2016 Trek Shremedy 29er

Words Cam McRae
Photos Kaz Yamamura
Date Mar 15, 2016

Don’t get too excited. This bike isn’t currently offered by Trek. We got talking to Ross Rushin and Alex Applegate at Trek about testing a Remedy 29er built for the Shore. Shore + Remedy = Shremedy. This set up is more like what you’d see at an EWS round than any of the stock Remedys Trek specs. Fortunately the Remedy Carbon is available as a frame only, in 27.5 or 29, for US $3299, CAN $4099, £2,400, or €3,199, so you could build it yourself or modify a stock build to suit your needs (the closest complete bike, the 9.8, retails for US$5499).

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Looks like a Trek. A 150mm Fox 36 fork tips back the head angle some to make this Remedy 29 more suitable for steep and challenging terrain.

It’s true. I’m testing a 29er. If you’ve read my previous impressions of wagon-wheeled bikes you might think I’m Gandhi reviewing a Donald Trump steak. A difference (for me – not Gandhi) is that my previous 29er rides have been on unfamiliar terrain. This time, I’m getting accustomed to this big-boned beast right here on the North Shore, and I can notice things I might not pick up elsewhere. Strava isn’t my thing, but on trails I’ve ridden dozens of times it’s pretty clear if I’m rolling well.

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All carbon aside from the chainstays.

And that’s what’s been happening. It took me about fifty feet of trail to feel comfortable on this custom-built Remedy 29er and it’s been feeling good on everything; speedy berm trails, uncomfortably tight switches and steep treacherous lines. It’s too soon to call me a convert, and I’m still unconvinced about the fun factor and pop, but this is a fast and capable machine. And that’s always fun. I’ll make sweeping judgments about the ride characteristics once I’ve had plenty of saddle time in a month or so. Until then here’s a look at what makes this Frankenbike tick.

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Protected underneath from unwelcome impacts.

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Bontrager SE5 Team Issue tires. These have been great so far. We can’t tell you about the rims just yet.

SE5 Team Issue TLR tires serve up an aggressive tread and they are apparently nice and light. We haven't peeled them off to weigh them yet. MSRP = US $74.99/ Canada $92.99 / AUS $110.00 / £44.99 / €52.99." src="/media/original_images/TrekShremedy_NSMB_KazYamamura-16_8G4ZiYQ.jpgw1600" alt="TrekShremedy_NSMB_KazYamamura-16" data-recalc-dims="1" />

The SE5 Team Issue TLR tires serve up an aggressive tread and they are apparently nice and light. We haven’t peeled them off to weigh them yet. MSRP = US $74.99/ Canada $92.99 / AUS $110.00 / £44.99 / €52.99.

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Without looking down I wouldn’t have been able to tell you this was an X1 drivetrain rather than XX1. This is some quality trickle down 1 by 11 technology. These are X1 1400 hollow arm cranks.

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The Fox Float EVOL RE:aktiv was co-developed by Fox and Trek using Formula 1 technology provided by Penske Racing, See the video below for more.

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SRAM X1 is a little heavier than its higher-priced siblings but the performance is impressive. Trek’s well-established concentric ABP pivot is designed to resist braking forces. The Remedy is set up for Boost axles front and rear, so don’t plan on keeping your old wheels (or grab an adaptor – more on those soon – Ed).

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DT 240 hubs.

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Trek OCLV carbon in the main frame and seatstays. You won’t need to open that trap door unless you are running a front derailleur.

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Shore Remedy or Shred Remedy? Either way it’s a Shremedy.

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Smooth lines and lots of carbonium.

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Trek’s Full Floater, ABP suspension configuration.

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The Mino Link makes switching between a 67.5 and 68 degree head angle relatively painless. With the 150mm fork our Remedy is slightly slacker at 67 degrees.

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They left out the Sh in Shremedy.

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Behold the Mino Link. Just remove the fitting and swap the link 180 degrees to change the attitude of your bike.

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Short stem and nice wide bars were included, but Bontrager is sending us a new cockpit to use for the duration of the test. The saddle is a Bontrager Kovee Pro Carbon. Very comfy and very light. 

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SRAM Guide Brakes mate with an X1 shifter on the right and with a Reverb Dropper on the left to remove all but two bar clamps.

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As mentioned. The under bar left side mount is my preferred position for dropper actuation.

