Tools Missing from your Pack

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Sep 7, 2016

Some people complain, others just bitch
It might take a second to tell which is which
But the devil is in the details
– Joel Plaskett, The Park Avenue Sobriety Test

The Issue?

I’m generally on top of my bike maintenance. I don’t own any parts that are known to explode and there are no key trailside tools missing from my pack. Sometimes sh*t happens.

I’ve carefully put together my personal bikes and traveling tool kit so that when something happens I’m riding home. I don’t have an issue with walking when my legs are toast but I hate legging it because of a broken bike. While I pack for my own needs, the truth is I’ve opened my tool roll for other riders more often than for myself. And yet occasionally I can’t fix my own bike.

The other day my direct mount chainring came loose. It was not possible to tighten it on the trail. I was not amused.

King For A Day

If I was the head of a massive bike company, like Giant, Trek, Specialized, or Cannondale, I would sit down with my prospective vendors and deliver a very simple ultimatum. Holding up a pair of Torx keys, one T-25 and one T-30, I would politely explain that going forward any component being bolted on to one of my bikes, that may require on trail adjustment, would use one of those two sizes.

Tools Missing?

My Park Tool MT-30 includes a T-25 and T-30 Torx key. I’ve lent this tool out a handful of times on the trail to folks with loose T-30 chainring bolts and no T-30 in their ride group. Shop-quality Park Tool CT-6 chain breaker. I’ve never needed a headset spacer on the trail before but I’ve given out a number over the years.

Stems, pedals, seat post bolts, and even lock-on grips. Brake levers, shifters, rotors, brake adapters, hub bearing pre-loaders, and definitely brake lever reach adjust screws. If it is a component that one of my customers may need to adjust on trail or field service, it’s one of those two sizes.

Then I’d order up some really nice stainless steel Torx keys and include them with every bike I sell. Hell, design a simple stealth mount for them and no one riding one of my bikes would ever be caught out with the nose of their saddle 1 degree too high or their handlebar crooked by 3mm.

Tools Missing?

I find ‘most’ tires go on and off by hand but, especially on cold wet nights, I’ve used these awesome Schwalbe levers enough times to warrant carrying them. Leatherman is always handy for cutting zip-tires or straightening brake rotors. In the middle there’s a spare chainring bolt. Yep, I’m that guy.

Don’t Panic

Don’t panic. There is not going to be a sudden rash of sloppy and inaccessible chainrings. My direct mount chainring came loose because the bolts weren’t Loctited during assembly. It’s a simple fix, and all the production cranks will come with Loctite on the bolts.

The cranks in question, by BlackSpire, use SRAM‘s excellent GXP direct mount chainring system which relies on three bolts for chainring retention and I was surprised when the ring came loose. I talked to three of the best and busiest mechanics I know and none of them have come across a loose direct mount ring from either of the two most common systems; SRAM or RaceFace,.

Tools Missing?

I’ve been on a ride where a guy’s brake caliper fell off. Fell off! Apparently he didn’t notice it rattling around until both the bolts were long missing. Been riding with a pair of M6 bolts ever since. The plastic valve removal tool is handy if you’re trying to re-inflate a tubeless tire with a hand pump. Tylenol and zip-ties self explanatory?

Tools Missing

Even if my massive Park MT-30 multi-tool included the 10mm Allen Key needed to remove the drive side crankarm, they are torqued on with 50NM (37.5 ft/lbs or 450 in/lbs) of force. Just for a laugh I put the MT-30 up against a RaceFace Cinch crankset, using a similar 30mm spindle but 8mm bolts, and I couldn’t get the crank to budge.

I’m not about to start packing around a long handled 8mm or 10mm Allen Key the same way I don’t carry a cassette lockring tool, chain whip, the little plastic Shimano crank pre-loading tool, a bleed kit, or extra headset bearings. I have to draw the line somewhere.

Tools Missing?

It works well enough when I need it and the SKS AirBoy XL is lightweight and fits nicely in my tool roll. More zip-ties. I check my air pressure regularly but I’ve started carrying my SKS SAM shock pump when riding test bikes due to some leaking shock issues I’ve experienced this year.

