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Anyone Ride Fat Bikes?

Dec. 23, 2014, 8:33 p.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

I run a rigid post and fork on my On-One and find I don't need a dropper or suspension.

ooh ooh you have a fatty!

ahem, i'd be interested to hear your thoughts on it (regarding anything other than snow riding)

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

Dec. 23, 2014, 8:34 p.m.
Posts: 15019
Joined: April 5, 2007

I run a rigid post and fork on my On-One and find I don't need a dropper or suspension. Less sh!t to go wrong the better in the winter IMO … but to each their own.

It is t-shirt weather here bruh:cool:

But I you've made a valid point that I should consider. I often forget that some areas have an actual winter

Why slag free swag?:rolleyes:

ummm, as your doctor i recommend against riding with a scaphoid fracture.

Dec. 23, 2014, 11:17 p.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

For people wondering about suspension forks on fat bikes, check the MTBR fat bike forum.

Almost everyone that has been riding a while that tried suspension, went and bought one.

It is the same argument people used in the early days of suspension forks "you don't need them…"

From what I've read is that with a suspension fork is that you can run a little higher tire pressure so the tire doesn't wallow. 2 or 3" of undamped tire compression isn't equivalent to suspension.

Dec. 23, 2014, 11:19 p.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

BTW, if you are a big guy, get a frame that can take the ~5" tires.

Breaking through the crust at speed sucks.

Dec. 24, 2014, 6:39 a.m.
Posts: 2121
Joined: Nov. 6, 2005

For people wondering about suspension forks on fat bikes, check the MTBR fat bike forum.

Almost everyone that has been riding a while that tried suspension, went and bought one.

It is the same argument people used in the early days of suspension forks "you don't need them…"

From what I've read is that with a suspension fork is that you can run a little higher tire pressure so the tire doesn't wallow. 2 or 3" of undamped tire compression isn't equivalent to suspension.

Sure, suspension makes everything easier… that's why I choose to not use it in the winter. And to to be clear I ride my fat bike on singletrack as well as snow and its a blast either way. Maintenance is also significantly reduced when you are fully rigid. But the industry is pushing everyone to suspension… that's natural, but I won't go there… for now.

Dec. 24, 2014, 8:53 a.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Sure, suspension makes everything easier… that's why I choose to not use it in the winter. And to to be clear I ride my fat bike on singletrack as well as snow and its a blast either way. Maintenance is also significantly reduced when you are fully rigid. But the industry is pushing everyone to suspension… that's natural, but I won't go there… for now.

I've only ridden rigid fatbikes in the snow, so have don't have a suspension fatbike experience to compare it to. If someone is buy a bike/frame now, it makes sense to make sure that you could install a fork in the future if you wanted.

Dec. 24, 2014, 9:11 a.m.
Posts: 3518
Joined: May 27, 2008

BTW, if you are a big guy, get a frame that can take the ~5" tires.

This is what scares me about the Chromag offering. Looks like it's only good to ~4" tires.

Being cheap is OK. Being a clueless sanctimonious condescending douchebag is just Vlad's MO.

Dec. 24, 2014, 9:42 a.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

This is what scares me about the Chromag offering. Looks like it's only good to ~4" tires.

That is true of most of the local bike makers, Norco, Kona, Rocky. They are still building frames with 170mm rear hubs.

Dec. 24, 2014, 1:53 p.m.
Posts: 86
Joined: April 5, 2008

i think a trusted voice will deliver his thoughts on this quandry shortly ;)

i've been humming and hawing something similar:

http://www.planet-x-usa.com/product-p/buoofat.htm

on one fatty rolling chasis - frame, fork, wheels and tires - for $880 (plus shipping). front end is trail-slack, and the fork is suspension correct for ~100mm of travel so you don't have to commit to rigid:

looks pretty shred-able :)

Did this last winter, built it up with lots of spares. Over a couple months, swapped on a carbon fork, a Hope/Surly new rear wheel, and drilled the front rim. Swapped in some way lighter q-tubes.

The stock fork is really, really, really heavy. The rear hub is really, really heavy and crap quality. The tires are pretty good though. The tubes are boat anchors.

IMO, the frame alone is worthwhile, but the rest of the parts are really meh. Get frame, build it up with other stuff.

It's had more dirt time than snow time. It's really fun, and I'd do it again!

When I want a hardtail ride, this bike gets picked over (gasp!) my Chromag.

