AJ's GeoMetron G16 with 29-inch wheels
Same Same But Different

Twelve Months Later: AJ's GeoMetron G16

Words AJ Barlas
Photos AJ Barlas
Date Jan 25, 2019

It’s been a long time since I held onto a bike beyond twelve months, perhaps because of the rate of change and cost. In fact my eyes often wander well before a year is done. At first the “insert fancy new bike here” is the best thing since sliced bread but it’s typically not long before that feeling subsides.

About twelve months ago I shared my personal bike, a GeoMetron G16, and more than a year later it remains my do-everything weapon of choice. Built for function over fashion, most of the budget was spent on frame and suspension. From there the bike mostly came together from parts laying around. A pair of Frankenbrake Avid/SRAM Codes from 2009/2011, an old Easton ARC/DT 240 wheelset with Wolftooth Boostinator adapters, Race Face Turbine dropper, etc. The bike was built with a mix of parts that work for me that I already owned.

GeoMetron G16 29er Tool Storage

My makeshift and currently preferred method of carrying a spare tube and tools/pump doesn't look pretty, but it's functional and I don't have to succumb to wearing a pack. 

GeoMetron G16 29er Bottle Cage Mount

Besides, I already have this shit-show strapped in the front triangle. I never wanted a bike without a bottle cage before the G16 and thankfully the size Longest frame fits a bottle. 

More surprising than still owning the bike is that my eyes aren’t wandering.* It’s not carbon, in fact, there's very little carbon on it currently. It looks strange and it has things strapped to it, making it even more unsightly. But I don’t care. It’s a pleasure to ride and it has almost everything I need. I can ride shuttles or pedal all day comfortably, returning home tired but without the back pain I experienced for years on more conventional mtb shapes.

*That was until Nicolai and GeoMetron released the G1

That said, it’s a different bike now. The biggest change is the switch to 29-inch wheels and adjustments to affect hand position. Because of questions from readers and Joe Public on the trails, I've decided to discuss my current build. 

GeoMetron G16 with 29-inch wheels

"Do these wheels make me look well proportioned?"

The Wheel Change

The low BB of the G16 makes it versatile. Running the bike with 29-inch wheels is common and on the other side of the pond, many G16 owners ride hybrid 29-inch front/27.5 rear setups. After years of switching between wheel sizes on different bikes, this was the first time I was able to swap on the same frame. Aside from the increase in BB height, the shape remained the same, making this an opportunity to evaluate how wheel size affects performance with few other variables. 

On the trail the first thing I noticed with big wheels was the extra force needed to preserve momentum at slow speeds. A side effect of this was even more obvious; in crux situations when applying more power, I often spun the rear wheel. This was on the trails I ride almost daily on a setup that was otherwise identical. Once I learned to finesse power output in these situations* everything was back to normal.  

*Note that this is with flat pedals and while I don’t completely agree that flats contain the disadvantages many argue, I believe these situations highlighted a weakness to my pedal technique that had to be fixed.

GeoMetron G16 27.5

Before. The G16 with the original build and smaller 27.5-inch wheels. 

AJ's GeoMetron G16 with 29-inch wheels

After. Side-by-side the 29er looks bigger but more proportional. Big fenders mean it's winter time. 

Going down, I also noticed the differences often touted, but they were glaringly clear. Riding the same bike with larger wheels shone a light on the speed and momentum 29-inch wheels can deliver. On the very choppy, high-frequency terrain of my Squamish home trails, there was a noticeable increase in momentum. The bike didn’t get held up by the same features and there was less feedback.* A downside was slowing for corners. On trails I ride often, my braking was completely off. Entering corners too hot is always a surprise but thankfully the second attribute helped smooth out the problem. More on that in a second.

*A caveat is I now had the 2019 Fox 36 fork and it contributed to the reduction in feedback from the trail to the rider.

GeoMetron G16 with 2019 Fox 36 GRIP2

A 2019 Fox 36 GRIP2 replaced the 27.5 Fox 36 RC2. They look the same but ride quite differently.

