appeal of cyclocross bikes either unless strictly for racing. Slow on the street, awkward in dirt, weird geometry… but I digress.

However, I could see if you are riding gnarly rock faces where speed is really slow and grip is paramount, then a fat bike would be awesome.

Jan. 15, 2015, 12:09 p.m.
Posts: 15019
Joined: April 5, 2007

Be interesting to see how many of those Turner fats sell.

I'd get a moto before a fat bike because I really don't need another pedal bike. Or I could go slide snow

Why slag free swag?:rolleyes:

ummm, as your doctor i recommend against riding with a scaphoid fracture.

Jan. 15, 2015, 1:10 p.m.
Posts: 1380
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Be interesting to see how many of those Turner fats sell.

I too am wondering how many King Khans Turner will sell. Particularly as they are selling them as complete bikes only, no frame only option. As a long time Turner owner/fan, I can honestly say I was disappointed to see this as their next offering. They have a big gap in their line-up between the Burner (27.5 - 140mm) and DHR that I thought would have more market-ability than a FS Fat Bike. Hope it works out for them.

Jan. 15, 2015, 1:17 p.m.
Posts: 799
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

I too am wondering how many King Khans Turner will sell. Particularly as they are selling them as complete bikes only, no frame only option. As a long time Turner owner/fan, I can honestly say I was disappointed to see this as their next offering. They have a big gap in their line-up between the Burner (27.5 - 140mm) and DHR that I thought would have more market-ability than a FS Fat Bike. Hope it works out for them.

Totally. One of my favourite bikes ever was an RFX I owned in 2005. Ever since I've been hoping they would return to relevance and produce some bikes that don't look like prototypes. A full-suspension fat bike seems awfully niche when their entire line looks dated.

There's nothing better than an Orangina after cheating death with Digger.

Jan. 15, 2015, 1:17 p.m.
Posts: 15019
Joined: April 5, 2007

It appears they were two years ahead of the pack with the DW RFX that scrapped.
Looks like the DHR is on Sale now too. So I wonder if it will be a 650B coming soon.

Why slag free swag?:rolleyes:

ummm, as your doctor i recommend against riding with a scaphoid fracture.

Jan. 15, 2015, 1:39 p.m.
Posts: 967
Joined: Feb. 28, 2014

Ok so I rode the exact same set of trails today on my Adhoc with way too much pressure in my tires. Let's just say the hard packed sections, not even close. The skinny tires were much easier to ride and faster. So much fun.

The soft sections I struggled with on the fatbike were harder on the Adhoc obviously, although I was still able to ride the descents just fine.

I suppose I'd compare the fat bike to a tractor, just plodding along getting the job done in a non exciting manner. Whereas the regular mountain bike was more like a sports car - really good in some sections, terrible in others.

If you have hard packed areas, then the regular mountain bike all day long. If your terrain is more variable, then the fat bike would be a better choice, in my opinion.

Jan. 15, 2015, 1:43 p.m.
Posts: 1380
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Totally. One of my favourite bikes ever was an RFX I owned in 2005. Ever since I've been hoping they would return to relevance and produce some bikes that don't look like prototypes. A full-suspension fat bike seems awfully niche when their entire line looks dated.

I had a 2006 RFX, and I agree one of my all time favorites. Still riding a 2012 5-Spot. If/when its time for a replacement, I'm not sure Turner would be at the top of my list anymore. Im not sure id agree that their entire line looks dated (Czar is a pretty nice Carbon 29er if thats your thing), but they are definitely needing to play catch up!

Jan. 15, 2015, 3:14 p.m.
Posts: 2121
Joined: Nov. 6, 2005

I'm not normally one to quote PB, but this sums up this whole thread nicely..

"A fellow mountain biker shitting on fat bikes is a bit like being the bearded woman in the circus sideshow and calling the sword swallower a freak. We're riding bicycles in the bush, guys… we ARE the sideshow to the large majority of the stick and ball-loving public, and that's a good thing." - Mike Levy

Its a bike, you are most probably a biker. Move along and try to have fun, whatever you brung.

Jan. 15, 2015, 4:49 p.m.
Posts: 26382
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

Are Fat Bikes the bicycle equivalent of Crossfit?

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

Jan. 15, 2015, 4:57 p.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

I'm not normally one to quote PB, but this sums up this whole thread nicely..

i like mike, and that was a good bit of editorial

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

Jan. 15, 2015, 5:19 p.m.
Posts: 2405
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Are Fat Bikes the bicycle equivalent of Crossfit?

HELL NO!!!!!

#northsidetrailbuilders

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