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Trek has taken a sensible approach to internal routing, leaving the rear brake line on the outside, along with a portion of the dropper line. It would be even cleaner if these ran along the underside of the downtube – but let’s not get too fussy.

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Another look at cables emerging from and disappearing into the carbon frame.

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A custom-moulded chainstay guard complete with a shark fin to prevent chain suck.

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I have awkwardly long legs but the fit of the large Remedy is perfect for me with 820mm wide bars (I may cut them down to 800) and a ~40mm stem.

A look into Penske’s contribution to the RE:Aktiv rear shock.

With a pair of XTR trail pedals, our Shremedy weighs a scant 28.8 lbs or 13.06 kg. For more info on stock Remedys or the frame only option  (in 29 or 27.5) click here.


Is this a two-niner you could love?

 

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Comments

dan
0
Dan  - April 17, 2016, 7:34 p.m.

Looks like a helluva build, Cam! You might have seen the new 2.55″ width SE5's. They seem like a good match for this whip.
I am really thrilled with my 9.8 29. I'm definitely faster everywhere on it. I'll stay tuned for your reports.

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dan
0
Dan  - April 17, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

Despite the heckling I get, I am running a new 9.8 with the 2X XT setup and I've yet to drop a chain. I'm no Luke Strobel but I ride many of the trails you see in his vids.

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dan
0
Dan  - April 17, 2016, 7:29 p.m.

Also the stock 9.8 is a full XT 2X gruppo, with a non-K fork and 750mm wide carbon Bonti bars.

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dan
0
Dan  - April 17, 2016, 7:27 p.m.

A friend of mine did the same and says he also ran an offset bushing on the lower mount as the X2's e2e differs from the proprietary length of stock unit.

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dan
0
Dan  - April 17, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

I do a couple of shuttle days a year and frown on under-the-downtube routing for this reason.

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0
DDean  - March 18, 2016, 10:15 a.m.

I bet that you end up a convert. I love my E29 on the Shore on any
terrain - it does fine on the big climbs, fun on the rough and rolling
descents and it does well on the gnar on Cypress. Im sure that the
SHRemedy will be similar. Why you want anything but a big AM 29er for
the shore I'll never figure out!

Reply

powderturns
0
Mike  - March 18, 2016, 3:44 a.m.

Buddy of mine custom machined an axle so he could run a float x2. He's stoked on it. I keep telling him he should offer it as an after market part.

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mj12
0
MJ12  - March 16, 2016, 11:02 p.m.

Is that THE stick!?

Reply

tehllama42
0
Tehllama42  - March 16, 2016, 9:50 p.m.

So, with a high dollar Fox36 RC2 fork, unobtainium wheels (for now, as they're under press embargo to even discuss), and up-speccing every part that has a contact patch… it's an awesome bike. Actually quite easy to believe, but there are probably better ways to achieve the same or similar configuration that cost less.
As much as I feel like I've ruined the geometry (specifically too much bottom bracket height and too steep a head tube angle) on my Rocky Mtn Instinct by tossing a 20mm longer travel Pike fork and longer (RT3-DBA) shock bringing rear travel to 145mm, even putting a 160mm air spring in the fork my bb is lower, and currently mine is still slacker at 150/145 travel; my whole setup runs less than the ProjectOne frame.

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CraigH
0
Craig Hunt  - March 16, 2016, 12:08 p.m.

Maybe I'm out of touch, but $4100Cdn for a frame only?!?!

Reply

jitenshakun
0
Jitensha Kun  - March 18, 2016, 2:42 p.m.

Trek doesn't really want to sell frames, but if you really want it they'll overcharge you for one.

Reply

Captain-Snappy
0
Merwinn  - March 16, 2016, 11:14 a.m.

You know someone's got heritage when they call it a "shark fin". I think the photo accurately capture the original time line.

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reini-wagner
0
Reini Wagner  - March 16, 2016, 11:02 a.m.

So, pray tell, what are the upgrades from the stock remedy to that shremedy, for the uninitiated? I'm guessing, fork and shock, maybe brakes too? Please excuse my ignorance. Thanks in advance!

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - March 16, 2016, 11:31 a.m.

Upgrades wouldn't be accurate Reini. More like differences. Longer travel fork, different tires and wheels (with rims that are currently under embargo). And the frame finish is only available if you buy it frame only.

