Dissent Nano Socks NSMB Andrew Major
WORTH EVERY PENNY

Worth Every Penny: September 2022

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major (Unless Noted)
Date Sep 20, 2022
Reading time

Legends Of The Falls

September used to be one of my favourite months. It often has some of the best trail conditions of the year, things have cooled down and the forest smells great. It's bittersweet now that my daughter is in school. September means daily routines and multiple hockey practices. Big days on bikes morph into quick rides sandwiched between the last bell of the day and dinner.

This September has seemed particularly rancorous. The transmission in my car crapped out for the third time, while moving at speed with my kid in the vehicle, and Ford says it will be over a year for the warranty replacement to arrive. The recovery from my Achilles injury in January has gone from the epic progress I enjoyed all summer to gains akin to trench warfare. But, as I say to my kid, "give me your solutions, not your problems." So here's some stuff I use regularly that makes me smile.

Flat Pedal Shape OneUp NSMB Andrew Major (6)

I've been wearing Dissent Labs Nano Pro 'Ski' socks while riding and turning wrenches since June. I've not bought in to the knee-high compression sock look, but I can't argue with the difference they make to circulation.

Dissent Labs Nano Pro 'Ski' Socks

I'm not a fan of proper 'Pro' fitted compression socks and I don't like knee high socks. So what could be better than combining the two? And yet I've bought four pairs of Dissent Labs Nano Pro Ski socks since June. Two pairs are fairly shredded - they will lose if you snag them on a pedal pin - and I'll be replacing those despite the cost of entry. Despite the 'ski' moniker these are super thin as they're intended for high-output back country use. Your local bike shop probably doesn't have them in stock, which is silly because if you're wearing compression socks to enhance circulation the knee-high setup works way better than calf-height.

They look silly with shorts but mountain bikers all wear pants now anyway. I still had to get over myself though. After all, I'm an adult riding bikes in the forest so there's an innate level of silliness going on already.

I started off wearing these all day every day to help manage the extensive swelling I was getting in my bad leg, never mind trying to get back into riding. As daily swelling has decreased, I've transitioned to just wearing them for riding, long hikes, and days turning wrenches where I know I'm going to be on my feet for hours at a time.

I still don't like the feeling of compression socks, but I will say that even with my good leg I've noticed a reduction in fatigue from standing all day and the numb foot I used to get on longer rides is now gone. I'd love to make bold claims about reduced fatigue or lactic acid build up when pumping down trails on the hardtail but the truth is I haven't ridden without these socks on since June so have no frame of reference. I am wondering if I'll have fewer issues managing cold feet on the wettest rides this winter thanks to improved circulation, but that's probably wishful thinking.

I'd recommend these socks for a lower body injury recovery, or for folks who don't have the best circulation. Just be warned that if your friends are like my friends you will get made fun of if you combine them with shorts.

Mission Workshop Merino Hoodie

It's been heavily worn, washed, crashed, crumpled and the sleeves are ratty as all get out, but after a decade of hard use, I still reach for this thing regularly. It transitioned years back to being a mostly mountain bike piece now that it's in rough shape. Mission Workshop doesn't sell a Merino wool hoodie anymore so it's not replaceable. This one was USA Made and the quality of workmanship and materials is tops. It's not a light piece and I wouldn't call it 'stashable,' though I do strap it to the outside of my pack if the temperature goes from crisp to toasty.

I couldn't tell you what this piece cost, my wife bought it for me as a gift over a decade ago. It's nowhere near as soft as it was but it's still a great piece. Even in the rain I'll often wear it under my weatherproof vest as opposed to a full-sleeved hardshell jacket. It's warm enough, breathable enough, and proven durable enough over years of riding and crashing and there's a good chance if you bump into me on my commuter or mountain bike from September to June that I'll be wearing it. Every time I pull it out of the closet, where it shares a hook with my CoreRat vest and 7Mesh weatherproof vest, it makes me smile. That's about as good a gift as you can get.

