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Performance + Durability

Worth Every Penny

Words AJ Barlas
Photos AJ Barlas
Date Sep 30, 2020
Reading time

After many years of riding, I’ve become more open-minded about the products I use. The most memorable impact has been with tires, where I moved from a strictly DHF diet to allow others into the fold. Some tires only survive a few rides but others stay on the bike until only small slivers of lugs remain. While having an open mind has been forced upon the stubborn Scottish/Taurus side of my personality, there have been occasions where it bit back. Those incidents sent me into a snickering spiral, swearing I won’t try anything new again.

Mostly, I try to ignore that side – the negative closed off jerk he can be – and the benefits have been great. New experiences, a wider group to select from – in terms of activities and products I can rely on – and an improved appreciation of how a particular item may relate to fellow riders. Below are three products that have measured up well or surprised me in the last while. They don’t stray too far from the norm and aren't necessarily the cheapest but the quality and durability make the investment worth consideration.

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18+ months of abuse and still going strong

FiveTen Impact Pro

My first ride-specific shoe was the original FiveTen Impact High. These shoes had some issues but I Ioved them anyway. Years later I ended up on what became my favourite shoe for some time but they stopped making it shortly after; the Vans Gravel. My preferences have since changed from the Gravel, which was essentially a skate shoe with a stickier sole. I still have them kicking about but I dare not ride them again for fear of ruining the memories. I already did that with childhood-T.V. favourite Nightrider. Instead, once in a while I admire them and remember the good times, despite breaking toes in them because of their slim profile. One day they’ll make their way from the depths of the shoe rack to a shelf somewhere in my office.

Before the Vans, I was a diehard FiveTen Impact fan but after them, I couldn't stand the bulk of what was their current Impact (version 2). I spent a while testing various other shoes – Sombrio, Teva, Giro – but after a few years clipped in, I arrived back at FiveTen. The shoe I returned to was the Freerider Pro with the smooth section of Mi6 rubber sole. As many know, this shoe and many of FiveTen’s products during that period had issues with durability. Like others, my Freerider Pros delaminated but I managed to salvage them for hundreds of kilometres with the help of Shoe Goo and I dare not hike in them. My experience wasn't as bad as other horror stories I've heard and it wasn’t until I wore pinholes through the sole and footbed that they were retired.

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The only wear to the outer of the shoe is around the left foot's upper. It's worn through the soft material but hasn't degraded in many months.

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My feet sit close to the cranks from trying to keep the width supported by the pedals. For some reason, the left stays put more than the right, causing it to wear.

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I also must have snagged the rear loop on something and it's torn a few threads. It's not something I find concerning after the time they've put in.

Between those and the Impact Pro here, I spent time in everything from Specialized’s 2FO (first and second gen.), Shimano’s GR9, Giro’s Riddance Mid, and Ride Concepts. The sole of this latest Impact Pro is thicker than I'd grown used to but it doesn't have the dead sensation of the early Impacts I'd matured from. The protection provided by the shoe was better than any of the options listed that I rode through this confusing and at times, frustrating time. These strike a great balance of feel and protection and I’ve happily continued riding since first reviewing them 18 months ago.

They’ve spent more than 164 rides and nearly 3,000km providing contact with my pedals and are showing wear to prove it, but I’m surprised how well they’re ageing. In terms of construction, the shoes have zero issues to show. I don’t think I’ve even had part of a stitch hanging loose which is impressive, especially given the rough patch FiveTen were in before these, a patch they appear to have made it through.