The Kitchen Sink

It’s a derivative of Murphy’s Law I’ve heard before: when you pack everything except the kitchen sink, the only thing you’ll need is the kitchen sink. Such is the perversity of trail side bike mechanics.

In my perfect world of T25 and T30 bolts there are issues, like the loose chainring I’ve highlighted, that would not be resolvable. I’m eyeing each bike I ride for any small adjustments or common repairs I will not be able to make with my current toolkit. For example, I am suddenly noticing the lack of a 2mm Allen Key on my multi-tool.

Tools Missing?

Here’s my full kit that I take on every ride from fore to aft: SKS SAM shock pump, SKS Airboy XL mini pump, zip-ties, 2x M6 bolts, Schwalbe tire levers, Leatherman tool, Zipp presta valve extender, Schwable presta valve tool, more zip-ties, Park CT series chain breaker, 5mm headset spacer, chainring bolt and nut, tick removal tool, Park MT-30 multi-tool, Tylenol Extra Strength, a ‘Dale Nagata First Aid Kit’ (AKA Van Gogh Double Espresso Vodka), and the waterproof Mission Workshop ACRE pack my awesome wife gifted me.

I’m eyeing my tool roll for the superfluous weight on my back with an eye to basic adjustments versus convenient, but non ride-ending, repairs that could wait for home.

Tools missing vs. tools I should miss?


Minimalist? Maximalist? Specific tool you never leave home without? Superfluous tool you recently edited out of your pack?

Comments

levon-jensen
0
levon jensen  - Dec. 30, 2016, 10:53 a.m.

Quikclot,

If there is one thing to have in a first aid kit it would be quick clot, everything else can be sorted out. Stop bleeding almost instantly, with the speed we are going at nowadays, and some of the big crashes, being able to stop aterial bleeding is a must have.

I have the crankbros 19 multitool, and a few spare parts. keep the bikes well tuned so i mostly help out others. has one of the better chaintools, still not great, carry a parktool chain tool at the bike park.

Reply

db79467
0
db79467  - Dec. 30, 2016, 10:02 a.m.

My most used (which actually means most borrowed) tool is my valve stem tool. Due to the amount of use (and that one time the rear shock valve was loose on a borrowed bike) I carry an aluminum one with both presta and schrader.

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scott-fieldhouse
0
Scott fieldhouse  - Sept. 18, 2016, 8:52 a.m.

The chain repair third hand. Take an old spoke or piece of metal coat hanger and cut to about six inches. Put a just over 90 degree bend / hook on each end about a half inch long. When working on chains on the bike use this tools hooks to hold the chain creating slack to fiddle with your chain tool and or stupid quick link. It's the best, especially in cold times. It weighs nothing and when people are blown away at how handy it is you can give it to them.

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doug-m
0
Doug M.  - Sept. 12, 2016, 9:41 a.m.

Another MTB use for Leatherman pliers: tighten a loose cassette lockring or centerlock rotor. Those things have saved my hide so many times I'm paranoid to leave the house without 'em.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 12, 2016, 7:35 p.m.

Bending rotors straight enough, pulling zip-ties tight and cutting them when making a tire rideable where the bead had separated from the casing, I even tensioned a (f'd anyway) wheel with them one time.

Totally don't leave home without them. My set was a gift so the value is awesome but I have considered buying a set of the super light ones.

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traildog
0
traildog  - Sept. 10, 2016, 4:25 p.m.

my direct mount chainring came loose monthly until I started soaking the lockring in loctite

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 10, 2016, 5:51 p.m.

Hi TD,

Do you mind saying what cranks you're running?

Blue loctite?

Reply

esteban
0
Esteban  - Sept. 8, 2016, 5:48 p.m.

Topeak Mini 9
Victorinox Trailmaster (only mine has wavy blade, not straight)

Patches, sandpaper, valve converter, glue kit and mini pump.

That's served me perfectly well so far: I don't do mountain so much, but I routinely go on 100km-ish pavement-dirt trail trips.