Mission Workshop Merino Hoodie NSMB Andrew Major

The made in Kamloops clothes hanger sporting my decade-old MUSA Mission Merino hoodie.

Mission Merino Hoodie NSMB Andrew Major (3)

For how often I wear this piece there are surprisingly few photos. Here's one on Lower Crippler (thanks for all your work Andy!). Photo: JacVenture

Wolf Tooth 6-Bit Key Chain

I've written more extensively about the 6-Bit Key Chain as part of Everyday Bicycle Tools as well as the various generations of Wolf Tooth’s 8-Bit Pack Pliers. They're my favourite shop quality packable tools and they continue to evolve. I always have my Leatherman Skeletool with me as well, but where my knife and pliers count as every day carry (EDC) tools, my 6-Bit is an every day use (EDU) item.

The black coating on the bits I use most has worn away on all the sharp contact edges and I constantly find myself fixing things I would otherwise have forgotten five minutes later. Often that's bike related stuff but it's crazy how many hex key and Torx-compatible interfaces you'll come across in your daily life when you have a tool with you all the time.

I use my 6-Bit Key Chain all the time, and I seem to lend it to others almost as often. It's really nice to be that guy at the coffee shop when you overhear someone say "this bolt on my shopping buggy is loose, I meant to tighten it at home." Most folks don't carry tools around with them, so it's a chance to be helpful and have a positive impact on other peoples' days.

Everyday Tools NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

If this 6-Bit tool had a decent sized knife blade I wouldn't even bother to carry my Skeletool. I use it more than any tool I own, only because it's always in my pocket.

Wolftooth 6Bit NSMB Andrew Major

The bits I use most commonly have a neat patina where the sharp edges are thinly polished and the body of the tool shows a bit of wear as well just from daily use.

North Shore Rack

This is the second time in my life I've paid full pop for a North Shore Rack, having sold my last one years ago when I switched to a tailgate pad for my truck. Things have changed a lot since the days of picking up from the house in Lynn Valley and yet the very friendly customer service remains and the locally made product has seen some small but obvious improvements to bicycle fitment and paint finish since the last time I purchased one.

This acquisition started out as nothing more than a doubly unnecessary expunging of hard earned cash. First, as noted above, my car died and along with it my capacity to transport bikes for work, mix-mode commuting, and mountain biking with my family. Then, despite Ford coming up with money for the local dealer to put us in a loaner vehicle, the folks at Cam Clark Ford flat out refused to consider any number of ways to provide a vehicle that could properly act as a replacement for said car. That would be by simply having the ability to transport bikes either by adding a roof rack or a hitch, with me offering to provide the actual racks. Ask me if I'm bitter.

Thankfully, we're in a position where we could buy a used vehicle as a replacement. I know exactly enough about cars that I'm an expert at what I don't know so I took my own advice, Buyer Beware, and leaned on friends who actually know what they're talking about to get sorted with something that works for my family, which in turn meant acquiring a hitch rack.

I ordered on their website for local pick up and then rolled quickly by their shop between work and grabbing my kid at school to bolt it in place. These things aren't cheap though I certainly think the price is justifiable.

I was in a funk as I stepped out of my new-to-me car and walked into North Shore Racks where I was greeted by the happiest, friendliest, most obviously kind hearted human being named Dylan. You're rad Dylan, thank you for your help and the nice chat.

North Shore Rack NSMB Andrew Major (1)

I have zero empirical evidence, but based on what I've seen it's my feeling that this is the superior way to to mount bicycles to a vertical carrier but it can result in some cosmetic wear to fork crowns.

North Shore Rack NSMB Andrew Major (4)

I've seen a few cleaner looking methods adopted to keep the front wheel from spinning while driving, but nothing is faster and cheaper than a bargain-priced bungee.