This experience has also shed light on an aspect of shoe durability I wasn’t as aware of before. Pin length has always had some influence on the lifespan of a shoe sole but the style of pin is also proving to have an effect. I typically ride with the Deity T-Mac pedal and with these, the grip and durability have been great. Time on the Nukeproof Horizon pedals, another favourite, has dwindled recently and I didn’t notice a big change in wear when they were being used. The shoes have also spent time on over-pinned ANVL Tilt V3‘s and the Pedalling Innovations Catalyst pedal but didn’t show any change in wear. Each of these pedal's pins are grub screws like the T-Mac but sharp, thin pins that aren’t grub screws have worn away at the sole more aggressively. The Chromag Dagga pedals attacked the sole and had more impact on degradation in the two months spent on them than the rest of 2020 on the Deity has. It’s something to consider if longevity out of a grippy, 160 USD pair of shoes is important.

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The sole has holes from my pedal pins but they haven't burrowed through completely, yet. I actually kind of like this, as it anchors the pins in place, providing even more stability. If it happened early in use, I'd be gutted but after the length of service these have provided, I'm fine with it.

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Otherwise, the shoes have little wear to show for their dedicated service.

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The toe box continues to protect my little piggies but isn't as round as new.

On all pedals, the Impact Pro has provided excellent grip and good feel considering the protection provided. It’s a shoe for riders who want their feet to remain in place and aren’t interested in moving about on the pedal. Racers interested in flats (are there any aside from Sam Hill, Connor Fearon or Morgan Charre these days?) will struggle to find a shoe that provides such a planted position and great protection. Bring on the chunder and worry no more about slipping a foot!

But it’s the durability of these shoes that has impressed me most. As these Impact Pros approach 3,000 kms of DH and aggressive trail riding, (and their fair share of hiking) I’m struggling to find a weakness. For that reason, I will happily buy a second pair when these finally kick the can. At that point they'll have survived more than two years of solid riding, which is great considering the grip and protection provided.

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Sweat, grease, and much more covers my current go-to helmet.

Oakley DRT5 Helmet

As with my tires, I’m unabashedly picky about helmets. Multiple versions of the TLD A1 have sat atop my head after trying one on and being impressed by the comfort. The relatively small outline and light weight of the Specialized Ambush was a favourite too. After reviewing the Oakley DRT5 I continued to switch between the three but quickly ended up mostly between the Ambush and the DRT5. I enjoyed the light weight of my Ambush, which is pre-MIPS, and honestly, I liked the white finish despite typically going for all black everything.

The Ambush began to suffer from the hottest rides and length of service, rendering the forehead pad useless. I could get a replacement but the DRT5 has removed any urgency. This coupled with the secure spot for my riding glasses had me reaching for the Oakley lid more often and now it’s protected me for more than 100 rides – over 1,500km on the bike.

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I've found air flow to be great for a full coverage helmet and believe the exhaust at the rear, which channels hot air out through the top, above the head plays a big role in this.

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The 'mechanical hooks' securely hold eyewear in place. It's one feature that has me reaching for this helmet over other options. They're also removable if glasses aren't something you wear.

I've left the ribbed silicone sweat guard in place and it has outdone any regular foam pad. In the helmet review, I noted how the ribs successfully kept sweat from the eyes and secured the fit, but I hadn’t considered the durability it could offer. It’s not clear like it was when new – the silicone has turned a smokey brown/yellow colour – but it continues to do everything as new. I can’t say that about any other foam padding after 18 months of use.

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The ribbed silicon sweat guard is another feature that has me reaching for the DRT5. It works wonders, preventing sweat from the head down into the eyes.

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It's comfortable against the forehead and also holds the helmet more securely in place. I've found it far more durable than any foam helmet pad I've used to date.

The eyewear clips continue to hold my glasses securely, preventing the loss of another pair. Clips in a helmet are foreign to most of us but now I’ve been using them long enough, I can’t imagine riding without them. They also come in handy for holding light cables, for any night riders out there. Lights and the battery also mount well thanks to the venting layout. I’ve found it very comfortable; it breathes well, and remains securely in place. The BOA 360 system still works as new, though I’ll admit I don’t adjust the snap basket very often; once or twice in the winter and similar through the summer. A friend with the black and blue size large I shot for the helmet review provides a counterpoint by adjusting the BOA every time it goes on. After the amount of adjusting he's done, the dial requires an additional tighten at the top of a long climb.