And I haven't found "my" flask… All of them are hideous with logos or stupid kcco crap.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 6:54 p.m.

Let me know what you go with when you find 'the one'. Logos or no logos I have a couple that are all the same (meh).

I mean… if I was a Trump I'd have my name etched into one of these Snow Peak titanium flasks in big block letters and then filled in with 24k gold, but I haven't found anything inspiring at a reasonable price.

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jhaus
0
Jhaus  - Sept. 15, 2016, 11:42 a.m.

Stanley Classic flask, no contest. Rugged, doesn't leak, more pack-friendly shape, and holds 8oz of your preferred trailside first aid liquid. Under $20 US.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 15, 2016, 12:10 p.m.

That's a good looking flask:

At first I thought the name of their colours was "Hammertime".

Reply

tj-quinn
0
TJ Quinn  - Sept. 8, 2016, 5:45 p.m.

I highly recommend getting rid of the Tylenol. Acetametaphin has a very poor success rate in pain relief but a very high success rate in damaging your liver. In fact it is one of the leading causes of liver failure in the United States. Switch to ibuprofen.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 6:49 p.m.

Thanks; I'll definitely check out the link when I have a few minutes!

Reply

andrew-bell
0
Andrew Bell  - Sept. 9, 2016, 5:44 a.m.

I suffered a concussion the other day and the Doctors told me not to take Ibuprofen as it thins the blood meaning if I would of had internal bleeding the advil would encourage the bleeding making the injury worse. Something to keep in mind at least after initially crashing until your injuries can be diagnosed.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 9, 2016, 10:18 a.m.

I don't know TJ and Andrew, my wife says I should skip the Acetametaphins AND the Ibuprofens and instead to take Aleve (active ingredient: Naproxen) because, and I quote, "that's what doctors tell old people to take."

Between the three of you I'm thinking of ditching the pills and just adding a second flask to my kit. Maybe some Tequila for variation. That's proven to be great for head wounds and fine for livers in reasonable dosages right?!

Reply

wannabemd
0
WannaBeMD  - Sept. 11, 2016, 4:15 a.m.

Depends what you're using the drug for. Acetaminophen will only damage your liver if you take a very large dose (for example 8 tablets at once, unfortunately it's a common and very painful method of suicide) or if taken with alcohol as there's an alternative metabolism pathway it engages that will toast your liver. It's actually a pretty good drug if used correctly and would probably be my pick out of the over-the-counter pain drugs.

Ibuprofen is better if you're dealing with muscle tears and stuff because it's an anti-inflammatory and so treats the source of the pain rather than just blocking it (but don't take it for more than a few days as it'll delay your recovery and potentially give you peptic ulcer disease). The bleeding risk is a thing though in severe injuries so be careful with that one.

Aspirin should probably be avoided for trauma scenarios like bike crashes because it's an anti-platelet agent aka it stops the stuff that prevents you from bleeding to death in an injury.

Antihistamine is a very good idea. Might just add that one to my trail kit…

Moral of the story? Follow the label, and if you've crashed hard enough to need pain killers you probably need a trip to ER

Reply

cerealkilla_
0
jdt  - Sept. 9, 2016, 6:39 p.m.

I'm on the fence for the painkillers. What about ANTIHISTAMINES!!!….We're talking about something that most definitely can save a life. I used to tuck them into my handlebars when racing. Ended up giving them to a fellow racer one year when we hit a wasp nest (I went first, he got stung). Hard tablet forms in tinfoil last for a long time.

Reply

tj-quinn
0
TJ Quinn  - Sept. 11, 2016, 2:56 p.m.

Great point! This is something I will start to carry.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 11, 2016, 10:32 p.m.

Awesome suggestion!

Reply

mike
0
mike  - Sept. 11, 2016, 6:32 a.m.

Acetaminophen works well as a mild pain reliever, and when combined with ibuprofen works better than ibuprofen alone. While it can damage your liver, it won't when used according to the instructions.

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tj-quinn
0
TJ Quinn  - Sept. 11, 2016, 3:05 p.m.

