deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 21 copy
First Impressions Review

We Are One Arrival 170 w 2023 Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil

Words Cam McRae
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Sep 16, 2022
Reading time

I didn’t plan this to be a review bike but I can’t shut up about it. I had been waiting for a shock to use on a We Are One Arrival 152 as a new platform for review parts and the 170 mm version of the Arrival seemed off in the murky and distant future. And then Dustin Adams dropped a bomb at Sea Otter and said, “we should get you the 170 links.” The excitement of hearing that, combined with too much cheap American beer, made me pee my pants a little. I enjoyed riding the shorter travel Arrival 152, and if I lived somewhere else it would be a great bike for me. But I don't live somewhere else and my goal all along was to get my tentacles around the bits for the We Are One Arrival 170.

As any mountain biker knows, the current supply chain is still missing several links and it was even worse in the early summer. What seemed like it would take days, took weeks and I missed the chance to test the new RockShox Super Deluxe Coil before it launched. And then it was attached to the We Are One Arrival 170 which WR1 asked me to keep (mostly) under wraps until yesterday.

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 7

New bike; looks a lot like the old bike. The component spec of the 152 and 170 is almost identical aside from the links, the rear shock and the fork. Oddly, this bike, which I pieced together, ended up coming out very close to the identical spec We Are One settled on for the 170 mm version of the Arrival. A few small things like post, saddle, grips, and cranks are different, the derailleur is GX AXS rather than XO1 - and the rims are WR1 Factions rather than Convergence - but otherwise it's pretty much bang on.

The first question everyone seems to want answered is: does the 170 ride differently than the 152 or is it just the same bike with more travel? The answer is a resounding yes. The 152, with seemingly high anti-squat values and a recommended sag of only 20% is not the most forgiving machine on the market considering its generous rear travel. It climbs incredibly well and, under the right pilot, it can go downhill at an alarming rate, but it's not best suited to the most challenging technical terrain or your average EWS course. The 170 on the other hand is designed to sag at 30% and has a much more plush, stable and forgiving ride. It's the sort of bike that encourages you to go over your head a little at speed and reach for that gap. Despite its forgiving nature it also handles the slow and janky just fine and is maneuverable in tight and complex terrain.

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 15

Lots of traction along with predictable and stable cornering performance with the combo of the Rockshox Zeb Ultimate and the Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil. Those buttercups provide a quiet ride while filtering out high frequency impacts without compromising your connection with the dirt.

My first few rides were slimy ones on MaxxTerra rubber but the bike managed to shine through the muck. The hesitancy I felt on certain moves on the 152 version was eradicated with two links and a longer stroke shock. This is a bike that is eager to get into the meat of its 18mm-longer travel.

I should correct that statement for the uninitiated. There isn't really a 170 version of the We Are One Arrival. There is one main triangle (per size) and one rear triangle. We Are One built a modular bike that can morph from the original 152 mm version into a 130 mm version with only a link swap, or to a 170 mm version by swapping both links and the rear shock.

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 28

Slabs are the Arrival 170's happy place and I've ridden some of the scariest, steepest and longest ever on the bike. This was not among them.

Following Trevor Hansen invariably leads to some of the toughest and steepest trails on the Shore, and the first lap, on the day I really started to get aquainted with the 170, was one of the two hardest trails I regularly ride. The Arrival 170 geometry was spot on and the bike was obviously an entirely different beast to its sibling. Despite these positive impressions, the bike went a little too deep into the meatiness on my first ride and I upped the spring rate from 400 to 450, just as I did with the EXT Storia I tested earlier. The increase in mid-stroke support was welcome but there was no loss in sensitivity. I may experiment with more compression and a higher hydraulic bottom out setting (more below) and the 400 lb shock just to confirm my spring rate but so far the 450 seems to be the ticket. But there still seemed to be something missing in higher speed rough sections, a challenging area for me to tune for, likely because that combination is rare here on the North Shore.

