deniz merdano ryan walters formula wr1 bell
FIRST IMPRESSIONS

We Are One - Convergence Series Rims

Words Ryan Walters
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Nov 23, 2022
Reading time

We Are One rims have evolved to become some of the most sought after hoops for rough play. As a machinist who has worked his entire life in Canadian manufacturing, I’ve followed the progress of We Are One with great interest - a true tale of David vs. the Goliath of overseas manufacturing - except this David is armed with CNC machines and FEA software.

Not ones to rest on their laurels, We Are One continue to push their rim technology into new shapes and directions. Drawing on their experience from the tried and tested “Revolution” family of rims, We Are One are now set to release their next generation of heavy duty carbon hoops: The Convergence.

deniz merdano ryan walters formula wr1 bell 3

Not just eye candy. These alternating waves allow the nipples to contact the spoke bed at a perpendicular angle, resulting in a more durable wheel.

In what may prove to be a sign of the times (27.5 ain't dead!), We Are One are focusing on 29ers for the initial launch of the Convergence family, while 650b options are still in development. The new rim line is further broken down into three sub-variants whose main differences are their internal bead widths. The 495g “Sector” features a 28mm bead width that is ideally suited to trail bike tire widths of 2.2” to 2.4”. The 505g “Triad” sports a familiar 30mm bead that works best for the 2.4” to 2.6” tire widths you’ll find on most enduro, freeride and DH bikes. The 523g “Fuse” is the big kid in the family, with a 33mm bead that plays nicely with 2.5” to 2.8” tire widths. All three variants are available in 28 or 32 spoke options, and We Are One recommend going with 28 spoke front wheel builds and 32 spoke rears. For those of you who measure ride duration in watt-hours, the Triad and Fuse are both e-bike certified.

At first glance, the most obvious departure from the Revolution family is the wavy spoke bed found on all Convergence rims. More than just eye candy, this functional shape allows each spoke nipple to contact the rim bed at a perpendicular angle, eliminating point loading in the spoke bed, leading to improved spoke and nipple fatigue, while increasing durability of the rim itself. Look more closely, and you might notice the slimmer depth of the Convergence rim. At 19mm deep, these rims offer improved ride comfort and damping in the vertical plane, while increasing lateral stiffness through laminate orientation and material selection.

Not so obvious to the naked eye is the fact that Convergence rims have a measured 32% impact strength improvement over the Revolution line, achieved through the aforementioned new layup techniques and materials. As with the Revolution line, Convergence will be available as rims only or in pre-built wheel options. All rims manufactured by We Are One carry their no-nonsense lifetime warranty to the original owner - if you manage to break a rim while riding on it, We Are One will replace it.

deniz merdano ryan walters formula wr1 bell 6

Can you hear this picture?

In spite of the unfriendly weather we have in store for the next 4 months, I’ll be rallying hard on a pair of Triad wheels. Built on Industry Nine Hydra hubs, these wheels look ready to withstand some serious abuse - which is good, because they’ll certainly see their fair share while bolted to my bicycle. I already have a handful of rides on them, and so far my experience has been excellent. The one performance characteristic I can report back at this point is that these new rims feel noticeably more compliant along the vertical axis compared to We Are One’s Union rims, while lateral stiffness and steering precision feel about the same. No doubt I’ll have a lot more to say about these beautiful hoops in the coming months, so stay tuned for my long term review.

deniz merdano ryan walters formula wr1 bell 8

A slimmer radial cross section results in a more comfortable ride, while new materials and layup have significantly increased impact resistance - a good thing, as this particular rim is going to see some heavy action over the next few months.

We Are One Convergence Pricing

Convergence Wheelset / Industry Nine Hydra hubs: 1,999 CAD / 1,799 USD

Convergence - Rim Only: 605 CAD / 475 USD

More info here about the We Are One Convergence

rwalters
Ryan Walters

Age : 40

Height : 1803mm

Weight : 86kg

Ape Index : 1.03

Inseam : 787mm

Bar Width : 780mm

Preferred Reach : Pretty comfy at 487mm these days.

