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The Untold Story of Absolute Evil... and How the Undead May Rise

May 3, 2012, 12:16 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

i do find it a bit odd that KW got hung up on his one friend's (mis)assessment/slander of our sport. i don't really give a toss what other athletes think of it, nor should i. but maybe that's what goes on for marketing types.

…Or it (should) goes on for anybody aiming to make a living within the industry. If you can't bring interest in from the outside, there's no money coming in from the outside, and you're trapped making next to nothing.

The capitalist economy is fueled by people who are passionate about what they do and are good at it. If you can't sell what you love to a large enough audience, you aren't able to make a living from the marriage of what you love and hard work, which is the most ideal situation. Working a dead end job for the man isn't anybodies ideal situation. This is '#2012'… We aren't rolling on a feudal system anymore. If somebody has the drive to produce a good product and brand image there's no reason that with enough work it shouldn't stay afloat if you can shape it to fit a large enough market.

// What's Good // F U N E R A L // Ultramontane // DEEP SIX //

May 3, 2012, 12:23 p.m.
Posts: 246
Joined: Dec. 9, 2004

point taken, but i just don't think that one person's opinion should be extrapolated to everyone else on a snowboard/moto/rollerblade/yacht.f

when i see bigger and bigger crowds showing up for crankworx in whistler and colorado, more and more multi-day endurance races being announced (and existing ones selling out in shorter and shorter time periods) i have more faith that this sport is not only where it's at, but that it's growing up and flourishing.

three cheers to KW for fighting the good fight. reminds me, i oughta buy him a pina colada for his tenacity.

RIde. Eat. Repeat.

May 3, 2012, 12:25 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

point taken, but i just don't think that one person's opinion should be extrapolated to everyone else on a snowboard/moto/rollerblade/yacht.f

when i see bigger and bigger crowds showing up for crankworx in whistler and colorado, more and more multi-day endurance races being announced (and existing ones selling out in shorter and shorter time periods) i have more faith that this sport is not only where it's at, but that it's growing up and flourishing.

three cheers to KW for fighting the good fight. reminds me, i oughta buy him a pina colada for his tenacity.

It's true that it is growing as a sport, but that one person's opinion is nowhere near a stand-alone case.

// What's Good // F U N E R A L // Ultramontane // DEEP SIX //

May 3, 2012, 12:36 p.m.
Posts: 8256
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

The fact that a bike 'brand' run by a design and marketing firm failed is of no surprise to me whatsoever. Just because you design toilet seats and ipod cases doesn't mean that you can make a good bike.

Thats the vibe i got too - big thinkers overlooking the importance of little details. Nevertheless, I hope they do well, the new bike does look good.

WTB Frequency i23 rim, 650b NEW - $40

May 3, 2012, 1:08 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Oct. 13, 2011

i read this article on 2flat a while ago, it was very inspiring in a strange, down to earth kind of way.

Cheering for the "little guy" is all fine and well, but doing only that and then go buy stuff in a big grocery store, on sale, doesn't help him/her at all. I am not saying that all of us should buy Evil bikes out of sympathy, regardless of the quality. I am pointing to bigger problem in the economy nowadays. Little guys can't live on "best wishes" alone.

May 3, 2012, 1:17 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: June 18, 2003

my 2 cents as a long time Evil Revolt owner - I've been riding my Revolt for a few seasons (I have one of the early production models) - zero issues whatsoever. Same as some other friends who have Revolts from back then and are riding them still. I know there are others that have had issues and we are fortunate to still be riding our Revolts. It remains the best-riding DH bike I've ever been on or owned (and I've ridden numerous). Still love it. I hope Evil works its way out of its troubled past and into a position where it is, once again, shaking things up for the bigger bike brands. And that those unfortunate enough to have warranty issues get to enjoy an Undead! :)

May 3, 2012, 4:29 p.m.
Posts: 2116
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

Kudos for him building a brand on an image. Really if you think about it that's what sells bikes now. He is correct in saying all bikes are built really well now. Everyone hates my Kona Operator because it's a Kona, really not a valid argument. If Kona had a different image that was cool I bet people would love them. People love the Aurum and Sessions even though they 'look' like Konas from a linkage point of view. (yes I know the differences with the fsr and split pivot) but I bet half of the people out there don't buy bikes based on that. Orange is hated on because they are single pivot but so are TR450's, Konas and Sessions in that the wheel rotates around a fixed axis. It all comes down to image, which IMO, is what makes mountain biking 'gay'. Just go ride.