It took me several rides before I hit the sweet spot but on my fifth ride I found ludicrous mode with the Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil shock.* I guess you could say Mike Wallace helped me a little, by telling me exactly what to do.** I was feeling like the rear shock was stiffening on repeated impacts and pitching me forward. And yet it was so supple and smooth off the top that I was wondering if, after moving up from the 400-lb spring, which wasn't noticeably bottoming, I needed to go up from 450 to 500. In the end that wasn't necessary and the 450 was fine. As per Mike's advice, I sped up the rebound, much more in fact than I thought was prudent, and brought the bike to life in the rough and rapid sections I've been grappling with lately on multiple bikes. The bike went from feeling like it was getting hung up, to feeling like each impact launched the bike forward while filtering out unpleasant frequencies. Speeds I was struggling with earlier began to feel easy and I was able to charge into challenging (for me) sections with a bad attitude.

*ludicrous for me that is

**TBF he was just relaying info that his We Are One-sponsored, DH World Cup-experienced kid told him.

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 10

When I briefly had a tester of the Arrival 152, I rode a size large. It felt just a little short so I opted for the XL version this time around. The 475 mm reach of the large is a little shorter than my optimal 490 mm and the XL is a little long at 497. To compensate I left the fork's steerer quite long and used an unfashionable height of spacers. The fashion police haven't been kind but this is one of those occasions where function is just slightly more important. In the back of my mind I was also thinking a little about Bronson More and his Raised Reverse stem. I'm usually keen on slamming my stem so I'll make some changes on back to back rides and see how that goes.

An interesting aspect of riding this bike is that I've had no idea what the geometry is, aside from a guess at the reach based on the 152. I could have taken some measurements but I didn't. One thing that tipped me off was riding the most challenging slab trail I've encountered in Whistler this summer. There were multiple rock faces that were longer, steeper and scarier than any I had attempted previously and on the Arrival 170 I felt remarkably calm and confident. Considering the circumstances that is. It makes sense that the 170mm fork will have tipped the headtube back a significant amount considering it gains 20mm of travel and likely a little axle-to-crown length on top of that, but the Arrival 152's head angle is already a pleasingly slack 64º according to WR1.* My suspicion was that it was right around 63º but the front end doesn't flop or feel sluggish in corners, either up or down. I've just received the geo chart and according to We Are One the HTA is actually 63.7º, which likely means the links compensate for the length of the fork somewhat, which makes sense since they are longer. This number makes more sense considering my impressions.

*Isn't that better than WAO?

we are one arrival 170 geo 2023

Aside from the short-ish headtube, these numbers align with many of the most popular enduro-focussed bikes currently on the market, without any other numbers that are real outliers, aside from the head tube length which is the shortest I've seen in this category. This is likely to allow the frame to be used for bikes of three different travels. The Arrival 170 feels like an entirely different bike than the 152, which feels like some combo of voodoo engineering and witchcraft.

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 17

By the most important metric, the Arrival 170 has been a hit; the measure of amusement. Also known as fun.

TBH I haven't done many big climbs on the Arrival 170, but during the grunt up to the aforementioned slab adventure, the bike wasn't holding me back at all. I flipped the climb switch and the rear end became nice and firm for the mostly smooth double track lung buster, but I haven't found it troublesome wide open either. For me climb switches are only for road climbs, whether paved or gravel. This is partially due to the fact that I use some so rarely, I often leave them on for part of the descent, wondering what the hell is wrong. Still, on a bike with this much travel and significant heft (mine weighs about 36 lbs with inserts but it could easily be built lighter) the climb switch is welcome for someone like me who spends a lot of time out of the saddle.

2023-RockShox-Super-Deluxe-Coil-hydraulic-bottom-out-ef577c3

Without any leverage curves, and having not ridden the bike with an air shock, I don't have a great feel for the progressivity of the ARVL in 170 guise. I have however had some success using the Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate's hydraulic bottom out adjustment (HBO) switch. I played around by first adding one click (of five) and kept going all the way up to four, but the bike felt most composed for me at 2 clicks. Above that it didn't feel quite as plush and seemed a little less bottomless. The HBO operates in the last 20% of travel by adjusting the rate of gas flow through a small cylinder within the chassis of the shock. The best news for many riders is that this technology opens the door for coil shocks on frames that are too linear for shocks without some extra ramp near the end of the stroke. Ideally this will give you the suppleness of a coil with the bottomless feel of an air shock.