I have a theory regarding feedback and my issue with braking and speed that stems back 18 years. A close friend in Australia hated riding in full face helmets. Spending the majority of our time in half shell lids, he found putting on a full face (usually at a race where it was required) made it hard to gauge how quickly he was going. For him the air moving past his ears and face was critical to judging speed and removing that feedback forced him to recalibrate.

Moving to 29-inch wheels on the same bike was a similar experience for me. The bike felt identical in terms of cockpit and shape, but it now moved along with less feedback at a given speed. Speed had to increase for feedback to be equal. Rather than reacting consciously I was interpreting the sensations the bike transmitted. This resulted in struggling to slow down as expected in the same distance. Were it on trails that I didn’t know well, the outcome would surely have been different.

GeoMetron G16 with Renthal Apex 40mm Stem

After some testing the bar and stem were swapped from the original 31mm Renthal and 25mm rise Deity for the same of each in 40mm reach and 38mm rise. This cockpit was and is still used because I find it very comfortable.

The second attribute, one that got me out of trouble in those surprisingly quick corner entries, was the tracking of the larger wheels. They want to rail and they comfortably hold ample traction. It's like cheating. A downside is they aren’t as easy to break loose and square up a corner as a 27.5-inch wheel. Now more than ever, the ‘smaller wheels are more fun’ comment rings true. Those same characteristic can be had on a 29-inch wheel; bikes like the new Ibis Ripmo or Giant Trance are obvious examples, but on the same bike there will be a calmer demeanour with a larger wheel.

These attributes were obvious initially and the intoxicating added composure and stability explain why the big wheels remain. And the G16 was already the most comfortable and calm riding bike I've swung a leg over. I’m still able to play with the bike but it's more controlled than when it had 27.5-inch wheels. I’ve also found that pedal clearance with the 29-inch wheels is much better, preventing issues with certain trail features caused by the low BB combined with the 27.5-inch wheels. 

GeoMetron G16 29er Fox Float X2

I opted for the shorter 216 x 63 mm shock, delivering 155mm of rear wheel travel. The shorter shock also allows for experimentation with the ET Key. It's a flip chip used to allow the longer stroke shock option without changing the geometry. With the same shock it changes the BB height by 4mm. I'm also still running the 2018 Float X2 because I've found it to work better with the G16. The new shock had a harsh end stroke with the same exact settings and changes didn't remove it completely. 

I had planned on throwing the 27.5-inch wheel back in the rear to check it out but haven’t yet. because there are a couple of attributes with the current setup that I find maxed out. Throwing a smaller wheel in will only exaggerate these. One thing I would like to change on the current bike is the BB height; it’s a fraction high with the 29-inch wheels. I run the bike in the 155mm travel mode (216x63 shock) and I can lower it by flipping a chip in the seat stay/rocker mount pivot to the longer, 222mm stroke position. Nicolai calls it the ET Key and it lowers the BB 4mm and I’ve found the height is excellent here. But…

When flipping the ET Key, the head angle gets slacker and I found it too slack. Stock, the static head angle is already 62.5 degrees, which I find excellent. With the slacker angle, I found weight over the front wheel too light and it began to push in corners. On steep trails I had no issues, surprise surprise, but as my all-around trail bike, it was too much. The bike needs to perform well on a wide variety of trails and the stock angle does this very well.

Another thing I want is a steeper seat tube angle. At 77-degrees the G16 is among the steepest currently available, but there are steeper and a seat angle of 78 or 79 degrees would great. Maybe steeper? Coincidentally this is where Nicolai and Chris Porter settled with the new G1.* Slinging a smaller rear wheel in the bike is going to negatively affect both the head angle and seat tube angle for me. That’s not to say I won’t try it and when I have a chance and some consistent conditions (certainly not happening at the moment) I’ll give it a go.

*Pole bikes are around the 78–79-degree mark and I found it quite good combined with the long rear centre.

Renthal Apex 40mm Stem and Deity Blacklabel 38mm Handlebar

Running a higher rise bar allowed for small adjustments to the reach by lowering the stem down the slack steerer tube. 