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reini-wagner
0
Reini Wagner  - March 17, 2016, 9:48 a.m.

Cheers cam, I appreciate your fast response.
Btw (and sorry for OT): Have you added a steel hardtail to your stable yet?

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cam@nsmb.com
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Cam McRae  - March 17, 2016, 10 a.m.

I still have my Dekerf - but nothing new. I'm waiting patiently for the right bike to be built at the moment.

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e-bike-rider
0
E bike rider  - March 16, 2016, 8:25 a.m.

It's cool to see more bikes built for aggressive riding without chainguides. I have a feeling clutch derailleurs will completely replace guides on all but race bikes over the next few years.

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craw
0
Cr4w  - March 16, 2016, 10:46 a.m.

Are you seeing a lot of guy on 150mm bikes riding chainguides these days??

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andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - March 16, 2016, 7:32 a.m.

"Trek has taken a sensible approach to internal routing, leaving the rear
brake line on the outside, along with a portion of the dropper line."
Sensible words, I don't think anyone who actually works on their own bike, and I suspect most shop mechanics too, like internal rear brake routing.
"It
would be even cleaner if these ran along the underside of the downtube –
but let’s not get too fussy"
And now you have obviously hit your head on something hard whilst test riding, maybe you looked down at that GX drivetrain, not believing that it really wasn't XX1 at the wrong moment on the trail ;-). Possibly the silliest thing I have seen you write in the last five years. Bikes that have cables routed on the underside of the downtube where they get can hit by rocks and get damaged? This routing also tends to lean towards having cable loops under the bottom bracket that appear to attract sticks at a far higher rate than standard measures of probability would suggest.

Back to being positive, good article. Looks like a fun bike to ride challenging terrain on. I find myself even more tempted to dabble into the 29″ world (nooooooo!!!).

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
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Cam McRae  - March 16, 2016, 8:17 a.m.

Haha! Apparently I'm all over the shop. I haven't had issues with under downtube mounted cables and lines personally but obviously that sort of damage happens to some people. I'd like to see a removable rock guard that also protects cables and lines at vulnerable points and holds them in place. The junction between the lower end of the downtube and the rear of the bike, where exposure is high, remains a problem, but I haven't had issues with this on my personal bikes either. I have also at times used medical tubing to protect vulnerable locations which makes me think bikes could come stock with protective sheaths of some sort. Thanks for the shit sandwich! 😉

Reply

andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - March 16, 2016, 8:33 a.m.

As always it is a very gentle and friendly shit sandwich. Not had problems myself (mainly because it is one of my "Don't buy this frame" decision points) but seen many a morning/ afternoon spent in repairs rather than riding from riders/ guests at WBP who went with a certain "large" brand who routed their cables under down tube & BB.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 16, 2016, 9:09 a.m.

If only more people served up shit sandwiches like you do, though.
Cam and I have both run Enduros without problems, but I agree about not wanting cables down there - and I hate the look of a loop of cable under the BB. I like the idea of a DT guard that integrates cables. Someone did one, I'm just forgetting who right now…

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cam@nsmb.com
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Cam McRae  - March 16, 2016, 11:32 a.m.

I was trying to remember as well.

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andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - March 16, 2016, 12:19 p.m.

Devinci I think.

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andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - March 16, 2016, 12:21 p.m.

I think it is RockGuardz isn't it (for the down tube guard) and if they don't already they will custom one.
As far as the LARGE brand I was more meaning "Jolly Green……" (complete that phrase) & watching people not really feeling the GLORY of spending lap time doing repairs rather than riding.

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qduffy
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qduffy  - March 16, 2016, 1:05 p.m.

Ibis has one like you describe on the HD3. The rear brake line is rooted under the tube protector.

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david-mills
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David Mills  - March 17, 2016, 6:36 a.m.

…and the HD, HDR and Mojo 3.

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cam@nsmb.com
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Cam McRae  - March 17, 2016, 9:58 a.m.

Ibis! Yes. Thanks. I knew we'd get some help.

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D_C_
0
DMVancouver  - March 15, 2016, 10:53 p.m.

Those tires are excellent.

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Cheez1ts
0
Garrett Thibault  - March 15, 2016, 10:14 p.m.

I really enjoyed the aluminum Remedy 29r I rode on the shore. It's a great trail bike. I can't see you wanting to give the Shremedy back.

Reply

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