May 3, 2012, 7:35 p.m.
Posts: 8348
Joined: Jan. 18, 2004

I guess I'm one of the people who can't read. I read the first few paragraphs, and I enjoyed the description and pace.

Then I noticed the GIGANTIC WALL OF TEXT and decided to complain about it here instead of keeping reading.

Good first few paragraphs though.

May 3, 2012, 8:11 p.m.
Posts: 2055
Joined: April 25, 2003

"Every bike is good these days, maybe in different ways, so people need to be thinking about what brand fits with their own beliefs and ethics."

Clearly this dude still doesn't get it. If you're product is well designed but not well produced than there's no way that people should buy it. Successful companies, the ones that deserve our hard-earned $$, are the whole package: product, support, price AND "brand".

May 3, 2012, 8:31 p.m.
Posts: 2116
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

"Every bike is good these days, maybe in different ways, so people need to be thinking about what brand fits with their own beliefs and ethics."

Clearly this dude still doesn't get it. If you're product is well designed but not well produced than there's no way that people should buy it. Successful companies, the ones that deserve our hard-earned $$, are the whole package: product, support, price AND "brand".

I think he was reffering more towards the designs offered more than the production process that goes into said bikes. What's better? My Kona made in taiwan or a handbuilt Cove Shocker?

May 3, 2012, 8:49 p.m.
Posts: 18
Joined: March 28, 2012

Having read this over on Seb's blog a while back, I'd like to give some kudos to Cam for putting it up over here.

With that out of the way, I do think that biking does suffer from a "boys club" image, and that it is very difficult to get into the sport. These days people are bombarded with meaningless acronyms, a plethora of "standards" and wheel sizes, and more marking glitz than you can shake a thru-axle at.

I think that mountain biking is on the verge of breaking out, but to become a truly respected sport, the back-biting and boys club dealings need to end. Turn the energy that used to be for hating into something positive instead.

May 3, 2012, 9:17 p.m.
Posts: 2055
Joined: April 25, 2003

I guess my point is that if price, design, production, and support were all equal (doubtful) THEN it comes down to brand ("beliefs and ethics"). I'd say that he probably has design nailed, and possibly price (I have no idea), but it's clear that he's fallen down hard on support and production and, oddly for a marketing professional, branding. As an aside, this article was the only thing that ever informed me that EVIL had production and support problems so it really seems like poor branding to be so candid.

So: better how? I'd say that since you bought the Kona it would be the Kona. For you.

For me? Well, I put a pretty strong value on price and support as I agree with him that you'll have fun on most bikes out there these days (product) and my bike dollars are very limited (price). As an example, I'd like to buy a new bike this summer, a trail niner. It'll be from a specific shop, as I have confidence in their ability to select brands that they can stand behind and I know they'll go to bat for me if something goes south (support). So, whether I choose a Stumpjumper, a Tallboy, or a Shinobi will most likely come down to price. I just don't feel like I can indulge in a more expensive handmade product with the other demands on my income, so a handbuilt bike like the Cove (or whatever is similar in the niner trail category) is likely out of the question.

"Brand" doesn't even come into the equation, but it seems to still this dudes primary (or secondary) priority. I wish him success, but I have doubts that his second kick at the can will go any better if he doesn't get his fundamentals nailed this time around.

And fuck his buddy and his concern about his opinion. Most snowboarders look pretty "gay" (seriously?) from the outside as well, but most grown ups know it's more than fashion show and stick with it once they get past the marketing BS.

May 3, 2012, 9:20 p.m.
Posts: 296
Joined: June 20, 2006

I am liking the look of that Down Tube, it looks like it has a lower protection peice and an upper protection peice which may prevent shuttle dmg from tailgates….

May 3, 2012, 9:43 p.m.
Posts: 8
Joined: Nov. 15, 2007

Sounds like a Revolution. The Establishment will not be happy.

May 3, 2012, 10:15 p.m.
Posts: 13
Joined: May 25, 2006

One of my favourite things about our readers is that you can actually read. An article like this wouldn't fly most places on the web. Being able to post articles of length and substance is one of the joys of being, like Señor Walsh, an independent operator. Great work Seb as well as Mason and Morgan.

Seb originally posted this on his personal blog, as mentioned above.

Great article Cam, please keep them coming.

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