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Comments

Timmigrant
Tim Coleman
1 week, 6 days ago
+6 Ryan Walters Tyler Maine NealWood Cr4w ohio Mammal

Kudos to We Are One, these rims looks fantastic. Matching the spoke angle in the layup must have taken some clever design work, and makes a ton of sense.

Reply

Ride.DMC
Ride.DMC
1 week, 6 days ago
+6 DadStillRides Velocipedestrian taprider NealWood Mammal Endur-Bro

I'm interested to hear the long term review as this is an upgrade I would love to make.  

One of the writers on this site once suggested we use WR1 in place of WAO and I would support that change.

And this is a tangent unrelated to this article, but I'm also looking forward to the time when everyone just agrees we forgo using the words "acoustic" or "analogue" when referring to a non-electric bike or bicycle. Bike or bicycle will do - just as they have done for the past 80 or so years that we've had to distinguish between bikes and motorbikes.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 5 days ago
+6 Andy Eunson Tim Coleman Craig Ellis taprider NealWood Mammal

I’m totally with you on the analog / acoustic bike silliness. Can we just call them bikes??

Stay tuned for my long term review…

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 5 days ago
+7 Vik Banerjee Ryan Walters Andrew Major Cr4w kcy4130 ohio Endur-Bro

Broped?

Reply

IslandLife
IslandLife
1 week, 5 days ago
0

I've been seeing and hearing the term "muscle bikes" being thrown around lately... sigh....

Reply

taprider
taprider
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 myarmisonfire@live.com

when I am bikepacking, my bike often get comments, "is that an e-bike?"

my frequent reply is, "No!" "Hey, that's an insult"

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 5 days ago
+2 Ryan Walters a.funks

I would get an ebike over a gravel bike...

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 6 days ago
+2 Andy Eunson GB

loving the new rims from WAO.... but I don't think you can distinguish radial compliance from one wheel to another.  How much does the rim actually move?  Tire pressure/casings would be a way more indicative of compliance imo but would like to know as I can't any documentation on it.   #nipplefatigue - giggity

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 6 days ago
+1 Jerry Willows

From my experience riding on Unions and the new Triads, I have to admit that the Triad feels more comfortable - less jarring. While I'm not a rim designer, I would suspect that most of the "compliance" comes from the fact that the Triad is much slimmer in cross section than the Union, which allows it to flex more about the spoke nipple. If you imagine the spoke bed is fixed, the bead walls can still flex up and down a bit, relative to the spoke bed - similar to what the Zipp 3Zero Moto rims are doing.

It's subtle, but noticeable.

zipp

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 6 days ago
0

ok...  that's for uneven ground.  I know some people who had to sell their Zipp wheels because of too much compliance but I'm sure WAO doesn't suffer from too much.

Reply

Timmigrant
Tim Coleman
1 week, 6 days ago
+1 JVP

I tried the Zipp wheels at the launch in Whistler ages ago, and there was way too much compliance in the rim for me. In off camber sections the rim would roll, unloading the side knob you want biting into the dirt. Upside; this resulted in some humungous skids. 

I'd also like to know how much these rims deflect in normal use in the radial and lateral directions. Maybe it's because I'm a bit simple, but I've never really noticed comfort differences in rims, and always been surprised when folks talk about perceptible rim compliance through 30 mm of tire deflection and 170 mm of suspension deflection.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 6 days ago
0

Yeah, the Zipp is the extreme end of things. The WAO Triad feels awesome though.

And when I say "jarring", that's maybe too strong a word. The Unions aren't necessarily uncomfortable, but the Triad feels more forgiving to me.

Reply

T-mack
T-mack
1 week, 5 days ago
0

This comment has been removed.

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
1 week, 6 days ago
0

I've ridden different carbon rim profiles from the same manufacturer with the same tires/pressure and the difference in compliance is huge. The profile and layup used factor into my choice for a carbon rim as I hate the feeling of overly stiff rims.