2023 we are one arrival component spec

A real strength of We Are One's component spec is the parts they make themselves. In my experience We Are One rims are as good as you can get, and my time on their Da Package Bar and Stem have left a similar impression. The rims ride firmly but without any harshness and they have been proven to be very durable. Likewise the bars have nice compliance and they have improved the ride of every bike I've mounted them on.

deniz merdano hansen cam clayton graham sarah 32

A good day in the green room with Deniz.

What is clear to me is that the designers, testers, and engineers hit the sweet spot with the shape of this bike. I find it hard to believe how closely related the 152 and 170 are considering how differently they ride. I've been dying to get some bike park time in because it feels like the perfect beast for lapping Whistler, Sun Peaks or Silver Star. Hopefully I'll sneak in a couple of Whistler days before the season is done.

After I spend more time on the mighty 170 I'll have more to say about the bike, and the 2023 RockShox Zeb Ultimate (which I have been wrestling with a little lately in terms of set up).

deniz merdano WR1 arrival 170 Cam 25

Back when it used to rain...

I always feel uncomfortable when I have nothing negative to say about a bike, but if there are any demons to be found here, they have yet to reveal themselves. For me the summer is when I ride the least and I look forward to digging deeper into this bike and learning more about it in the coming weeks so I can deliver some more detailed results.

We Are One Arrival 170 MSRP: SP 1: 11,899 CAD // SP2: 9,599 CAD

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 170lbs/77kg

Inseam - 34"/86cm

Ape Index - 0.986

Age - 56

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Boogieman

Bar Width - 760mm

Preferred Reach - 485-500mm (longer with 27.5 wheels than 29)

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Comments

cooperquinn
Cooper Quinn
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+10 DMVancouver Cydwhit Cam McRae roil Perry Schebel shakazulu12 Pete Roggeman Devin Zoller dhr999 Suns_PSD

I just got one tooooo! Toast, though. I'm not an Avocado person. 

Reply

xy9ine
Perry Schebel
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+3 Andrew Major Ryan Walters Suns_PSD

do they offer a (too obvious) mix & match avocado toast option?

Reply

cooperquinn
Cooper Quinn
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

Ha! Maybe they'll do a special edition.

Reply

earleb
earle.b
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0 roil Dogl0rd

Someone asked about the Avocado Toast option on their IG questions yesterday and they said no. Cue sad millennials not able to spend their house down payment savings on a Avocado Toast WAO.

Reply

mammal
Mammal
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+2 Pete Roggeman thaaad

Not sure why someone would ditch the sweet carbon fade. IMO, that's the best part about these paint jobs (cerakote).

Reply

rg-nw
rg-nw
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Yes, but it's only available for shipment to Portland, OR.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

Damn that looks good, Cooper! The splash of red is awesome.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

These new paint options are dreamy. Are the new colours still a Cerakote paint? To be honest, I'm not a huge fan of the sandpaper-y feel of the Cerakote.

Reply

the-prophet
the prophet
2 weeks, 4 days ago
+3 Jonathan Fournier Mammal BadNudes

As the "H" in HBO suggests, it controls oil flow, not gas.

Try cranking it all the way in as there is still a generous bleed fully closed and the fit between piston/cup is quite loose.

It is difficult to even feel the Super Deluxe HBO considering how large the rubber bottom out bumper is. You would wonder why they use such a huge bottom out bumper if there is an HBO unit? Perhaps it's because it doesn't work much past marketing lingo.... :)

In contrast HBO is very apparent on EXT shocks, and easy to feel with the teeny, tiny bottom out bumpers they use.

Reply

monsieurgage
Gage Wright
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Mark

I have been looking forward to this review for a long time and clearly I am excited about it as I read a bike article before 8am.  

Like you said, the 152 would be a great bike for anywhere else (almost).  When I hear a bike does not hold up to steep, chunky square edge hits I have to pass on it.  Sorry 152 Arrival but the category of the under biked bike is filled up by my hardtail.  

