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cycling in the us from a dutch perspective

April 2, 2014, 9:50 a.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2THe_10dYs
a look at cycling in the us from a dutch perspective, which helps to show things into a fresh light given that everything he shoes/talks about looks/seems pretty standard to a north american cyclist

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

April 2, 2014, 11:16 p.m.
Posts: 20
Joined: July 22, 2010

That was interesting, thanks.

Unfortunate reality: dutch cities were designed around walking, north american cities are centred around the car. Two large outcomes I see as a result of this: 1. There are too many people that have to go too far to make a reasonable bike-commute, and 2. Car culture is totally ingrained anyway. I guess it's the same as when he says that cycling isn't really taken seriously here, like a means of transportation for children, or those who haven't really grown up.

While I wish for a more european style of commute, where my fellow cyclists aren't jockeying for position around me at the main and 10th stop light, I don't believe it will ever really happen. Ah well! On a day like today I have a hard time giving a shit. It's been a gorgeous few days for riding!

April 3, 2014, 12:04 a.m.
Posts: 204
Joined: April 21, 2006

Pre double post. Stupid, peice of shit handheld electronic device that is more powerful than your average computer from 5 years ago. Talk about inconvenient. :rolleyes:

April 3, 2014, 12:07 a.m.
Posts: 204
Joined: April 21, 2006

Amsterdam had huge car traffic issues in the 60s and 70s and got to the cycle friendly state it is now by actively planning and favouring cycling and public transport. North American cities could do this through densification and gentrification.

It is more about the "pry my car/freedom/gun/urbansprawl from my rugged individualistic cold dead hands" mentality of Americans. Where as populations within many European countries seem willing to actually solve problems based on the greater good.

Take universal health care as a non sequitur and concurrently apropos example.

April 3, 2014, 8:41 a.m.
Posts: 248
Joined: Sept. 4, 2008

Amsterdam had huge car traffic issues in the 60s and 70s and got to the cycle friendly state it is now by actively planning and favouring cycling and public transport. North American cities could do this through densification and gentrification.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuBdf9jYj7o

April 3, 2014, noon
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

^ god damn that gave me goosebumps. so good!

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

April 3, 2014, 4:20 p.m.
Posts: 815
Joined: March 13, 2004

So the Dutch pioneered the critical mass rides. That might be the motivation I need to get out to a few of those rides this year.

thanks for that.

April 7, 2014, 11:56 a.m.
Posts: 20
Joined: July 22, 2010

I went to some of the critical mass rides ~5 years ago. I want to go again as well, the basic idea is good. The negative side I have to get over is the polarization/friction it causes with the drivers. I know that's part of the point, but I do think the cyclists could be a little more respectful. Drivers that hate cyclists are going to vote against any pro-cycle infrastructure. Not that Gregor gives them much of a choice!

April 7, 2014, 1:59 p.m.
Posts: 8256
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

^^ you just gotta tell them, if I'm on my bike, its one less car in your way. Even 'mericans can understand that.

WTB Frequency i23 rim, 650b NEW - $40

April 8, 2014, 3:38 a.m.
Posts: 12804
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

On a side note:

Over here, in Germany with the increase in bikes with electric "motors"/support, the discussion about helmets and safety has erupted again,. so to speak. Weekly newsmags run articles and the like - funny and interesting bit…apparently some studies have shown that in a bike-friendly/bike-commute friendly environment riders do not necessarily need a helmet, as is pretty obvious or evident if you ever rode a bike in the Netherlands or Denmark.

"You don't learn from experience. You learn from reflecting on the experience."
- Kristen Ulmer

April 8, 2014, 2:17 p.m.
Posts: 5738
Joined: May 28, 2005

The negative side I have to get over is the polarization/friction it causes with the drivers.

if you attend a cm of a decent size, try this:

early in the ride when things are slow and compact downtown, cut to the front, get up on a newspaper box or something and count the number of cyclists who pass through a given intersection and how long it takes them. then, stick around and count how many cars get through - in all directions - in the same amount of time

i tried this a few years ago and, esp. considering how slow and clumsy a large mass seems to proceed, its staggering how many more people (on bikes) you can run through an intersection when you are ":censored: ing up" the flow of traffic vs. how many people (in cars) get through under normal circumstances

but "normal circumstances" is key to understanding the agony cm causes drivers, i think. there's a high level of unthinking entitlement that informs our understanding and expectations of driving, and cm :censored:s this all up. so, anger

but as a means of moving people (i mean traffic ) cm is an extraordinarily effective paradigm, and thus an admittedly kaleidoscopic lens that offers a view of a better world (i mean road)

"Nobody really gives a shit that you don't like the thing that you have no firsthand experience with." Dave

April 10, 2014, 8:22 a.m.
Posts: 4841
Joined: May 19, 2003

car free sundays ?

how could that ever happen here ?

Feb. 18, 2015, 9:55 p.m.
Posts: 809
Joined: Dec. 22, 2002

NSMBA member.

Feb. 25, 2015, 8:25 a.m.
Posts: 809
Joined: Dec. 22, 2002

https://twitter.com/aseasyasriding/status/570508710428028928

What mountain are you climbing?

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NSMBA member.

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