It’s not the cheapest helmet but the features offered and length of service it’s provided, with more to go, make it a worthwhile option. I expect to get another year out of the helmet and will likely replace this with another DRT5 once it’s worn or damaged from a spill. Touch wood I won’t need to worry about the latter.

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So flexible they make you wanna move!

NF DP3 Pant

Riding in long pants has seen a resurgence here on the we(s)t coast of B.C. and locally, I’ve noticed an NF logo emblazoned on many a pant covered thigh. As someone who’s grown quite tired of the cold and wet, I too began to jump back in pants whenever the temperature dropped, which around B.C. is generally any time it rains. I’ve spent winters riding in shorts but those first couple of splashes on the leg are always met with a wince and possibly a loud ‘eerrgghh.’

Last autumn I stumbled across an old pair of Race Face pants and restored their service time for the icky months. They were more comfortable and made cleanup heaps easier, removing the post-ride hose down of my legs or the occasional dirt-covered sneaky mission back into the house after a ride. With pants, I'm able to strip off, revealing my impeccably clean chicken legs, and hose the material down before wandering around the house in my (damp) underwear. Luxury!

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Fully covering up the legs is something I've been enjoying since discovering the NF DP3 pant.

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The shape of the pockets are subtly angled and work well when riding. A phone goes relatively unnoticed.

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The elastic waistband is something I was a bit leary of at first. Even with the pockets filled, they remain comfortably in place.

Then I got ahold of the NF DP3pant. I was happy with the old Race Face pants, which were at least 11 years old but the slimmer fitting, more aggressive taper and stretchy material of modern riding pants blew them out of the water. I now look for any opportunity to wear the DP3 pant and have spent days riding bike parks in warmer temps with them in addition to the cooler, wet weather rides they join me for.

The fit, material, and elastic waist have made these by far my favourite piece of riding apparel. They’re so comfy I’ve joked of how they could be traded for my trackies around the house. The pockets are shaped appropriately for access on the bike, with zippers to securely hold items in place – something like a smartphone goes relatively unnoticed thanks to their design. They don’t keep you fully dry in real rain but they deal well with showers and splashing from the trail. They've reliably submitted to much abuse and many washes and they’re manufactured by a small, local team based in Vancouver, Canada.

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Understated merino wool is now a staple in my ride collection.

Bonus: NF Halfdan Merino Wool Riding Tee

When I first stumbled across the benefits of riding in wool, the next 12 months were spent in nothing else. They were a couple of Mons Royale tops from Crankworx Rotorua in 2016 and the comfort caught me by surprise. I also appreciate the minimal styling. I still wear them regularly despite crashes and branches tearing at the material. Before them, I picked from a selection of Dri Fit tees from Hurley. I’ve never been a big fan of the typical synthetic materials used in riding jerseys and at the time many of the designs were too boisterous for my taste.

Jersey designs have improved heaps since but I still prefer something that feels, and looks, like a t-shirt. Aside from a couple of Patagonia options I regularly use, the merino Mons Royale tops and now this NF option are my preferred choices. For me, the fit of the NF Halfdan makes it a clear winner and with how good the fit of the Mons Royale tops are, that’s saying something. The length in the body, the snug neckline, and the feel of the material makes it hard to grab something else when this is clean – and often still when it's dirty.

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I've had this absolutely drenched in sweat lately and remained comfortable thanks to the wool material used. Hanging it to dry, it's been ready for another ride – a process I repeated with minimal smell for four consecutive rides.

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I'm a big fan of the understated labelling on the NF Halfdan Merino Top. The label is about 30mmx30mm and sits quietly on the lower left side. The top isn't cheap but is priced similarly to competitors. I've not had a positive experience with cheaper merino tops tried.

