SQLab 60X Infinergy Saddle NSMB Andrew Major
REVIEW

To Infinergy? SQlab 60X Active Saddles

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Oct 10, 2022
Reading time

On A Cloud

I was excited for my first ride on the new 60X Active saddle from SQlab. This is their first saddle that's made in Germany and it uses a unique application of BASF Infinergy foam, which is popular for running shoes. It's a robust material that has excellent damping and rebound properties, and it's ecologically friendly. That eco-factor comes thanks not only to long-term durability but also to local sourcing and strict German environmental guidelines.

Here I'm reviewing a 14cm 60X Infinergy Active. I'm confident that I wear a medium helmet, wear a size 43 shoe, and ride a 14cm saddle. This is important to mention as my first experience with the 60X Infinergy Active has been riding a pre-production 15cm version on my commuter bike. It is like riding on a cloud around the city, but it's too wide at the back for me to be comfortable trail riding with it.

SQLab 60X Infinergy Saddle NSMB Andrew Major (4)

SQlab's Active saddles get folks back on mountain bikes, out for longer rides, and generally make a difference worth their weight in gold.

SQLab 60X Infinergy Saddle NSMB Andrew Major (3)

If you haven't already, I always recommend trying them with the elastomers removed completely. It's how I run mine. I don't think it's affected durability in a notable way. But I do think most folks will appreciate the boost in comfort.

611 Active

The 611 Active was my first SQlab saddle and I've recommended them to many riders. It's not a universal recommendation though. The Active platform does an excellent job providing support while not interfering with pedaling motion. It also damps trail noise to a significant degree. I've yet to recommend the saddle to anyone with back issues who didn't notice an immediate improvement.

The 611 is the best shape from SQlab if you're riding a bike with a slacker seat tube angle (STA). SQlab tries to use little graphics showing rider position - more or less upright - to recommend saddle shapes but this is oversimplified to make shopping and selling easier. I ride quite upright positions on all my bikes but the 611 shape is better on my Waltworks and other bikes with a slacker STA, in my case 73.5°. The SQlab 60X is a preferred shape on any bike with a steeper STA, for example, the Banshee Titan with its 76° STA or the We Are One Arrival with its 77° STA.

I haven't been riding the 611 lately as I've found the perfect blend of what I love about this saddle and the stub-nosed WTB Koda in the form of the BikeYoke Sagma. The Sagma works great on both my 73.5° Walt and my 76° Marin Rifty 29". While I appreciate the smaller dimensions of the Sagma, I still find myself recommending the 611 more often. The Sagma is like a more comfortable and more expensive Koda but it won't change your experience like an SQlab Active saddle.

SQLab 611 Saddle AndrewM

SQlab's 611 Active is the perfect choice for folks trying to manage discomfort in their backs or sit bones on bikes with slacker STAs. For example, my Kona Explosif sat around 73° static.

60X versus 60X

With most bikes sporting steeper seat tube angles, I've started recommending the pre-Infinergy SQlab 60X regularly. This shift started with the Banshee Titan and has continued through multiple bikes including the Arrival I'm currently reviewing. I don't have an exact cutoff point but on a bike with a 76° or steeper STA, I recommend riders either try both or start with the 60X over the 611. The 60X makes me appreciate riding steeper STAs and makes them more fun on climbs especially. As with other SQlab saddles, I recommend buying true-to-size, so if your sit bones measure out to 14cm buy that.

My first ride on the saddle I'm reviewing here was a poor one. Despite a number of on-trail adjustments, I could not find a comfortable position and by the end of my ride, my sit bones were sore. As much as I enjoy the fit of the wider 15cm Infinergy saddle on my commuter, I wouldn't consider mountain biking with it due to the body-English restrictions of the size relative to my stance.

The traditional covered-foam construction of the 60X Active has another advantage over the taped-high-wear sections of the exposed foam Infinergy version that I discovered on my second ride. Infinergy really sticks to some clothing. My favourite pair of Leatt DBX shorts and my MUSA not-pants from Rivendell both grab the Infinergy saddle at exactly the wrong time, every time.

Both those pairs of bottoms have textured finishes, so your cycling wardrobe may not be affected in the same way. My other properly trashed and loved bottoms - my Leatt DBX pants and my Kitsbow Haskell shorts - have no interface issues at all. While I've come to terms with the Infinergy saddle, this is a deal breaker that would point me towards the non-Infinergy version.

SQLab 60X Saddle NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

If you have a steeper, certainly 76°+, STA and a desire for a more comfortable saddle that won't interfere with your pedaling, and especially if you're managing issues with your back or sit-area, the 60X Active Ergowave from SQlab is an easy top of the list for saddles to try.

SQLab 60X Active Saddle NSMB AndrewM.JPG

Just remember to do yourself a favour and give it a ride or two with all the elastomer inserts removed. The 611 & 60X Active saddles also played a key role in my ditching the chamois forever, even on long-long rides.