I would not be surprised to see acetaminophen off the market in the next 3-5 years. It will damage your liver even when taken according to instructions. Unfortunately it is a money maker which seems to trump the welfare of the customer. Like I said (and posted citation), it is the number one reason for ER visits due to acute liver failure. Like many drugs, it builds up over time and takes a long time for the liver to break down, so people taking a "safe amount" on a routine basis are getting knocked down. Furthermore, it is not an NSAID which is primarily what you need for "most" bike injuries. Ibuprofen is proven to reduce swelling and relieve pain in a much larger percentage of the population.
I do agree that acetaminophen can assist ibuprofen when take together as ibuprofen is broken down in the kidneys while acetaminophen effects the liver.

Reply

chris-duncan
0
Chris Duncan  - Sept. 12, 2016, 12:59 a.m.

@tjquinn:disqus
Acetaminophen is the safest painkiller to have on a mountain bike ride (don't take more than 3000mg a day. Acetaminophen is in in part metabolized by an enzyme that prevents free radical oxidation as long as you make enough of that enzyme a day, which a healthy liver does, then you won't have liver toxicity issues). The risk of damage from acetaminophen in one day or just a few days of use is very low provided you stay below the recommended dosing. people get into trouble thinking it's a "harmless or safe medication" and often taking more than the prescribed limit or unbeknownst to them, having a liver enzyme deficiency (that's why personalized medicine is the next big thing.)

Ibuprofen (an NSAID, like aspirin or aleve) on the other hand, increases the time needed for blood to clot resulting in greater risk for bleeding in the brain/around the brain or in other areas after a possible unexpected crash. As a result, I've seen people taking aspirin (its effects sticks around for one week after taking it) and ibuprofen (sticks around for about two days after taking it) with severe bleeding in the brain after relatively minor falls. Additionally, ibuprofen decreases the amount of blood that gets to the kidneys causing a trifecta of badness if you're dehydrated or have elevated muscle breakdown products ( say from a long ride) etc. Lastly, ibuprofen but notably not acetaminophen, have been associated with higher risk for cardiovascular events including heart attack and stroke in the long run. The safest NSAID, at least for those complications, is probably naproxen.

Sorry for the long post I just wanted to clarify a few things.

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andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Sept. 8, 2016, 12:09 p.m.

Cleat bolts, hunks of chain and quick link. A couple bolts and zip ties. Tube ans multi tool and pump. I think that's the most I carry. And of course making sure the bike is up to snuff before I head out the door.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 1:47 p.m.

What multi-tool do you prefer Andy? I know you must have a strong preference (make and model?)

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Sept. 8, 2016, 5:05 p.m.

I have a couple Lezyne tools but you need to add a 2.5 I think or is it a 3 mm for adjusting Shimano pedal tension. I was given a Park super multi thing that weighs enough to be used as a weapon against attacking squirrels but it broke first time I used it. I fixed it with better bolts but still.

Reply

whatyouthink
0
whatyouthink  - Sept. 8, 2016, 9:57 a.m.

Looks like your pack could use a tube….

I started carrying a long handle 8mm for pedals because sometimes they come loose, no 10mm needed on my bike.

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:30 a.m.

Ha. Yes buried in my pack is a universal donor tube (26″) and I always have a light at this time of year. Gets dark quick.

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Reverend
0
Tim Ambler  - Sept. 8, 2016, 9:50 a.m.

Am I the only one who finds multi-tools a PITA? I still carry the cheapo 2 through 8mm hex key set that you get at MEC. Seems to get me or other people out of 99% of jams with a minimum of fuss and it's less than 100g, cheap, and not bulky…. Put a guys crank arm back on earlier this week with <30min to sunset because he didn't have an 8mm on his tool.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:37 a.m.

Also saved a guy's ride with an 8mm a few nights ago - his crank arm was coming off. The thing that bothers me about multi-tools are floppy chain breakers. Used one of those recently, too, but it had been a while since it was needed. Carrying a separate one like Drew does seems superfluous, but when you need one…

Reply

cooper
0
Cooper  - Sept. 8, 2016, 9:49 a.m.