I usually try and get multiple uses out of my riding gear and merino helps extend this. Recently, during a hot and humid (for Coastal B.C.) stretch of weather, I pushed the length of service without a wash, using the smell of the shirt as a gauge. Granted, this is going to differ for everyone but back when I rode in a regular synthetic top, I could maybe push two–three rides in average conditions (20–25-degree weather, average humidity) but it smelt mildly on ride two and by ride three I needed to apologize to others. I was able to get four rides in hideously sweaty conditions (28–32-degree weather, high humidity) with the Halfdan top before it started to have any scent. Hanging it to dry between each ride, I was surprised how little it smelt – I even rode with it a fifth time before opting for a wash. It still didn’t smell as bad as day two in any of the synthetic tops I’ve worn in the past.

Given the lifespan of my other merino tops, I expect to get at least four years out of the Halfdan – I have more options now, so it should last longer than the Mons stuff anyway. A riding top that can be worn multiple times, fits wonderfully, is comfortable in all weather and should last a long while is well worth the 95 CAD for me. As with the NF pants, the top is made in Vancouver, Canada, not a factory somewhere in Asia.

Where to Buy AJ's Worth Every Penny Picks

The pandemic means it can be hard to find bikes, parts, and accessories. Here are some links to check out if you're interested in grabbing any of AJ's picks:

Five Ten Impact Pro

Oakley DRT5 Helmet

NF (Needs Factory) DP3 Pant and Halfdan Merino Tee

NSMB.com is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission (but that doesn't mean it'll cost you more!).

AJ_Barlas
AJ Barlas

Age: 39
Height: 191cm/6’3"
Weight: 73kg/160lbs
Ape Index: 1.037
Inseam: 32”
Trail on Repeat: Changes as often as my mood.
Current Regular: Every test product spends time on Entrail

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Comments

Bad-Sean
0
Sean Chee  - Sept. 30, 2020, 5:21 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

Bad-Sean
0
Sean Chee  - Sept. 30, 2020, 5:22 a.m.

It's a shame the Oakley tops out at 60ish cm. It's the perfect helmet for me otherwise. I leak like a sieve, wear rx glasses, and also have a 65cm head. 

Being able to clip my alternate pair (sun or clear) securely whilst on my daily ride would be amazing. The sweat band at the front sounds amazing too. Soaked foam pads are disgusting, and I have to wash them every other day even though I leave my helmet to dry in the sun after each ride. Hopefully other helmet makers adopt it asap. 

I need to get a couple of merino jerseys for my daily rides. I already only wear merino socks winter or summer for every occasion  so I know the benefits are there. It is getting warmer down under and whilst I've been happy riding in my dry fit type shirts, I can totally picture being even happier.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+2 Sean Chee Pete Roggeman
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:08 a.m.

It would be nice if they offered an XL, hey. A friend with a large noggin has found the size L DRT5 comfy, I'll find out what size his head is, maybe that will be of some help. 

Definitely up your comfort with some merino jerseys mate. Just like your experience with the socks, they're great year-round and if you get a simple design like the NF here, you can wear it casually too.

Reply

Bad-Sean
+2 Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas
Sean Chee  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:17 a.m.

Thanks, I gave my friends large a go and it was way too small for me. I was gutted. 

I wonder if there's an aftermarket opportunity for someone to make the silicon fore head bands for other helmets?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 AJ Barlas Graham Driedger
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 1, 2020, 5:48 a.m.

Interesting idea...I'd buy aftermarket pads for sure.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Sandy James Oates
Andy Eunson  - Oct. 1, 2020, 8:26 a.m.

Not silicone but microfibre. https://www.traxfactory.com/sweat-buster

I’ve tried those Halo headbands, a little gutter thing (long time ago) but these sweat busters are the only thing that works for me.

Reply

hbelly13
0
Raymond Epstein  - Oct. 1, 2020, 11:12 a.m.