Hand Position

I built the G16 with a 31mm Renthal Apex stem and a 25mm rise Deity Blacklabel handlebar. Originally I had planned on lowering the stack to get some extra reach, using a taller rise bar to bring the height back up. But I still wanted to see how it was with a shorter stem and average bar rise. Seated, the smaller combination was too short and didn’t allow me to position well for mild climbs. Lowering the shorter stem and swapping to a taller bar improved things but it wasn’t enough. Tossing the 40mm stem on with the taller bar hit the sweet spot and has been remarkably comfortable. As it sits currently the BB centre to bar centre at the end measures ~913mm. It feels great and has allowed me to climb and descend comfortably.

*I’ve been using 800mm wide bars for a couple of years now. 

Other Changes

Although there have been plenty of test parts over the course of the year, the bike remains very similar to the original build. The SRAM Eagle drivetrain has been really durable and I’m running the same cassette and derailleur as twelve months ago. There has been a cycle of chains on it to keep things running smooth and while I fear it’s coming close to the end, the cassette is still shifting well. Many others have had positive experiences with the new 1x12 system.

GeoMetron G16 29er SRAM Eagle Drivetrain

The same SRAM Eagle derailleur and cassette remain but the chain has been regularly rotated. One quirk to the G16 is the 83mm BB shell. I'd be happy with a set of SLX cranks but the Saints cover the needed BB width. The new G1 is back to a 73mm BB shell, I'm told to improve the chainline with 12-speed drivetrains… 

GeoMetron G16 29er Race Fave Turbine Dropper

The 175mm Race Face Turbine dropper has been great. The air spring is losing pressure quickly now and needs a service, but this has been on a couple of bikes now and in use for more than 18 months! Other than the service needed it runs perfectly and has seen nothing but use and abuse. 


The old SRAM Code Frankenbrakes continue to perform. I actually prefer the lever ergonomics to the new Code brakes and if I were to update to the new Codes, I would see if these old levers could be transferred. I originally used DMR Deathgrips but once they wore out and despite spending a large portion of the year testing others from Ergon and Giant, I landed back on ODI. Any time spent on a test bike with these was a reminder that I like them. My thumb issue seems fine and has been for the year; perhaps it just needed more time than predicted. My hands haven't been this happy since riding Ruffians years ago and my arms/hands seem to prefer a little lift at the end of the bar. If these were to change I would opt for Andrew’s direction and glue on some push-on grips. The Chromag Wax grips on my dirt jump bike always feel so darn good.

GeoMetron G16 29er Frankenbrakes

I'm a fan of the old Avid Code levers. They have one of the most comfortably shaped lever blades I've used. 

GeoMetron G16 29er Avid Code Front Brake

An 8-inch front rotor with the circa 2009 Avid Code caliper provides lots of predictable stopping power. 

GeoMetron G16 29er Avid Code Rear Brake

The 7-inch rear brake rotor provides plenty of power and control. I also found replacement pads for the brakes. 


Most of the time in the 29-inch wheel guise, the G16 has rolled on Santa Cruz Reserve 30 wheels. More recently I began riding these alloy Roval Traverse wheels and have been very pleased. They’ve been great in the soft, slower speed conditions we're subjected to during the late autumn and winter but need some rough stuff to complete testing. Look for a review in the spring. 

Another new item that was just reviewed is the OneUp Axle F. You may remember my article about stash-able multi-tools rendering QR levers redundant and I’ve been running the Fox Kabolt through-axle all year. It seems OneUp are on a similar page and, based on demand, they've made a through axle option for a number of forks.

GeoMetron G16 29er Roval Traverse Alloy Wheels

Currently, the bike is rolling on a test set of Roval Traverse Alloy wheels. The MSRP on these is 650 USD/800 CAD! 

GeoMetron G16 29er OneUp Axle

Keeping with the bolt-in through axle. The OneUp has been problem free, as was the Fox Kabolt. 