I knew I wanted the simplicity of a vertical bike mounting solution and of those racks on the market the only choice I considered was NSR. Sure, they're really nice folks, and the product is made here in North Vancouver, and the after sale support is excellent if you ever need a fresh rope or an anti-rattle washer, but for me the deciding factor is how my bike is held. Namely the fact that it is captured by the fork crown not the front wheel.

I have a few buddies who'll be shaking their fists like an angry old man meme because their fork crown had some paint rubbed off but it's a f***ing mountain bike gentlemen, go RideWrap yourselves. I don't have any proof beyond my own two eyes, anecdotal interest, and basic reasoning, but it's remarkable how many folks who've never had issues with fork bushings getting sloppy are suddenly experiencing premature wear and also have a 'contactless' vertical bike rack. No suspension manufacturer seems to have anything to say about it at this time, but I'm not sure that's saying anything. Potential crown wear versus potential bushing wear may not affect anyone else's purchasing decisions but it was a deciding factor for me.

The rack is so solid and basic that it's doubtful anything will come up that I can't just take care of myself. My last one was faultless from the day I bought it to the day I sold it. My brother would say the same about his, and there was only one rack in mind when I bought this new beauty.

North Shore Rack NSMB Andrew Major (3)

A friend once told me that all mountain bikers are Peter Pan chasing the Fountain Of Youth. I'm not certain if he was blending metaphors but there may have been a few beers involved. Either way, it's my excuse for the fact that I still love stickers.

North Shore Rack NSMB Andrew Major (2)

No I don't drive with my helmet like this, but I hung it up for a moment and was briefly struck by the fact that this bike rack and lid costs almost as much as the Marin San Quentin 1 that's hanging on it. I have a few rides to go before I can finish the write up on this machine. It's funny looking at it sitting next to the Arrival - 1,350 versus 11,500 CAD.

Worth Every Penny

I don't have a link to an equivalent to my Mission hoodie, though if this one went missing I'd be trying to replace it. Someone must have one in a closest somewhere that doesn't fit them anymore?

If your local ski shop supports back country touring or hitting the circuit on your misery sticks then they very likely stock Dissent Labs' Nano Pro 'Ski' socks. You can also order the Nano Pro direct for 55 USD.

I've been seeing Wolf Tooth products, including their 8-Bit lineup, more often at local shops and your preferred dealer can order whatever tool option you're looking to pick up. There's more information about the 6-Bit, as well as all the individual replacement parts, at Wolf Tooth.

You can get more information about North Shore Racks' products and order directly at NorthShoreRacks.com.

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Comments

Timer
Timer
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+5 Bikeryder85 Zero-cool Vik Banerjee Niels van Kampenhout NewGuy

The funny thing about the Wolf Tooth (and other) MTB bit tools is that they are super convenient everywhere except when mountanbiking or doing outdoor activities.

Reply

Zero-cool
Zero-cool
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Timer

You mean in the dark woods when you drop the most important bit and have an “ah, fuggit!” Moment?

Reply

Bikeryder85
Bikeryder85
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Timer

I remember reading a racers blog where he got so tired of losing bits in the moment that he paired down his entire bike to three Allen key sizes, then cut down three full size Allen keys to fit in his homemade tool pouch.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I appreciate this. The Arrival actually goes a long ways towards almost every bolt you’d probably need to adjust on the trail being a T-25 Torx. 

If they made the axles and crank bolts and pivot hardware T-30 I could see riding it with one tool that was a T-25 that pushed through (stepped up) to a T-30.

But that still wouldn’t cover every eventuality.

————

I could ride my single speed with nothing but a 5mm hex-key and tighten/straighten most anything I need to get home. Actually, that’s my most used stashed tool, but there are still plenty of things that can go wrong in the woods and I’d always rather fix them than walk if I can.

Riding with a pack - not a weight weenie - I see no reason not to have both. I have a quick access 5mm and I have a full on 8-Bit setup that has chain breaker, plugs, quick links, and every fitting I could need for my rig.