I have the DRT5 and it's sweat gutter works as advertised. However, if like me you ride in deep south humidity and/or Niagara Falls comes off the top off your pate the gutter will get overwhelmed quickly with sweat pooling and then dumping over the front. I've tried both external solutions like the Gut'r and the Velo Strip too. Both were okay at best and neither are that comfortable nor practical. However, I recently found a far more simple solution that can be used with any helmet. Much less expensive and surprisingly more effective as well. The Wickflow headband https://wickflow.com/product/2-pack/ with it's wicking material and silicone bead is the best I've used. It's super thin and doesn't mark your forehead like the Oakley does (not a big deal, but annoying). The wicking material and bead work in conjunction so you don't get sudden overflows like all the others. Instead your sweat flows steadily out the sides without pooling. After the ride when you take it off you can wring out the excess sweat and hang it to dry (I spray mine with an essential oil/aromatherapy mist) for the next ride.

Reply

boomforeal
+1 Pete Roggeman
boomforeal  - Sept. 30, 2020, 5:42 a.m.

i feel like i've been looking for over a year for a pair of riding pants suited to my/our body type. what size DP3 do you wear, AJ?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 Endur-Bro
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:09 a.m.

Hey mate, I'm in a size medium. I was concerned the elastic would make these a hard fit for my lank build but they stay on great, even when the pockets are loaded. I highly recommend!

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:58 a.m.

ditto! hard to find a nice slim/long fit. nf is currently at the top of my pending pant purchase list. i assume the berzerker would be a more suitable wet season choice, or does the dp3 offer adequate weather resistance for our mild(er) climate?

Reply

denomerdano
+3 Endur-Bro AJ Barlas Graham Driedger
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 30, 2020, 11:51 a.m.

5'9" here with 30-32 waist and I fit comfortable in Medium Destroyers (DP3 means Destroyer Pants V3)

Berzerkers were too warm for most riding on the shore. Unless you were shuttling only and It is around freezing.. with rain..

Im always looking for an excuse to wear my NF pants and they work really well for commuting..

Reply

lefthandlewis
+1 Pete Roggeman
lewis collins  - Sept. 30, 2020, 6:13 a.m.

ah I wish the Vans Gravel came back! They were so good for feel and grip, as well as just fitting my feet well. Gutted I didn't hunt down a few pairs when I could. I feel like there were definitely a shoe before their time, and would be an instant hit these days.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:11 a.m.

Yeah, I remember searching high and low for some 10.5 US ones to stockpile when I learnt they were going to stop production but there was nothing. They weren't the easiest to find to begin with so I guess that's why there was nothing so quickly. You aren't wrong, they could kill it today!

Reply

Andeh
+1 Fred Phillips
Andeh  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:31 a.m.

Wow, your Impact Pro soles are holding up a lot better than mine.  Maybe it's cause you are rotating pedals, and I've been on the exact same ones?  My current pair I got in February have some pretty deep holes where some of my pins go.  Hard to say how much I've done on them, I'd guess about 950 miles / 210k ft vert.  They still grip really well, and like you said it makes it easy to position your feet on the pedals.  But I have noticed that I'm starting to have a bit more foot soreness on descents, which might be coming from having less cushion on those pins.  I did snag a backup pair of them when they were on sale to switch to when I decide they're finally done.

The NF pants look nice.  I've got some buddies with the Oakley helmet that complain that heavy sweating can overflow the gutter, causing a literal shower of sweat down into your eyes.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Oct. 1, 2020, 7:01 a.m.

Interesting Andeh. Considering you run the same pedals I wonder if it’s terrain, riding style, or even climate that’s had them wear differently?

Also interesting to hear about the overpowering of the silicon gutter in the helmet? A mate who used to wear a bandanna every ride, to help soak up some of the sweat, has found it to work unreal also. I find that when it’s super hot my face will sweat into my eyes but the silicon pad has continued to do it’s job.