Another rather large change this year was ditching the chamois. After years battling chaffing and a distaste in having to wear them to begin with, I’ve been able to comfortably forego them altogether. Unsuccessful in doing so previously, it took finding the right seat. That seat is the Specialized Power saddle currently on the bike and I’ve been successfully riding sans gooch-pad for the better part of the year.

GeoMetron G16 29er Specialized Power Saddle

The slightly odd, short length Power saddle has proven to be very comfortable. I ride a 143mm size and others with the same measurement haven't worked out as well. 


While the parts slowly change, for now the bike will remain the same. The G1 is very appealing, especially because the mutator chips allow you to lower the BB without changing the head angle. But for now I'm really happy and for the moment, ignorance is bliss.



Comments

Timer
0
Timer  - Jan. 25, 2019, 1:48 a.m.

Ironically, in the before/after photos the outside diameter of the wheels looks very similar because the 27.5 tires are so much fatter.

Reply

mammal
+1 Timer
Mammal  - Jan. 25, 2019, 6:56 a.m.

The 29er pic is taken slightly farther away, if you compare axle-to-axle distance. I'd imagine that's why.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 25, 2019, 8:50 a.m.

This. I wasn’t able to set them up exactly the same. Tried, but no cigar.

Reply

Vikb
+2 mike Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - Jan. 25, 2019, 7:53 a.m.

I'm glad you are enjoying the G16. Once nice thing with being stoked about a niche ride is that there are not that many similar options to catch your eye! For the coast a higher BB and a slacker front end is a beautiful thing.

I gave up bike diapers a bit over 10yrs ago and  never looked back. Finding the right saddle was key and took a lot of luck and some experimentation, but it's been well worth it.

I made the move to a 29er on a niche brand last year and have been in love since. I was really concerned I'd miss certain things about the smaller wheels, but really the downsides have been quite limited and I don't see myself going back. On one hand I wish I had tried wagon wheels earlier and on the other I am glad I waited for the geo to mature.

Have fun on the G16 for another year or more. The longer you wait the bigger an upgrade you get for your money.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+3 mike Andrew Major Vik Banerjee
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 25, 2019, 8:53 a.m.

Good point Vic. Waiting will make it more worth it. Besides, it’s great now with the coil shock and an offset bushing. Hashtagalwayschanging 

10 years without a gooch-pad! I wish I had been on it as early as you. Nice!

Reply

amrskipro
+1 Andrew Major
AndrewR  - Jan. 26, 2019, 6:59 p.m.

Duncan Philpott swears by Merino boxers rather than knix as a lighter more comfortable option.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 mike AJ Barlas
Andrew Major  - Jan. 27, 2019, 9:33 a.m.

The problem with merino boxers is that friction between shorts and saddle just shreds them. I tried a few brands when I first stepped away from chamois and they were all equally disappointing when it came to longevity.

I’ve been using Saxx for a few years now and they’re awesome. I recommend them to anyone who will listen. Pro Elite and Kinetic versions are both differently good. 

A saddle that isn’t an ass hatchet is of course also a requirement. Even with a leathery taint some saddles only work with a diaper.

Reply

DemonMike
+1 AJ Barlas
mike  - Jan. 27, 2019, 7:13 p.m.

Marks Driwear bike shorts. and have not used a cham or the likes in decades . Saddle is key , but so is riding regularly and position. I did do the Sumas Enduro years back with a Atlas DH saddle LOL. Sucker for punishment.

Reply

MTBrent
+4 mike Andrew Major Mammal Vik Banerjee
MTBrent  - Jan. 25, 2019, 9:01 a.m.

Gooch-pad free is the way to be!  The Deity Speedtrap is the seat that did it for me.

Also, "...the mutator chips allow you to lower the BB without changing the head angle."  Impossible.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 25, 2019, 6:58 p.m.

There are two different sets on the G1 plus alternate seat and chainstay parts. A combination of them allows the bb drop to be increased but set the headangle back very close to the preferred amount. It’s pretty incredible.