I haven't tried the WAO product so not commenting on them in particular.

Reply

craw
Cr4w
1 week, 4 days ago
0

It's remarkably noticeable. I had a pair of Derby DH with a very deep profile from about 10 years ago. A few years back I switched to WR1 Converts and it's very noticeable. The WR1 are way more compliant in all the right ways.

Reply

andy-eunson
Andy Eunson
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 GB

That’s been my experience with ENVE M60 which were said to be super harsh. Reserves feel the same to me as do my WAO Union  wheels. But I only weigh 140 and a bit. I can run EXO 2.5 tires at 15-17 psi. I would think for heavier riders that might be different. 

These new rims look good. The design makes sense. But I am skeptical of strength claims. Got zero issues with my rims so I don’t need nothing stronger. Stronger than strong enough. Stiffer than it doesn’t flex now. I’m sure some riders need more strength than I do. I’m not that hard on stuff. 

I can’t tell the difference between so called compliant or stiff handlebars either. All the same to me. Again, I’m light, I have soft tires, lots of fork travel and 740 width bars. I like big soft grips so compliant bars seem silly to me. People claiming more compliant rims give them better traction I think have convinced themselves of this. Not many people that spend big bucks on something will claim it wasn’t worth it.

Reply

Brule
Tyler Maine
1 week, 5 days ago
+3 Andy Eunson Ryan Walters BadNudes

Hey Andy, good points on how you run your set and aren't looking for stronger. Riders of all sizes will benefit from the Convergence's resistance to impact strength. We'll look to have more content around it in the future but the main damage to all wheels (alloy too) is that one impact that whales through the tires and gets right into the rim - think square edged hits. They happen to everyone and this ZTR fiber along with our layup process will reduce these types of failures, thus less downtime and more ride time :)

Reply

Losifer
Carlos Matutes
1 week, 2 days ago
+1 Ryan Walters

I was hoping to hold out for the release of the Convergence line, but my old I9 Enduros were no longer up to the task of being pounded through the pointy rocks here in New Mexico.

I have no regrets with my Unions, and I look forward to building up a set of Convergence rims sometime down the road. Greater impact resistance and the angles spoke beds should make fr a great wheel set!

Reply

mammal
Mammal
1 week, 6 days ago
0

Looks like the Convergence Triad (30mm) is currently  available in 27.5 rim-only.

Damn, those are some SEXY rims.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 6 days ago
0

The Triad is the only Convergence rim available in both 29" and 27.5".

The other two are only available in 29".

Reply

4Runner1
4Runner1
1 week, 6 days ago
0 Ryan Walters Spacelizard

If / when I need to replace my Union / I9 wheels, I’ll be shopping these. 

Blows my mind that rims are still getting stronger and with improved feel. That said, I have never found the Union rims to be overly stiff. At 210 lbs kitted, they’re goldilocks.

Reply

Timmigrant
Tim Coleman
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 4Runner1

I'm in the same boat, would like a set of the new rims, but *knocks on wood* I've yet to have a We Are One rim fail on me, and love my Union wheelsets.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
1 week, 5 days ago
+4 Andy Eunson Ryan Walters Tim Coleman Charlie P-t

The Unions are excellent, and the Convergence takes all of the good things and makes them that much better. The Convergence has a very audible difference when riding the Revolution rims. It has been described as damping, less stiff, more forgiving but not in a bad way, etc.
The ride feel is superb, the lateral stiffness is increased, and the impact increase is done in-house in a controlled environment with tangible data. 69, and I am not making this up, rims, 26 iterations to the layup schedule, and nine months of a dedicated team working on this project to get it to where it is. 

Better was the only option with the Convergence lineup.

Reply

PKMzeta
PKMzeta
1 week, 5 days ago
0

Do you find better spoke service life with the new rims as well? Snapping spokes has been an issue with my Union/Strife wheels and they were built up by WAO with the alloy polyax nipple. They've all broken at the spoke thread where it goes into the nipple so I suspected they are under stress there.