Reply

JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:40 a.m.

do you wear knee pads under the pants AJ? they look like the ideal length, what is your inseam?

Reply

shapethings
0
shapethings  - Sept. 30, 2020, 9:45 p.m.

I have the previous Dp2 version and my Leatt 3DF 6.0 knee pads fit no problem. Love riding in pants.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Oct. 1, 2020, 6:50 a.m.

Yep, james, I always wear pads. Even had a set of 7iDP Sam Hill pads on in the photos. Spent the day with my Leatt 3DF 6.0 under them recently with no issues.

Reply

JVP
0
JVP  - Sept. 30, 2020, 11:30 a.m.

I'm due for a new helmet. So I take it the Oakley fits narrow heads fairly well?  Your noggin shape looks similar to mine, and the glass holder might be a killer app. I'm a pair of glasses away from being able to ride packless on many single water bottle rides.  Too sweaty to wear glasses on the ups unless humidity is quite low.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Oct. 1, 2020, 6:51 a.m.

I have a narrow head, yeah. A mate who has a larger, rounder head finds it comfy too.

Reply

Zowsch
0
Zowsch  - Sept. 30, 2020, 1:58 p.m.

I do like my DRT5 but it is a very heavy lid. I am also unable to prop it up higher on my forehead for climbs to get a bit more air on an otherwise covered area. Obviously it sits right where it should for maximum protection. The sweat band is a major asset though. Overall I am very happy with it.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Oct. 1, 2020, 6:52 a.m.

Agreed, it’s not the lightest, that’s also part of why I kept swapping between it and my Ambush. Now I don’t notice the weight as it’s all i wear.

Reply

jonas-dodd
+1 AJ Barlas
Jonas Dodd  - Sept. 30, 2020, 2:34 p.m.

I've had a pair of FiveTen impact pros for 2 years and they are holding up better than AJ's, although they have about half the miles on them. My previous shoes were the impact VXi and I too kept them going for an extra season with shoe-goo.

I have yet to pick up any NF gear but my next  gear purchase will be from them. I'm really hoping they make a 3/4 sleeve version of the merino T-shirt!

Reply

Endur-Bro
0 AJ Barlas ChocolateThunder
Endur-Bro  - Sept. 30, 2020, 3:06 p.m.

I got on the NF DP3 pant program a few weeks ago and some of the hemp tees. I had the same hang ups about the stretchy no adjustable waist. Yet at 1.75m and 80kg the mediums just fit myself perfectly. The wide waist stays put and keeps my muffin too on check. I wish I hadn’t held out for so long as the khaki colour from spring was straight fire. I’m looking at the Bezerker for real wet weather and road cycling wear rather than paying the Squamish GTX tax. 

Picked up 5.10 Trailcross Mids so I’ll try the flats program again this fall/winter/spring. 

Looking to replace my TLD A1 and this fit pending this Oakley helmet might take the cake. Although the Giro Tyrant is up there as well.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Oct. 1, 2020, 6:54 a.m.

How ya likin’ the Trailcross Mids, Endur-bro? Quite keen to check ‘em out.

Reply

paulc
0
paulc  - Sept. 30, 2020, 4:12 p.m.

The Destroyer pant looks like it would serve double duty as a good Nordic ski pant with style and functionality.

Reply

grcgrc
0
grcgrc  - Sept. 30, 2020, 10:34 p.m.

What is the inseam length on those pants? Everyone seems to have settled on something along the lines of 80 - 81 cm. For those of us with legs longer than that (I have an inseam of 90 -91 cm), we ride along as if the next flood is imminent when we attire ourselves in the available goods. Now this may be true here in the PNW, but I would like my pants to fit a little closer to my actual inseam length.

And as for five-ten footwear. The most uncomfortable shoes I have ever purchased. I even acquired some insoles for the pair I bought. Only helped a little. And what is their issue with having something to hold your heel down? The pair I have put the foam so far down it is as if they believe heels start one or two centimetres above the sole of my foot.