That 170 though...interesting.  The build spec still impresses me.  Even in places where Dustin could save money he invested in the bike.  Did you notice the Cane Creek 110 headset?  I doubt many people do but that is a headset you don't just pop out and throw away when it starts to creak.  Still, I think the old builds had Chris King headsets no?  I like CK stuff more and the company values of CK seem to align with that of WR1.  

Cam can you compare WR1 bars and stem to Oneup bars?  Gun to your bike, what would you choose?  

Excellent review but there is one photo missing.  Can we get a photo of the BB area?  Any damage?  I notice you did not run a bash guard on this build.  Was that intentional or are there no ISCG mounting tabs?  How did that exposed cable dangling ever closer to death by rock rolls and trail detritus hold up?  If you are looking for a demon look there.

See you on the trails.

G

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

I never run bashguards. I occasionally make some unpleasant contact with chainring but usually on my eMTB. No issue with the rear brake hose yet. I have already swapped brakes though and it wasn’t a big deal once a hose is already in there. The first time was tricky though as described here - https://nsmb.com/articles/running-a-brake-line-through-a-frame-without-internal-guides/

I have a photo which I will add when I get a minute  

I have spent a good deal of time on both Da bar and the One Up bars and I haven’t been able to feel a difference between the two. I am very sensitive to overly stiff bars - possibly because I run mine at 750 or 760 - and both of these feel great to me.

Reply

monsieurgage
Gage Wright
2 weeks, 4 days ago
+5 Alexander Filler Velocipedestrian Blofeld dhr999 Mammal

It's not the cable routing that worries me.  It's the exposure to damage.  Let me paint you a picture...

Imagine, it's April in Pemberton.  You have risen from a long winter on the Shore.  The dank smell of moss and rain is still deep within your nostrils.  Instinctually though, you perform one of the two annual migrations to Pemberton for the seasonal riding.  After a long journey past ski tourers and spring corn seekers you and your selected heard of mountain bikers arrive at the promised land.  Snow lines are higher this year, making the group even more restless as they chortle with amiable fondness.  It's time to ride and the group descends Mackenzie Cruise and Cop Killer.

Forgetful are those who are not local, for baby heads are plenty.  They fiendishly hide in the dust or brazenly declare their oaths of contention to those who travel their lanes of descent.  They are the serpents fangs to your precious stallion of carbon and sculpted metal.  The ruts leave little choice between the sharp rock and exposed hillside.  You are to ride into the maw of this voracious animal.  

A crescendo of sickening pings rings eery death to your hopes that today would be type one fun.  No injuries, no harm to your bikes.  Lay low your hopes and dreams naive soul.  Today the mountain dines on you.

Point being.  It would suck to have cables cut or crushed.  It would suck more if these were just replaced and you spent an hour feeding said cables through hard to reach places but reassured yourself that, "hey once this is done it's another year before we do it again".

I guess I am hoping there is an explanation for this design that either you or Dustin can speak to directly.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+7 Cooper Quinn ohio Gage Wright Mammal Pete Roggeman Sean Kollee NealWood

The packaging of the cables for a floating rear end is challenging. The entry point was very tight, and we had decided that the chain line was more important because having a cassette last longer than a few months was ideal. 
I had come from Scott bikes and a Pivot where this routing was the norm and never had an issue. We ran the bike through a year of prototype testing this way and never had an issue. So it was determined to be a safe method for routing. With 500 bikes out in the wild and still no reports of this being a problem, we feel it works as planned. 
It was not something that we didn't consider a concession, that is for sure. But the tight packaging and how the rear end moves left very few options for clean execution. The rear grows away from the front, so there is some slack in the line needed.

I have had almost three years on my bike, and still not an issue with the exposed cables. If it were of grave concern, one could run braided Goodridge lines. Not sure if they are still making them, though.

Reply

monsieurgage
Gage Wright
1 week, 6 days ago
0

Hi, very grateful for the reply and the time you took to make it.

Cassettes lasting longer than "a few months"?  I ride 3-6 days a week on Deore steel, they last longer.  Is this a 157 super boost thing or a higher end cassette thing?  Maybe I need to up my millage but the 8 months of rainy grit on the shore tends to test products pretty good.