However, I should clarify. The G1 stock has been configured to have a lower BB than the G16 but the same HTA. At 35mm drop, I don’t think it would need to be lower. 🙂

Reply

grimwood
0
grimwood  - Jan. 27, 2019, 7:11 a.m.

I think MTBrent is correct. The front triangle is a fixed unit. If you lower the bb, and keep the fork fixed, you would slacken the HA and STA. Unless you shortened the fork. Unless maybe you’re using some sort of angle set to correct for head angle. Unless I’ve missed something huge here...

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 27, 2019, 10:01 a.m.

Check the tech sheets on the Nicolai website. There are combinations using the mutators and alternate seat and chainstay parts that change the bb height and allow the HTA to be within 0.1 degree of what it is stock.

Reply

grimwood
0
grimwood  - Jan. 27, 2019, 10:18 a.m.

I’ll have to check out the tech sheet. I just can’t wrap my head around it right now if the front triangle is fixed. Unless they spec different front triangles. Or choose different fork lengths. I noticed that on the G16 specs that they had a 170 or 180 mm fork with 275 and a 160 fork with 29.

Edit: I forgot to add that I appreciate all the prompt, thoughtful replies. Thanks AJ!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 27, 2019, 1:19 p.m.

Just read them again (thinking about it was doing my head in because fundamentally, what you’re saying is right!) and the closest is within 0.2 degrees with a 4mm change to bb height (for the size I would be after). So yes, you fellas are ultimately right. Impossible to change one without the other altering. Wild the amount of flexibility though. Let your imaginations run wild with the tech sheets. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRkmiccQwv7w1-V3bAvyqusOo674t3Z_ETG9TVxvz7lcVN4XWAlPnFashUAIbbMID9bpk8htF2qALLW/pubhtml

grimwood
0
grimwood  - Jan. 25, 2019, 10:36 a.m.

Nice write up AJ. After reading a few of your articles on the Geometron, I was definitely geo-curious. I looked into getting a frame and I was almost ready to pull the trigger... but the cost of just the frame is a hard pill to swallow. Especially without demo-ing one and not knowing if you're going to like it. So I dipped my toes in the long slack pond with a Stumpy Evo 29 S3 (I'm 5'8") and the 475 mm reach is a pretty big departure from the 435-440 I've been riding lately. Well it's only been a couple of rides, but it's pretty damn fun. And it didn't take very long to get along with a bike so much longer than my old ones. Like you said AJ, the hardest part is going ultra slow, other than that, all good things.

For those out there that are curious about the longer bikes, try to demo a Stumpy Evo (I think Steed in North Van will have demos) or a Transition. They should be much easier to get a hold of and will give you an idea how things work before dropping >$4k CDN on a frame...

Reply

mammal
+1 AJ Barlas
Mammal  - Jan. 25, 2019, 2:41 p.m.

I read the first few sentances thinking, "get this guy a stumpy evo...", then finished your comment.  That's on my radar for sure, and I've never EVER been much of a Specialized fan. Kudos to them for pushing that into production.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 25, 2019, 7:03 p.m.

Nice. The Stumpy Evo is a great bike. Too small for me, but still onto it. Glad you’re stoked on the new ride!

Reply

grimwood
+1 AJ Barlas
grimwood  - Jan. 27, 2019, 7:13 a.m.

Yep. For a big guy like you, even the S3 is the 275 is a little bit run of the mill at 490 reach. But for us shorter guys, it’s a big difference.

Reply

mtbzlt
0
mtbzlt  - Jan. 25, 2019, 11:53 a.m.