Reply

ThadTheRad
Jake Smith
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I've built up a couple singlespeeds with nearly every fastener (within reason) used a 5mm, even had a 5mm allen key taped to the seattube near the BB that I never actually needed to use. Was quite convenient, and the peace of mind going out the door for a quick rip without worrying about if I have tools was pretty great.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Vik Banerjee

I think when it comes to conveniently resolving most issues you can’t beat an EDC Light tool from OneUp. So quick and easy and faff free to use. For lots of folks I know that’s what they have and if something else comes out they walk.

If you’re on a trip or a ride and your only tool is any bits-in/bits-out setup that would get annoying for minor adjustments if any come up. 

But if you legitimately want to be able to fix anything that comes up there’s not a nicer to use, more compact, or better equipped system. In that way I think the relative convenience is in whether you’re riding or walking out. Most stuff, said EDC Light is going to have the job done before I get the 8-Bit out of my pack, but it would also have left me (or fiends) walking on more than one occasion, so it’s nice to have both.

Case in point, if I need to straighten my stem after a crash I just reach for my stashed 5mm. But yesterday I came across something I’d never seen before in the shop or on the trail, SRAM master cylinder bladder-cover bolts that had backed out, and in my pack I had a tool to fix that.

Reply

sverdrup
sverdrup
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I hear lots of love for the EDC Light, but not much about the little Specialized tool that attaches to their bottle cages.  I have used one for many years with no issues - including the same bottle cage.  Am I missing something with the OneUp? Any reason folks don't seem to use the Specialized much?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Both in the cage mount and in the steerer tube (as neat as the spring loaded system is) I’ve come across too many of those Specialized tools that were rusted beyond use. On the other hand in a headtube or in a pump I’ve never seen an EDC tool that was cooked despite interacting with significantly more OneUp setups.

It’s probably not a concern in California where they’re based but it keeps me from recommending them for here.

Reply

sverdrup
sverdrup
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Makes sense to me. I ride year round in western OR and haven’t had this issue though - I must have gotten a good one!

Reply

Onawalk
Onawalk
1 week, 6 days ago
0

I do have this small issue, that keeps presenting itself. The bolts that hold the tool together seem to unwind themselves slightly.  Once this happens the tool becomes very difficult to remove.  I’m sure a little locktite would cure this, but it’s a bit of an oversight for sure.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 1 day ago
-1 Kelownakona

The Specialized tool is pretty great, but not as fast and easy to pull out as the EDC Lite. Also, it's not protected from mud and water on the bottom of your cage, whereas the EDC Lite is snuggled up in your head tube. Lastly, OneUp gets points for being a small brand in Squamish.

Reply

Kelownakona
Kelownakona
1 week, 5 days ago
0

Maybe 10 years ago. Hardly a small brand now. Outsourced manufacture, global shipping options and soon to be bought out by mega-umbrella Pon holdings.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I've got a small multi-tool that wouldn't meet my 100% on trail bike maintenance needs, but could be the better choice for stashing in my "gas tank" frame bag up by my stem. The bag provides quick access and the tool flips open fast to deploy the small number of tool options it has. It was really cheap as well.

I was keeping the WT tool there, but perhaps that's not the right strategy for fast tweaks and handing off to other people on the trail.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

It’s fairly rare I need a tool on a ride but I still like to have my 8-Bit in the tool roll and and a simple tool for quick stuff.

Actually one legit fault with my setup I’d never considered until recently is that my tubeless plugs are buried, except on my V2 where they live in the handlebar. It can make a big difference to get a plug in before all the air leaves your tire.

Reply

TheCrimp
OscarN
2 weeks ago
0

If you need a blade and a bit driver, I like the Gerber Armbar slim drive.  I use it for Backcountry skiing and keep all the relevant bits in a separate little box.