No tire patch kit or plugs? But, even MORE importantly, no first aid kit??!?!

Also, I'll say bad things about CrankBrothers components all day, but their multi-tools and pumps are actually pretty awesome. Eliminate some of the clutter you've got going on there by consolidation.

You're also missing chainpins.

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:28 a.m.

Pretty sure I noted my first aid kit?!

No, I don't take band aids into the woods. Tubes make great slings what else in your kit have you needed on a ride?

Realized I "lent" out my quick links… will replace thanks!

Reply

cooper
0
Cooper  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:57 a.m.

I'm ALL for having a flask. Hopefully your Surly one came with the same waterbottle mount mine did.

But seriously. First aid kit. I've used… well, lots of it. Tubes may make a great sling, but they're not so good for stabilizing other body parts, closing wounds, compression (no, tourniquet doesn't count…) etc. Superglue is good to have.

And I've never trusted quicklinks for some strange reason. Always carry chainpins, they fit perfectly in my Dynaplug Micro Pro Suppository.

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muldman
0
muldman  - Sept. 8, 2016, 2:20 p.m.

I carry a minimal first-aid kit:

  • A couple of LARGE bandaids (10cm x 10cm)
  • A couple tabs of Ibuprofen
  • A small roll of gauze
  • A bit of moleskin
  • Some antiseptic wipes and small packet of polysporin (there is a LOT of cow shit on the local trails this time of year…)
  • Gorilla tape (also part of the tool kit)

This all packs up into a very small, very light package. The bandaids are the largest thing in there.

Slings, etc. can be fashioned out of backpack straps and tubes when need be. Larger bandages can be fashioned out of jerseys, etc. (If you need something more than the basic kit, sacrificing some riding clothes will be the least of your worries!)

I've used this more than once this year…

The larger first aid kit stays in the vehicle, but this minimal kit gets you back to the trail head.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Sept. 8, 2016, 5:08 p.m.

That flask IS Drew's first aid kit. Take a swig, dump some on the wound, take another deep slug and HTFU.

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 6:46 p.m.

Great break down!

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jonas-dodd
0
Jonas Dodd  - Sept. 9, 2016, 9:38 a.m.

Also in my kit: two triangular bandages. Any time you have to get someone out with a shoulder or arm injury these are invaluable and provide huge comfort.

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craw
0
Cr4w  - Sept. 11, 2016, 12:27 p.m.

These are the best bang for your buck space-wise as they cover a huge range. A triangle bandage, an antiseptic wipe and a bunch of electrical tape rolled around your pump covers a huge range of common riding injuries. This is what I keep in my fanny pack on smaller rides. For bigger rides I include a more elaborate kit that includes a SAM splint (bulky but really light) and a tensor.

This is a great thread.

Reply

brad-sedola
0
Brad Sedola  - Sept. 8, 2016, 9:33 a.m.

Nice to see I'm not the only guy bringing odd-ball flavoured first aid out on our group rides. I assume you have a patch kit somewhere in that mess? Not related to bike maintenance, still a tool, I bring a small folding saw to deal with downed limbs/small trees.

Reply

jonas-dodd
0
Jonas Dodd  - Sept. 9, 2016, 9:35 a.m.

I've used my bahco saw countless times everywhere from burnaby mountain to the chilcotins and it's still sharp as fk. Also good in case you need to make a travois to haul your buddy out…

Reply

Jerry-Rig
0
Jerry Willows  - Sept. 8, 2016, 8:37 a.m.

no duct tape?

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 8:43 a.m.

Actually had a small roll of Gorilla tape to use for patching tires and etc. Not sure where it got to… good reminder!

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pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:38 a.m.

Roll it onto the barrel of your pump, then it's always there when you need it. Skiers roll it onto their ski poles. Essential.

Reply

Henry-Chinaski
0
Henry Chinaski  - Sept. 8, 2016, 8:18 a.m.

The contents of my pack is usually dependent on how deep the ride is. That said, I always carry 9, 10, and 11 speed power links to help speed up the occasional chain break. I ride alone much of the time, so I also carry 3 bear bangers and a pen launcher. Nice to be able to sound louder than your group size.