Scott Ransom and the Pivot Firebird no longer route under the BB.  My friend's 2017 Transition Patrol has cable under the BB but my 2020 Patrol of the same make made the improvement.  The cable do run tight to the front chain ring and limit the max size of chain ring you can have.  

It is reassuring that there have been no problems and clearly you guys know what you are doing.  But...would it be too ugly to route through the top tube, exit before the seat mast and run along or through the upper chainstays?  

Good work Dustin and Co!

From the guy currently saving his money to get one of these.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
1 week, 5 days ago
+1 Gage Wright

Gage, the rear spacing is 157, yes. This was selected for optimal wheel bracing angle and the stance of the rider. The bike is more planted with 157, in our opinion.
We chose to use a 73mm BB that is typically used for Boost-spaced rear ends. What that has done is tucked the chainring in and brought the cassette out, making optimal chain line in the gears most mountain bikers spend their time in. 
So cassette wear is far better due to far less cross-over. There are other benefits as well, but they are based on efficiency claims, and I don't want to open that can of worms.

For bike one, we are more than happy with the outcome but know routing will be a big focus moving forward. The designed shape of the rear end would cause a mountain of cable slack anywhere other than where it is now. We did look long and hard at other areas, and this was the best option for this design.

syncro
Mark
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

+1 for the under biked bike being filled by a HT comment

Reply

roil
roil
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Cam McRae

Great writeup on an awesome bike. I am all in favor of WR1.

Reply

OneSlowBusa
OneSlowBusa
2 weeks, 4 days ago
+1 Dogl0rd

Just ordered a 170 SP2. Thinking I should switch to an XL from L order - 6ft .5in and ape index of 1.014. Thoughts after your experience with both sizes?

Reply

Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

Yeah would be interesting to know how the L feels with moderate reach and long CS. I imagine the XL would ride like a different bike

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

nice bike with a descent value for the SP2... wish the headtube was longer and I'm between sizes.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman Ryan Walters

Get the 170 and slap the Zeb up to 180. I raced this at the Dunbar Series this year the stack with a 27.5mm bar was more than fine. If you're a chopper guy, get the 35mm bar, and you'll be sweet.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Jerry Willows

Edit: Laaarrrrge.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

I changed my post as I looked at WAO's response from yesterday.

Reply

Ripbro
Ripbro
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

This bike continues to impress.  That one frame can be so versatile, look so good and be made locally is amazing. 

How easy is it to change out the links? Are we talking a 15 minute job, or grab a beer this will be a project? The trails around my area have loops best suited for a fast trail bike (130 mode) but also have area that are super steep (170 mode). Wondering if it is feasible to switch back and forth (130/170), or if it is better to choose what you ride most of the time and live with that, or split the difference and go 150.

Also interested to hear your impressions of the Storia versus the Super Deluxe. Wondering if the EXT is worth the premium now that RockShox has HBO.

Looking forward to future updates. This bike really piques my interest

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+2 Ripbro Ryan Walters

the new RS stuff doesn't need a special tune with the new adjustments, doesn't need a special shop for maintenance and way cheaper.   I've had an EXT and sticking with my RS.

Reply

Ripbro
Ripbro
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

Good to hear. The RS is significantly cheaper, especially if you could get a take off.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Mammal

Wait, does it take you longer than 15 mins to drink a beer?

I'm sure Cam will be happy to dig into what a link change entails, however I can tell you that swapping from 130 to 170 on short notice isn't going to be advisable unless you have a second shock and fork on hand. Whatever fork you run in 170 mode isn't going to work in 130 mode and vice versa. I can foresee investing in links, shock and fork (but then also you may want different wheels) if you're someone who lives in an area that favours one config but regularly travels to a place that favours the other - maybe you live in Bend but go to Whistler once a year, for example.

Reply

Ripbro
Ripbro
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Pete Roggeman

Not sure how I forgot you would need to run a longer fork… doh

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

It's normal to get really excited on bike release day ;)

Reply

goose8
goose8
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

This is a good point, but I have two ideas that could possibly work. 

The first is a manitou fork like the mezzer. My mastodon can be adjusted downward in travel just by controlling how compressed the fork is when one removes the shock pump. Pretty sure the mezzer is the same- I think Andrew Major mentioned that at one point on this site. So you could take it from 170 down to 150 in about two minutes. 