I have a regular old multi tool strapped to the bike (Toprak Alien II) because it refuses to die.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I like a lot about the WT tools except the part where I am trying to extract the bit I want from the storage compartment. It's hard [they don't want to come out easily] and since it's black on black I sometimes need a few tries to get the one I want. Not a fatal flaw, but somewhat annoying. I haven't dropped any of the bits yet, but that would be a drag hunting for them. The bits in storage are pretty secure so it's mostly the one in play that could get dropped.

Reply

Bikeryder85
Bikeryder85
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 Vik Banerjee Kelownakona

I've got to say, that Arrival is probably the best looking carbon wonder bike I've seen. I'm normally one for skinny steel tubes, but that thing is mint.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Kelownakona

I've seen two on the trails now and they do look quite nice.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

It manages to be very unique without becoming unsightly in a way only a fanboy could love. 

Particularly interesting is how, like a super car, it looks truly rare and expensive to folks who don’t know anything about mountain bikes. They’ve obviously captured something universal-cool in the aesthetic.

(Even looks great with socks hanging on it)

Reply

IslandLife
IslandLife
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 Andrew Major vantanclub

One of the biggest things that keeps me a super fan of Northshore racks... is how small and light it is.  We use our main vehicle for a ton of family things other than mountain biking and so it ends up off the vehicle as much as it's on.  But it's so easy to take off, move around and put back on.  It's so simple that it often gets stored inside.  And when ski season hits, it lives in our utility room for about 4 to 5 months of the year.  The 4 bike rack is only 50 lbs.  Even when we do leave it on... fold it down, adjust the angle and we can still open and close our SUV hatch and it's generally not very in the way.  I see quite a few people moving to those monster wheel cradle racks... the things are gigantic, heavy and always in the way.  The lightest Velocirax is 85 lbs!!  To each their own... but no way I'll dealing with one of those monsters.

My north shore rack has been so easy to use and simple yet bomb proof for 4 years now.  Not a lot of people realize the tines can be bent/adjusted (if you don't have the newer model) to fit bigger headtubed bikes as I know some have had issues with that.   I also haven't seen any crown wear yet... but I tend to flip the family bikes within a couple years... maybe that's why?  And my bike is always ride wrapped.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
1 week, 6 days ago
0

It’s funny, the new tine configuration fits suspension forks better (all the ones I’ve tried) but it doesn’t fit my rigid fork as well and the old. Been thinking of bending one set to fit my rigid better.

Hadn’t considered relative weight. Good point.

Reply

Stihlgoin
Stihlgoin
1 week, 6 days ago
+2 Andrew Major goose8

I absolutely agree regarding the durability of the Leatt 2.0 shoes.  We picked up some for our son as a more weatherproof alternative to Shimano GR7s when it got cold and wet last year.  Not only were we able to find them at a great discount, they took some serious weather abuse without flinching.  We ended up purchasing a second pair (again, at a discount) to rotate between wet and dry pairs.  They are a bit warm for summer, but the Shimanos go back on for warm weather.  He feels the grip is good enough for flat pedal trials riding.  The sole is stiffer than Shimano by a bit, if anyone is thinking of trying them.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
1 week, 6 days ago
+1 Stihlgoin

I'll certainly pick up another pair of these when they're toast. They've been great. I don't notice them being particularly hot but it's been a while since I had a set of GR7s to compare myself. 

An interesting note regarding stiffness as I noticed it as well, but I run insoles in all my shoes so the difference was muted by that.

Reply

mrbrett
mrbrett
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Mammal

Andrew, I use a 5" long strip of velcro on my front brake lever to stop my front wheel from spinning on my rack - on longer drives. Takes 1 second to put on while loading. Short drives I just let it spin.

Reply

morgan-heater
Morgan Heater
2 weeks ago
+1 Kelownakona

Are folks worried about wearing out their bearings? I've never bothered to lock them down.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
0 mrbrett Kelownakona

I mean, sure it’s unnecessary revolutions, and with a slightly bent rotor it could be wearing down pads too. The big thing for me is I just hate looking in the rear view and seeing the wheels spin.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

That’s a clean solution. Toe-clip strap could be good too. Do you just leave the Velcro on your rack so it’s always ready? That was another key bungee advantage over other solutions. The last thing I need is another thing to remember.