Reply

Remoh
Jonathan Wray
1 week, 5 days ago
0

This comment has been removed.

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 5 days ago
0

This description mirrors my experience so far. I’ve even used the word “damped” in describing the ride. And steering and line control is top notch. 

Well done, WAO.

Reply

Spacelizard
Spacelizard
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 Ryan Walters

I pulled some spokes through on a union, amd no hassles was imeadatly offered my replacement.  I even got to get a strife over a union replacement. 

Great job all around at WA1

Reply

Blofeld
Blofeld
1 week, 5 days ago
0

I was convinced there was a typo when I read that the 28mm Sector was virtually the same weight as the 30mm Triad. After confirming the numbers on the WR1 site I ended up a little confused. The Sector is up 70g from the claimed weight of the old 27mm Faction, and to me, looks almost indistinguishable from the Triad. 

Would somebody sort out this similarity in SKUs? Was there just no point buying a Strife with a lifetime warranty on a Union? Were Factions being flogged in the bike park? Did nobody else convert to Converts? I thought the Revolution line was well spaced but perhaps I know nothing.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 5 days ago
0

The goal with Convergence wasn’t a lighter rim, but a more durable wheel build and improved ride characteristics.

Reply

Blofeld
Blofeld
1 week, 5 days ago
0

I’m not discounting WR1‘s internal testing report. I just see the Convergence line as 3 (almost identical) replacements for the Revolution Union. I’m curious if they’ll use this new construction for something lighter or wider at some point. Will they continue to make the Faction and Convert in the interim?

Reply

Brule
Tyler Maine
1 week, 5 days ago
0

Blofeld - Think of the Convergence line as helping you get optimal tire to rim width ride feels. A rider running 2.3 rear tires, but 2.5 fronts is often on a dual 30mm internal rim. If they went to the 28m internal rim, then they'd get a better contact patch and correct tire shape thanks to the rim. All while being as strong as the 30mm option. The Faction (on my personal trail bike) is great but maybe a step away from the 30mm rider's comfort zone. The Convert is great for the 2.6 and up crowd but a 33mm internal rim is more in line for the 2.5 (way more common) riders out there. I hope this helps.

Reply

mike-wallace
Mike Wallace
1 week, 5 days ago
+2 Andy Eunson Endur-Bro

I really don’t understand this logic and industry trend.  It seems like 80% marketing and 20% actual benefits for the rider.   The specialized gravity team often runs dt Swiss 471.   In fact Finn won St anne on 471’s.   471’s are 25mm internal.   Or am I totally missing something here.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 5 days ago
+5 Andrew Major Ryan Walters Mike Wallace MTB_THETOWN Endur-Bro

with a narrower rim, you'll get a rounder tire, easier to corner.  I've been going from Specialized 2.6 to 2.3 (4mm height and width difference) and the cornering is WAY better.  I read somewhere that Loic likes a narrow rim for the precision.  

People adjust to what they have and in the end probably doesn't make a big difference.  

WAO good people....  give back to the trail builder so that's where I spend my $'s.

MTB_THETOWN
MTB_THETOWN
1 week, 4 days ago
0

I think it depends on the rider. If you push hard on your tires and rims and jam the side knobs hard into the trail for grip, wide rims and fat tires feel really squirmy and weird. If you are someone who rides lighter and relies on tire tread etc. for traction, the wider rims and softer tires give extra grip. I think that's why we see EWS and DH riders in narrower rims and XC on wider ones.

Narrower rims are also going to be lighter and stronger, all things like layup being equal

just6979
Justin White
1 week, 5 days ago
0 Ryan Walters IslandLife

"are both e-bike certified"

By whom? And what does that even mean? Especially in light of a no-nonense lifetime guarantee...

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 5 days ago
+3 Tyler Maine IslandLife Charlie P-t

By WAO themselves. And you raise a valid point - I’m sure your e-bike won’t burst into flames (at least not due to the rims, haha!) if you run the Sectors, but it’s probably just a recommendation from WAO, steering you in the right direction for the right tools for the right job.