I just thought I would share my latest modification to my Longest G16 29er. I purchased 47 mm chainstay Mutator chips from Geometron Bikes ($190 shipping included), thereby increasing my chainstay length to 459 mm. I then swapped out the standard 215 x 64 mm shock for a 222 x 70 mm shock, thereby increasing the travel to an estimated 175 mm. With the shock stay flip-chip in the 222 mm (low) position and a 170 mm travel, 37 mm offset Lyrik, this gives a wheel base of 1334 mm, a front center of 875 mm, a front center to rear center ratio of 1.91, a head tube angle of 60°, a bottom bracket height of 345 mm, and an effective seat tube angle (with my seat as far forward as possible on the rails) of 78°. I’m 6’1”. I have only ridden the bike on pavement, but it feels great. The longer travel is easily noticeable. We are currently under several feet of snow, so real world testing will have to wait, but I think the increased rear center will allow a more balanced position and will make it easier to weight the front wheel. The next modification will be to put a 223 mm rotor on the front and move the 203 mm to the back. I tried to add a picture, but no go.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 26, 2019, 8:24 a.m.

Sounds like a weapon mtbzit! The longer stays should help with the slacker head angle for sure, removing the problem I had. Definitely worth looking into and I would like to try some longer ones on it anyway. 🤔 

What brakes are you running that have a 223 rotor available?

Reply

mtbzlt
+1 AJ Barlas
mtbzlt  - Jan. 28, 2019, 12:23 p.m.

I'm running Hope Tech V4s. Hope has a 223 mm rotor, but won't sell it. Trickstuff, Galfer, and now TRP have 223 mm rotors, but I'm going with a Hope 225 mm rotor with a +43 adapter and 1 mm washers. We'll see how it lines up.

Reply

mtbzlt
0
mtbzlt  - Feb. 11, 2019, 2:54 p.m.

Just a bit of follow-up now that I have ridden my bike on dirt. The chainstays definitely improve the cornering, and the climbing as well. The brake rotor worked perfectly with the +43 adapter and 1 mm washers. Definitely a keeper!

Reply

IslandLife
0
IslandLife  - Jan. 25, 2019, 12:02 p.m.

Just noticed you run EXO casings... do you use inserts as well?  Or does EXO work for you?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 IslandLife
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 25, 2019, 7:02 p.m.

I prefer sturdier casings like DD or Super Gravity. This was all I could get in 2.5 size for these tires in the autumn, so I went with it. It’s alright for winter but they’ll be replaced with DD casing treads in the spring. Thankfully the DHF and a series of other tires are getting the 2.5xDD treatment now.

Reply

IslandLife
+1 AJ Barlas
IslandLife  - Jan. 28, 2019, 10:42 a.m.

Makes sense, yes, I was very surprised when I was getting my new 29'r (moving up from 27.5) and I started looking at tires, that Maxxis had yet to offer 29" versions of their DHF and DHRII in 2.5 WT and 2.4 WT in DD versions?!! (at least to the aftermarket crowd)  You had to choose between EXO or DH.  Almost like the demand took them by surprise a bit.

It was a big part of the reason I switched to Schwalbe Magic Mary (F) and Hans Dampf (R) as I could get them in their Super Gravity casing.

Looking at the Maxxis site now and they still don't offer those tires in DD, but I do see them in EXO+ now... which is interesting.  Looks like EXO+ is only 70 grams & 55 grams heavier than EXO.  Which I'm guessing would be about 100 grams lighter than DD?  As the DH tire is about 200+ grams heavier than the EXO+ tire.... and looks about that in the 27.5 tire options.

Would be an interesting test....

Reply

qduffy
0
qduffy  - Jan. 26, 2019, 9:48 a.m.

You know that phrase about faces and "only a mother could love"?

I can appreciate the geo, and I'd love to try something like this or one of the Poles, but aesthetically my eyes are just wierded out.

Reply

Holgerfromgermany
0
Holger Baer  - Jan. 27, 2019, 3:01 a.m.

not sure its because I´m Germany but I think it´s a nice looking bike :)

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 27, 2019, 10:15 a.m.

I agree. I used to feel that it looked strange, and I still joke about it now, but after a while it looks completely normal and everything else looks cramped and odd. 😕

Reply

Duzall
+2 AJ Barlas mike
Duzall  - Jan. 26, 2019, 11:49 a.m.

I'm 6'2" and run my G16 x longest as a mixy, I've had the bike 18 months and really like the way I can ride what I want without it trying to kill me. The one disturbing thing is that it always feels to be able to go faster than I think. (I'm 63 and think it may be my last big bike)!