Reply

mrbrett
mrbrett
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Andrew Major

Yeah I just have four Velcro strips (for my four bike rack) permanently wrapped around the bar or upright support on the rack.

If it upsets your brake bleed, you needed one anyway! 

And two or three ski straps, just in case I get into a rough but still high speed shuttle road. Load stability.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Ski straps are on my list to have in the car anyway, so I’ll keep that in mind re. length. Thanks.

Reply

DanL
DanL
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I'm guessing you have access to hair bands - those slip straight onto the handlebar/brake levers

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
+1 DanL

Hahaha… the amount of trouble I’d be in.

IslandLife
IslandLife
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I just always have my bikes cable locked while they're on the rack to stop thefts of convivence.  Kills two birds as I run it through the front wheels which stops the spinning.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
1 week, 6 days ago
0

I cable lock bikes but rear wheel/frame so I still need to restrict front wheel.

mammal
Mammal
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 IslandLife

Misery Sticks. I haven't heard that term outside of my group of masochist friends who skate ski. I seem to be one of the last of the group who still drags myself up to Cypress for the cardio slaughter at least once per week. There is no better term than Misery Sticks.

NSR... I picked mine up last spring, after a rear-ender settlement allowed an upgrade. I love the thing. Bomb proof solid, and loading/unloading with a group of hooligans is a piece of cake. My buddy Joe is also deeply entrenched in the company, so I'd take flack if I chose the competition. Local wins.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 Mammal IslandLife

I know a fair few XC skiers - not one myself - so I picked up the jargon. It is a great term.

New car already reads 2x the KMs of our Ford but hoping to be towing this NSRack behind it a decade from now.

Reply

mammal
Mammal
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Purely out of interest sake, what vehicle did you pick up?

Reply

mrbrett
mrbrett
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

If he stays on brand it would be a single speed-no suspension-flotation (plus) tire'd car - hand built in Vancouver.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
0

It’s had enough work done that I probably could claim it was made here. Hahahaha.

———

Between my car knowledge and the current used car market (high prices / low selection) it wasn’t an easy choice. Especially since I was trying to get an old enough vehicle to avoid the early obsolescence of a cellphone-on-wheels but something with low enough KMs and reliable enough to act as our one vehicle.

Anyway, my friend Mechanic-Mark had an older Xterra that he rebuilt that drives super tight so we picked that up. It’s more vehicle than I’ve owned in a long time but it’s lovely to drive (like, so nice) and he clearly did a great job on it. We love it. 

We walk to the grocery store already, but we’re also busing and cycling more to offset the extra cost of gas.

Reply

eriksg
eriksg
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I know lots of people who love the old Xterra. My high school best friend had one, in yellow no less, always thought it was a cool rig. I hope it serves you well and reliably. (Disclaimer: I work for the company now, but didn't when that model was last produced.)

andy-eunson
Andy Eunson
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Andrew Major

I have two Mission Workshop hoodies. Black wind resistant and water resistant too. Fuzzy polyester inside smooth out side. I bought one on sale but the order got mixed up. The wrong item was picked and shipped multiple times to multiple customers so the packages were recalled mid shipment but I didn’t get the email. I’m tracking package and I see it went back. I contacted them, they informed me of the problem and sent right one out. It arrives and I love it. Then a second one arrives and rather than send it back I cut a deal with MW for a 50% off on the second one. Great for cool spring and fall and Nordic skiing. When you find something really special, get two.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Those sound a lot more technical than my basic Merino setup, but I completely agree with the sentiment. If it’s part of your uniform then having a second is always good.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major vantanclub IslandLife

for the NSR, they should offer 5 rack option on the width of the 6 rack...  4 and 6 are too close together imo

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
+1 vantanclub

Hahahaha. Great minds, or something… I asked why they don’t (have five seats, five bikes is perfect) and it definitely comes down to the asymmetry of 3+2 versus the uniformity of the current system.