Hell, if I didn't already have both, the idea of one of the Chromag fattys with a Bluto and two wheelsets…

Dec. 24, 2014, 11:09 p.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

first trail ride on a fatbike (well, briefly on 2 bikes) today :)

here are a few off-the-cuff observations, for what they're worth:

  • grip and traction, especially noticeable during climbs and traverses but i'm sure they're there on descents to the same extent once you get comfortable with the bike, are ridiculous
  • despite the distinct feel of the big tires, differences in frame material and geometry were very noticeable. i'd been harboring a scheme to buy and on-one fatty frame and fork, but from my brief experience i wouldn't (personally) buy an aluminum-framed fat bike
  • the big tires were a lot easier to pedal than i'd imagined, but while i felt like i was rolling along quite well, i'm pretty sure i was working harder than usual (if that makes sense)
  • the front end took some work and effort to keep in line in all types of terrain. i'm sure i'd get used to it pretty quickly, but the feeling was quite pronounced. we speculated that the weight of the wheel/tire and the amount of compression it experienced - constantly evolving trail numbers - played a role in this

all in all a fun and interesting time. it quelled my excitement somewhat - i didn't get the same "holy shit, do want!" feeling i had on my first ride with wagon wheels - but i'd still be interested on more fat-tired trail rides. and, needless to say, i'd love to try one in the snow

that's a good looking bike. does the carbon fork have a distinct feel, or is it more of a weight thing?

edit: figured out the nice dreams reference

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

Dec. 25, 2014, 1:16 a.m.
Posts: 2030
Joined: May 2, 2004

^ riding them in snow is a pretty crazy experience, really hard learning curve trying to find what you can and can't get traction on. Super fun.

Dec. 25, 2014, 8:36 a.m.
Posts: 3518
Joined: May 27, 2008

first trail ride on a fatbike (well, briefly on 2 bikes) today :)

here are a few off-the-cuff observations, for what they're worth:

  • grip and traction, especially noticeable during climbs and traverses but i'm sure they're there on descents to the same extent once you get comfortable with the bike, are ridiculous
  • despite the distinct feel of the big tires, differences in frame material and geometry were very noticeable. i'd been harboring a scheme to buy and on-one fatty frame and fork, but from my brief experience i wouldn't (personally) buy an aluminum-framed fat bike
  • the big tires were a lot easier to pedal than i'd imagined, but while i felt like i was rolling along quite well, i'm pretty sure i was working harder than usual (if that makes sense)
  • the front end took some work and effort to keep in line in all types of terrain. i'm sure i'd get used to it pretty quickly, but the feeling was quite pronounced. we speculated that the weight of the wheel/tire and the amount of compression it experienced - constantly evolving trail numbers - played a role in this

all in all a fun and interesting time. it quelled my excitement somewhat - i didn't get the same "holy shit, do want!" feeling i had on my first ride with wagon wheels - but i'd still be interested on more fat-tired trail rides. and, needless to say, i'd love to try one in the snow

If I get one of these (highly dependant on where I get moved to after the summer), I also won't get an aluminum frame. For me, steel is real. I will admit to being hesitant though about dropping a large amount of cash on one without being able to take a good ride first. Right now, based on "internet research" and my own prejudices, the Nice Dreams and Ice Cream Truck are at the top of the list, but the smaller tires on the Nice Dreams might eliminate it from contention.

Being cheap is OK. Being a clueless sanctimonious condescending douchebag is just Vlad's MO.

Dec. 25, 2014, 9:27 a.m.
Posts: 2045
Joined: Jan. 5, 2010

If I get one of these (highly dependant on where I get moved to after the summer), I also won't get an aluminum frame. For me, steel is real. I will admit to being hesitant though about dropping a large amount of cash on one without being able to take a good ride first. Right now, based on "internet research" and my own prejudices, the Nice Dreams and Ice Cream Truck are at the top of the list, but the smaller tires on the Nice Dreams might eliminate it from contention.

Carbon.
If your thinking of dropping a large amount of money into your Fatbike, you'll probably get the most out of it being as light as possible.
Salsa makes a Mukluk Ti if your anti-plastic too.

Dec. 25, 2014, 10:39 a.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

Carbon.
If your thinking of dropping a large amount of money into your Fatbike, you'll probably get the most out of it being as light as possible.
Salsa makes a Mukluk Ti if your anti-plastic too.

small sample size admitedly, but the weight issue on fat bikes is overblown I think. i'm in pretty rough shape right now, and was half expecting the 1500g tires to kill me. but it wasn't nearly the chore to wind them up and keep them rolling that I was expectng. i imagine your talking from experience though garret. you getting some fat bike time on them thar icy plains?

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

Dec. 25, 2014, 10:50 a.m.
Posts: 86
Joined: April 5, 2008

that's a good looking bike. does the carbon fork have a distinct feel, or is it more of a weight thing?

yesnomaybe.

the difference between the two forks is near a pound and a half - made the front end feel very different just that way. fork height and angles are more or less the same as stock.

the weight and the much larger front tire (swapped on same time as the fork) likely made/makes more difference than the carbon, but either way i'm happy with it.

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