The second possibility would be using a DVO shock. I had one that could be downstroked by clipping on travel adjust spacers. I used it to take my process 153 down to 135ish in just a few minutes. Not sure if DVO makes a shock that would work with the WR1 frame, but figured I’d mention it.

Reply

mammal
Mammal
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

The Mezzer, like DVO forks, need to have a travel spacer removed/added to change travel, so that would mean opening up the air spring when you want to swap bike modes.

The thing with rear shocks that use travel spacers, is they retain the same eye-to-eye measurement at full extension, it's just the stroke length that changes. The Arrival 152 is designed around a shock that has a shorter eye-to-eye AND shorter stroke, so you would need a second shock to accomplish that change.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Ripbro

I pulled links only off the bare frame and then installed the new links and the shock. It was an easy job - about ten minutes but as Pete said you’ll likely want to swap the fork as well. I guess you could run a 170 fork full time and swap in the 152 links and shock to improve pedalling but that might mess with the geo too much. We need one of those old adjustable travel forks like the old Rockshox U-turn. 

A back to back comparison on the EXT and SDUC is tricky because they are on different bikes. Kinematics matter and filtering out the difference between the way the split infinity system works and the dual link system WR1 uses and isolating the function of shocks is above my pay grade. A bit like driving a Porsche and then a Ferrari and explaining which tires you prefer it seems to me. Isolating factors for bike testing is hard and removing variables is an essential part of that process for me. I’ll see if there’s the possibility to try an EXT on the Arrival 170 though. It’s a worthwhile endeavour to be sure.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 weeks, 4 days ago
+4 RNAYEL Mark Ryan Walters ohio

"A bit like driving a Porsche and then a Ferrari and explaining which tires you prefer it seems to me."

Happy to die trying, though.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

Me too. ;)

Reply

hotlapz
hotlapz
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

What the hell WAO I want the buttercups.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
2 weeks, 5 days ago
+1 Pete Roggeman

We did too. The nice thing about the Zeb is you can upgrade the air spring with the new tech. Not ideal, but possible.

Reply

cooperquinn
Cooper Quinn
2 weeks, 5 days ago
0

Welcome to the COVID era supply chain.

Reply

dano91
dano91
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

Very interested to hear more about this new coil shock. How does it compare to the ext? 

I’ve been struggling to find an ideal set up on the DHX2 as my frame isn’t as progressive as I would like.

Reply

syncro
Mark
2 weeks, 4 days ago
0

Great write-up and pics as per usual. I actually laughed at loud at the comment of a DH/FR oriented bike being hefty at 36lbs. Back in the day getting a longer travel rig down to that range was almost mythical. 

Cam, any chance you're willing to do a back to back to back climbing review on the full No Quarter route with say a full executioner descent on the 152, your current e-ride (Sight or ?) and the 170 so we can get a full digestion of whether this could be the penultimate S2S one bike quiver for human powered pedalers?

Reply

HungryMelmacian
HungryMelmacian
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

I'm just gonna say that after seeing the second picture, I just cannot get through the article without thinking - is that only me or the front tire is fitted backwards?

Reply

rg-nw
rg-nw
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

This comment has been removed.

eMcK
eMcK
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

One thing that stood out to me:

Available travel at recommended sag:

152 = 121.6

170 = 119

An interesting data point, even if I am unsure what to do with it, especially without the context of leverage ratio and shock progressivity.

Reply

We_Are_One_Composites
We_Are_One_Composites
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

The recommended sag you have posted up there is just a hair off.

152mm is 25% sitting at 114mm remaining travel

170mm is 30% sitting at 119mm remaining travel

The sag setup on the 152 has been tough for the press to follow as it is not normal. It has been said 20-22 and then some. But our stance and design have always been around 25% sag for optimal ride characteristics and preserved geo.

We have put the bike as close as possible at sag between the two models to keep the ride at home and in a comfortable and consistent setting.

Reply

Bmxkin45
Anthony Klick
2 weeks ago
0

I want the 152 with RockShox Super Deluxe Coil. I have an unhealthy obsession with liking coil far more than air.

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