That said. I don’t have any clearance issues except that the tine arrangement on the new racks doesn’t fit my rigid fork (#JerryWillowsHatesMyBike) as well as the older version. 

All the bike-on-bike damage I’ve seen (including an Ohlins air shock that got DAGGA’d on a gravel road) came down to pedal positioning which is easy to sort out if the person loading is even a tiny bit considerate.

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Tjaardbreeuwer
Tjaard Breeuwer
2 weeks ago
0

What keeps me from those racks is the inability to carry our gravel bikes. Or is there a way to fit non mtb forks in there?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
+1 vantanclub

They have a road bike adapter now, apparently it works great but it does really dangle the bike out there.

Reply

morgan-heater
Morgan Heater
1 week, 6 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

It is possible to flip a road bike backwards and put the handle-bars into the holder instead of a fork crown. I've carried bikes like that a bunch of times.

Reply

IslandLife
IslandLife
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

No way... spacing is perfect, keeps the rack compact and allows the following drivers to see my brake and signal lights well.  Use 4 bikes weekly and multiple long road trips... never had any contact.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 weeks ago
0

for me, it's more getting the bikes on and off.  Keep 4 the same but have a 5 rack option.  Not many vehicles can even carry 6 people.

Reply

morgan-heater
Morgan Heater
2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I've had a NS4 rack for six or 7 years that I got for $300 used. Still going strong, never had a bike eject on rough roads where other racks have let bikes cartwheel down hills (cough recon cough).

I did have to install a longer tube stock so that my overly long bike's rear wheel wouldn't hit the ground when going over bumps.

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Tjaardbreeuwer
Tjaard Breeuwer
2 weeks ago
+3 mrbrett Morgan Heater Andy Eunson

Haha, I read “long tube sock” at first!

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Andrew I see those socks or something like 'em in my future! The swelling is real.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Vik Banerjee

When I noticed the improvement in circulation with my good leg both riding and standing in the shop I realized they wouldn’t just be the temporary recovery piece that I was counting on. 

Huge difference for the swelling in my right too. It was insane before I bought these.

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Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Ahh, dissent socks. Love em'. I remember a few years ago at the shop, we realized the ideal XC Ski compression sock for most people was the Brandon Semenuk pro model - it's a bit shorter and not quite as compress-y as the downhill ski models (they have a dedicated XC model now). It always made me really happy selling them to grey haired XC skiiers who had never ridden a mountain bike in their life. I wonder what ol' Semenuk would have thought (aside from being happy about making money).

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Interesting. Why was the shorter length ideal in that situation?

I tried shorter ones as part of my journey to accepting the long-sock look. The knee lengths were way better at eliminating swelling in my bad leg but I felt they were better for circulation in my good leg as well.

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Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 Andrew Major mrbrett

It's been a couple years, but I think it was that some people who did classic found the longer ones rode weird when you did a full kick/glide motion. 

That or the Boss Man declared them the best for XC skiing (shop employee roster was full of clueless MTBers and Snowboarders). Really it's 50/50.

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Lynx
Lynx .
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Well, maybe one of those things would apply to me, ok maybe 2 if I include the socks, but not a chance in hell, at any time in the year would you catch anyone riding in full length pants down here - our coolest daytime high is like 25C and that's a rarity, so knee high socks and shorts=no way :LOL:

Since you mentioned the Skeletool, I think it gives me an in to ask ... I have an OG Leatherman CORE tool, one lock spring finally broke after prob 20 years of use and it's a heavy pig, so what new version would give me a pliers, saw, serrated and regular knife, regular philips & flat bit, can/bottle opener, awl that's also not heavy?

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Nope, I can’t. I despise tools that don’t feel nice in hand when I’m using them (including the vast majority of bicycle many-function tools).