Reply

jan
0
Jan  - Sept. 30, 2020, 11:04 p.m.

I had seen (consumed?) a lot of hype about NF gear last year about this time and eventually bought a pair of Berzerkers which I rode in most of November-January. Fit and function was great, but I was incredibly disappointed to see the crotch fabric/seams blown out after what could hardly be considered a riding season. Maybe they're, ahem, "shuttling only" pants? Either way, fool me once, RideNF.

Reply

danimaniac
+2 Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas
danimaniac  - Oct. 1, 2020, 2:45 a.m.

did you talk to them about it? Seems like they are approachable folks that would be interested in really satisfying their customers.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 1, 2020, 5:50 a.m.

Definitely contact them, Jan, I'm sure they'll make it right.

Reply

Gdreej
+1 Pete Roggeman
Graham Driedger  - Oct. 1, 2020, 8:39 a.m.

NF is fantastic with quick turnaround repairs. My Invader World Series shorts waist webbing came apart at the bond to the main fabric, and the repair was completed in one hour! Now that's service.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Oct. 1, 2020, 8:31 a.m.

I really like that Oakley helmet and bought one. I wore it at the store with my riding glasses and the next size up too. Wore it for a good ten minutes. Bought it. Wore it and discovered that after more than ten minutes it was painful. After 30 minutes it was excruciating. Those yellow buttons that hold the mips in were digging into my head. Being between sizes in helmets makes it hard for me to get a good fit. When I did wear it I found that the silicone brow pad only marginally better than straight foam. I sweat huge though. I easily drop one or two kilos of sweat in a hot ride. Per hour.

Reply

ehfour
0
ehfour  - Oct. 1, 2020, 10:15 a.m.

Not sure if you mentioned it in the review above- I skimmed

@AJ Barlas: Did you pay for a portion of these products? or were all of them provided as products to review?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 1, 2020, 12:31 p.m.

Hi there, ehfour - NSMB's reviews are based on items we are sent to review. However in this case it is possible AJ bought those shoes - I do think he mentions re-purchasing them.

If someone buys a product and reviews it, you have to watch out for a self-confirmation bias. That's why we don't accept guest reviews. If you shell out a lot of money for a bike, it's likely you're going to love it, right? This article is an exception to that policy, however, in the case of less expensive items like clothing, you can trust a seasoned gear editor like AJ.

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ehfour
+1 AJ Barlas
ehfour  - Oct. 1, 2020, 1:17 p.m.

Thanks Pete, that's great clarification for us who love NSMB and the reviews that the team does..esp AJ

I trust AJ (and NSMB) reviews, as they reflect my real world experiences.

Your review of the V1 and V2 Sentinel is exactly my same on bike exp

Thanks again and keep up the great work

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mb
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Mikey Bikey  - Oct. 5, 2020, 8:36 p.m.

The 510 uppers are quality/stout and last longer than the soles, which get chewed up by the pins. Anybody tried resoling them or is it not worth it?

Appreciate the info on the pants AJ. Sounds like they beat jeans some of us cheapsters wear. Might have to pull the trigger.

thnx

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AJ_Barlas
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AJ Barlas  - Oct. 22, 2020, 11:49 a.m.

In a shoe review article I wrote a while back the discussion of re-soling, or even having a 510 sole added to a different shoe, came up. In the end, it seemed that there are very few outfits offering to resole with 510 Stealth Rubber. From what I gathered, adidas aren't keen on selling the kits to shoe repair shops now. A shame because it would save chucking out these when the sole eventually dies. As you say, the uppers are stout and will go on for quite a while.

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mb
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Mikey Bikey  - Oct. 23, 2020, 12:46 p.m.

IIRC the problem was getting something close to the original molded up the side look. 

510 sold soles that glued on the bottom, but at $50 for the sole and $50 for the repair, I was almost back at the original price of $109 with no idea if it would work in the long run.

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