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0
Perry Schebel  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:49 a.m.

you guys and your preparedness. here's a pic of my edc tool kit:

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:12 a.m.

Standardized fasteners on bikes would be awesome, but given how little agreement we can get on anything else [hubs, tire sizes/widths, etc…] it seems unlikely we can agree on fasteners!

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:10 a.m.

I carry more stuff than most people I ride with. I rarely use the items in my pack myself, but I reasonably frequently help others patch up their bikes or themselves. It's good trail karma.

One thing I have noticed is that people likely to carry a fully stocked pack are the ones least likely to have a bike that's in need of trail side maintenance. 😉

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:26 a.m.

Ha! Yes.

I've never needed a headset spacer myself (and don't want to dwell on the circumstances that result in riders being in the woods without enough of them) but the look on a fellow traveller's face when you resolve their sloppy, rattling, fork/headset in the middle of nowhere is definitely worth a couple grams in the pack!

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Sept. 8, 2016, 10:33 a.m.

That must've been some kind of satisfying feeling.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:03 p.m.

And a delicious post ride beer and awesome new riding friend!

Reply

D_C_
0
DMVancouver  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:03 a.m.

My DM ring (SRAM X01 GXP) has come loose a few times, and is often a source of creaking. I need to loctite the crap out of the bolts.

Reply

drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 7:23 a.m.

For best results I'd go loctite on the threads and grease at the heads of the bolts and on the ring/crank spline interface. Just have to make sure the grease and loctite don't contact..

If you swap rings a lot go blue loctite but if you run one into the ground like I do and it's a concern it may be worth it go red?

Reply

tuskalooa
0
tuskalooa  - Sept. 8, 2016, 12:37 a.m.

a month ago pulled into the parking lot and found two guys fettling turns out one of them had lost a brake caliper bolt before their ride even started, couldn't help them really. They (don't ask) removed the headset bolt and used that. Anyhow I kept thinking to myself how do you forget to screw on your bolts after removing them. Fast forward one month later took my son out on his newly built bike by dad-himself and kept hearing a rattling sound lo and behold we are missing one M6 bolt on the front caliper.. we made do on the ride. But swore never to upset the mtb-karma-gods again and now carry a spare.

Yeah as you say sod's law will always intervene on that one ride when you say naw don't need this bit and somewhere along you will need just that bit you chucked back in your spare/tool box. now thinking of carrying a spare gear cable.

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 1:01 a.m.

I've noticed them loose on friends bikes in the parking lot more than once… always after a 'quick' brake adjustment. Everyone's minds on too many distractions these days. Since I had kid I'm doubly sure to go over every accessible bolt quickly before I ride.

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grasbi
0
grasbi  - Sept. 7, 2016, 11:58 p.m.

Thanks for sharing. I had a few little and light items added to my toolroll, which were useful in the past. A spare shifter cable (we fixed a chainring issue with that, McGyver style), a few spare chain links and/or a chainlock, a spare chain bolt (those little things are easly lost on the trail).

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drewm
0
DrewM  - Sept. 8, 2016, 12:55 a.m.

I carry a spare 26″ tube 'the universal donor' in my pack (neglected to pull it out for the photo) and this time of year always some kind of light!

Great reminder re. chain links. I 'lent' both my quick links to friends and should definitely replace those.

Reply

AlanB
0
AlanB  - Sept. 10, 2016, 11:36 a.m.

My crappiest tube stays in my pack for the same reason.

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commenter19
0
Commenter19  - Sept. 7, 2016, 10:09 p.m.

The torque needed for SRAM (and apparently RF) cranks is enough to keep me looking back to Shimano every time I have to take them on or off. If they only had a simple direct mount chainring system with a 28 tooth ring I'd switch all my bikes back to shimano in a heart beat.

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NealWood
0
NealWood  - Oct. 17, 2017, 10:05 p.m.

Spent a night out in the bush semi lost once.  I would have killed for a lighter.  Carried one ever since.

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