The Skeletool is excellent as a knife or pliers/cutters and serviceable as a screwdriver (flip bits) and they very wisely stopped there without making it any wider. Oh, the clip doubles for bottle opening. 

So no saw, and no cork screw for wine bottles but it’s sweet to use.

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pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I don't think you'll find a multi-tool with ALL those accessories in any kind of quality that won't be a pig. That's a long list and things like pliers, blades, and saws can't be both light and durable/useful. I have a  Leatherman Free P2 that's a great tool, but it's still fairly heavy and it doesn't have a saw or a serrated  blade (but what it does have and how it works are pretty great).

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Lynx
Lynx .
2 weeks ago
0

Actually after reading this went and checked out the Skeletool Andrew mentioned, then went browsing and although initially had a case of too much choice delema, started looking carefully and came across  the SIGNAL, with pretty much all I want and it's about 100g lighter than the CORE, so that's in the books for the future, when funds allow - not cheap at double the price nearly. That P2 Free looks interesting as well, with the addition of the scissors and just a few grams heavier and around the same price.

Leatherman SIGNAL multi tool

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just6979
Justin White
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Do the WeAreOne models that come with AXS get a charger included in retail packages? If not, that's a huge oversight. If yes, why aren't they sending normal retail packages to testers?

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 Lynx . vantanclub

Yes, of course they do.

This was just me having some fun at their oversight. I’m certain every other reviewer they sent one to already has an AXS charger. 

It was supposed to be funny. Like maybe not HA-HA funny, but a little Hehehehe. You know?

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pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Lynx .

Every test bike scenario is a bit different. Sometimes an entire box shows up right from 'regular' inventory. Other times test bikes are shipped and sent from different places entirely - it depends on how the brand is set up, when the bike is sent (pre-production are often units sent from an office or the assembly factory rather than a warehouse), and in this case the bike was picked up straight from We Are One, so it was already built. I'm sure it also didn't come with an owner's manual and the various other pieces of paper and plastic that come in retail bike boxes.

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cooperquinn
Cooper Quinn
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+9 Lynx . Morgan Heater PowellRiviera Pete Roggeman Tjaard Breeuwer mrbrett sverdrup Cr4w Andy Eunson

Hell, review bikes aren't even always new. 

I've had multiple review bikes come w/o various bits and bobs (including AXS chargers) you'd expect to see in a retail bike purchase. 

I think Andrew just noted it as it's amusing because many reviewers likely have a charger laying around already. But he doesn't, because he doesn't believe gears are real.

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earleb
earle.b
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

We've had our NSR4 since 2009 and it's still going strong, picked up from when they ran the business from their garage in Lynn Valley. Seen many full winters left on the vehicle for hundreds of trips up and back the Sea to Sky to Whistler, considering this it is had minor rust. 

My only nit pick is that on our current vehicle we pair it with a Kuat swing away and I'd like to find a way to have the rear tire sit closer to the van rear hatch. Tuck in the center of gravity closer to the hatch. 

I dream of a day when I can have every single fastener on the bike a T25.

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Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
2 weeks ago
0

I love the wolftooth 6bit, but was really disappointed to get it in the mail and see that they keychain is sold separately. Wtf???

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks ago
0

They sell it both ways on their website. There are SKUs for both with and without the keychain.

Why don’t they only sell it with the keychain? I think it’s one of those cases where they can’t win for losing.

They sell a really nice German-made stainless steel will-last-forever version of the ‘same thing’ you can buy the cheapo version of for a couple bucks. This way folks have the choice between the most economical version and what WTC recommends.

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Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
2 weeks ago
0

I still love it as a cheaper version of the 8bit. I have already lost 2 8bits which is getting expensive, but I really appreciate how flat the tool is so I'm not as afraid of falling on it in my pocket.

I guess I wasn't sharp enough to notice that the 6bit comes without the keychain since they still advertised how the keychain keeps it closed nicely... my fave tool anyway :/

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