Reply

zigak
ZigaK
1 week, 5 days ago
0

Do these rims handle the additional stresses introduced by schwalbe procore?

Does the warranry cover damage caused by such use?

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 ZigaK

With all the "friendlier" options on the market now, I didn't think anyone was still using Procore! I'm sure you'd be ok - after all, the warranty has no disclaimers about inserts. The only stipulation is that you need to be the original owner, and you need to be riding the bike at the time of failure for a warranty consideration.

Reply

Brule
Tyler Maine
1 week, 5 days ago
0

The video above shows a rider riding without inserts. My question is why add something that changes the tension on the spokes like ProCore does? Like Ryan states, many options don't introduce that added stress, and even a few more PSI goes a long ways.

Reply

zigak
ZigaK
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 Ryan Walters

I use procore because it's the only insert (that I know of) that prevents burping (well).

Since converting to tubeless, I never had problems with snake bites, but did have problems with burping. Particularly on steep off-camber footpaths climbing up with as low tire pressure as possible.

The mechanism of the procore is it puts pressure on the bed/edge of the tire and on to the rim, effectively holding the tire "prestressed" or squeezed between the rim and the inner tire. All other systems just put a "passive obstruction" to the bed of the tire lifting off the rim (for a lack of a better expression).

Not trying to convince anyone about anything. Procore works for me, it has its drawbacks, one of them being it can damage rims, that is why I asked.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
1 week, 5 days ago
0

Cushcore helps as well for burping: https://cushcore.com/how-it-works/

I run Tannus (can't stand the install/removal of Cushcore) with trail casing tires and don't have problems with burping: 

https://www.pinkbike.com/u/Tannus/blog/tannus-introduces-lighter-faster-easier-tubeless-tire-insert.html

Reply

MTB_THETOWN
MTB_THETOWN
1 week, 4 days ago
0

I didn't hear many complaints about people breaking the old versions, so I'd like to see a rim with a focus on cutting some weight as opposed to adding more strength. They are supposedly making the BERD rims which save like 100 grams each, which shows that it should be possible. I've been looking at these rims for a while, but the weight is about the same as an equivalent Stan's rim so for $600 each it didn't seem worth it at the time. 

I am impressed they got the price down to $450 though. That's cheaper than most well made overseas options. These will probably be my next rims.

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T-mack
T-mack
1 week, 3 days ago
0

Berd cuts weight because of the spokes for the most part. 32 x 282mm Sapim spokes (29er) weighs 196g on my scale which equates to just under 400g per wheelset. Berd uses the 'cloth' spokes which weigh much less. What ever happened to Ti spokes?!

Reply

xy9ine
Perry Schebel
1 week, 3 days ago
+1 MTB_THETOWN

the berd's are around 2.5g per spoke; good bit of savings there. ti is around 4g (2.0mm straight); not a huge savings over a fancy steel spoke like a cx ray, but the ti dye colors has lured me on more that one occasion. can still buy them, but they're a bit finicky (and expensive). 

but yeah, given these rims are pretty similar in weight to a stans mk4 (which relatively light me can't kill), it'd be interesting to see how light one could build a "reasonably" durable (ie, no lifetime warranty) trailbike rim with current composite tech.

Reply

MTB_THETOWN
MTB_THETOWN
1 week, 3 days ago
0

The spokes cut weight too, but in the recent Pink bike article on Berd's new Enduro wheelset, they said the rims alone are about 393 grams which is over 100 grams lighter than these. I have heard that WR1 use lighter construction for the rims they build for other companies and this is an example of that.

Reply

xy9ine
Perry Schebel
1 week, 3 days ago
0

ok, those berds look pretty sweet; 1400g for the set, on a 30mm rim.

Reply

Endur-Bro
Endur-Bro
1 day, 16 hours ago
0

I'm still on my Agent 29s.  If those ever die maybe I'll go with these as a replacement.

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