Reply

DemonMike
0
mike  - Jan. 26, 2019, 7:42 p.m.

What size water bottle fits with that set-up ? And in your opinion do you think the size down ( longer) would fit a bottle ?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 mike
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 27, 2019, 10:22 a.m.

I believe it’s a 22oz bottle I use. I don’t think it’s possible to fit one on the size down but I’m not certain about it.

Reply

nouseforaname
0
Nouseforaname  - Jan. 28, 2019, 1:09 p.m.

I tried fitting an SKS anycage mount to my Longest and even with a 500ml bottle and a side load cage it was a no go. Cable tying the bottle cage to the DT is the only option as far as I can see. Don't see how there'd be room on a Longer. 

With the dropped TT on the new G1 i think it would be even worse! Though I read a comment in the MTBR thread>> https://forums.mtbr.com/nicolai/nicolai-mojo-geometron-build-riding-development-thread-1016388-10.html << Post 921 that made me feel like a bottle option is coming. Which would be nice for when I win the Lotto and can afford to replace my G16 with a G1.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 28, 2019, 7:43 p.m.

Exact same boat as you! Tried to make the SKS adapters work, to no avail. Also saw that comment. Hope we see it soon. Quite interested to see what they’ve done.

Reply

DemonMike
0
mike  - Jan. 31, 2019, 8:48 p.m.

Just seen a image of the Nicolai EBOXX E14. It looks like they have a bottle mount on the top of the top tube !? I hope this is not the G16,S solution.

https://en.nicolai-bicycles.com/wp-content/uploads//2018/02/G16-qlfline-EBOXX-E14-3000x2000_real-1400x933.jpg

Reply

DemonMike
0
mike  - Jan. 30, 2019, 9:53 a.m.

Fingers crossed they come up with a bottle solution.  Maybe they could do what Starling and Cotic have done. Mount under the top tube. But from the sounds they are going to do what C-dale did. I really dig what Fezzara did with double bottles .

Reply

natbrown
0
natbrown  - Jan. 26, 2019, 9:04 p.m.

Did you drop your front ring size when you put the bigger wheels on? Even if you you did, I imagine a slight change in the precise ratio to the dirt could affect climbing traction, especially when in a very familiar situation where 'muscle memory' has a significant contribution. Not suggesting it isn't inertia necessarily, I think that's a totally viable explanation. Just providing an alternative to ponder.

Also, did your suspension settings change? Impossible to say on the fork I guess, but the shock. In theory when riding at a given speed, suspension shaft speeds should be slower when increasing wheel size. Just wondering whether that was enough to warrant a click of compression damping to you. Do you know if the suspension manufacturers account for this in their tune of forks for different size wheels? I'm guessing no, and that I'm just a massive nerd.

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AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 27, 2019, 10:10 a.m.

Front ring remained the same, which for sure adds to the extra force required. 

Suspension settings are always being tinkered with. I often want to set it up and just leave it, but after a week or two I’ll start faffing with it again. FML. I removed spacers and closed up the HSC one click. Later this changed again. 🤪

Reply

tfriesenfts
+2 mike Nouseforaname
tfriesenfts  - Jan. 30, 2019, 2:08 p.m.

I was on the fence about buying a modern/forward geo long bike, but reading your original bike check, and then this one, was what finally pushed me towards drinking the Kool-aid. My new G16 will show up in a couple weeks, see you on the other side.

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AJ_Barlas
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AJ Barlas  - Jan. 31, 2019, 3:57 p.m.

Big move! Glad to help and looking forward to hearing more when you get it.

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captainsl0w
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captainsl0w  - Jan. 31, 2019, 1:45 a.m.

Is that a 170 fork or 160? I had 170 on my G16 29" and when csu started to creak i got a new 160 fork and bike was instantly better.

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AJ_Barlas
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AJ Barlas  - Jan. 31, 2019, 3:58 p.m.

160mm travel for me. 170 would definitely be a handful on this. Glad to hear you're enjoying it with the 160!

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