The Infinergy Customer

"The 6OX is the optimal saddle for long and steep climbs on the EMTB while providing optimal relief, even on bikes without an engine. This means that the rider no longer has to take power-consuming protective positions, so all the energy is available for propulsion." - SQlab

I came to terms with the 14cm version of the 60X Infinergy saddle when I went back and read SQlab's description of the seat. Ignoring the broped marketing - what cycling products aren't 'e-bike optimized' these days? - the clear intention of the new Infinergy saddle is for riders climbing seated, well over the pedals. This was actually relatively easy to replicate as my Rift Zone is currently under-forked and sports a -2° angle set. I swapped out the 27" rear wheel from my mullet setup for a 29" and the end result was a significantly steeper STA than I'd normally prefer to ride. This combination makes the Infinergy saddle much more comfortable, and actually, I enjoyed pedaling the steep STA more than I expected, thanks entirely to the saddle.

SQLab 60X Infinergy Saddle NSMB Andrew Major (12)

This is the most neutral saddle position - rails relative to clamps - I've had on a bike with a steep STA. I'd enjoy riding some bikes I've previously discounted based on their very-steep effective seat angles with the 60X Infinergy installed.

It may sound dumb when I say that a saddle shape can somewhat 'fix' my fit issues with bikes with the steepest saddle-over-bottom bracket (BB) riding positions but that's been my experience here. The saddle isn't moving me back to my preferred position more behind the BB but on the 60X Infinergy I feel like I have more power in a seated climbing position than normal. I still wouldn't purchase a rig with a STA that steep, hoping a saddle would fix it, but it's nifty that this could be a solution for folks who've been fighting the steep-STA fit on their mountain bike.

Where I'd recommend the SQlab 611 saddle for slacker STA bikes, and the 60X Active for steeper STA bikes, it's fair to say that the optimum comfort zone for the Infinergy saddle is when bikes get steeper yet. If you love the regular 60X with a slacker position or generally prefer a steeper STA already, the new 60X Infinergy could work for you.

The SQlab 60X Active Infinergy saddle works well for me in a narrow set of circumstances - frames with steep STAs - that I don't generally put myself onto. I generally prefer bikes with STA angles slacker than 76º which puts me in a minority of riders I know. Steep seat tube angles are the key to short chainstays and fitting the longest possible reach and folks are bought in.

If you're riding a bike with a steep, saddle over the bottom bracket, pedaling position, and looking for a saddle to alleviate numbness, pedaling pain, or to manage other issues, like back trouble, this could be the saddle for you. I'd still save 70 CAD and choose the regular SQlab 60X Active over this German-made Infinergy model, as the non-Infinergy option works much better for me on a broader range of bikes.

The 60X Ergowave with Infinergy Foam comes in four sizes - 13cm, 14cm, 15cm, and 16cm - and while I've always previously recommended staying true to size, on a slacker STA rig, consider the pros and cons of bumping up to a wider setup. This saddle will run you 270 CAD | 200 USD which is a healthy pile of money if you don't need the support and flex of an SQlab saddle and a great bargain if it gets you out riding longer, more comfortably, and more often. There's more information at SQlab. I always recommend checking out saddles in person if you can.

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Comments

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major Timer

This is where I wish for a saddle library. I have a stack of a dozen or so I've accumulated, but haven't found my chamois free unicorn yet.

$200+ is too rich for me to take a punt. 

Suggestions from the hive mind welcome, current favourites are Chromag Mood and WTB Volt (on different bikes - the Volt was no good on the FS). Silverado no good, Bel-Air 2 no good, Spesh Phenom close but not quite...

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

You know how I feel about the idea of a saddle library - yes, please. 

Have you ridden the WTB Koda? It's my favourite saddle on a budget, and for those that love it and are looking for that next step, the Sagma is amazing. 

Where the SQlab saddles win, and price becomes less of a concern for any passionate mountain biker regardless of their means, is when the Active tech is making a notable difference to their riding in terms of comfort, longevity, or for some folks just making it possible. 

Put another way, I know a few folks who wouldn't have spent more than a c-note on a saddle until they couldn't ride. I think my friend Adam for example, once he tried my 611 Active, would have paid any price after the number of months he was off his bike.

Reply

GiveitsomeWelly
Karl Fitzpatrick
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major Velocipedestrian

I took a punt on a Koda. 

Very different to the Charge Spoon I was used to. In a good way. 

I don't (or am unable to) ride for longer than a few hours at a time due to dadlyfe so i haven't been able to test the all day bum-fort (a-hur-hur).

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I know I’ve written about it ad nauseum, but the history of the Koda is still my favourite bike fit light bulb moment. From being narrowly marketed as a women’s saddle to being their best overall saddle for the most rides with nothing but a change of attitude.

Reply

wishiwereriding
John Keiffer
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major HughJass

I bought a Koda in a size too wide, and didn't get on with it. I also bought an SQLab 611 and didn't quite like that either. I ran that one without the elastomers too. I just always go back to and still love my Devas.

Reply

Rowdy
Rowdy
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I’ll take the Diva because that’s just my identity.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

WTB Deva is an awesome seat if you like it - I do - but the Koda is a much more universal recommendation.

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

No joy with the Deva or Silverado. On the lookout for a lightly used Koda

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I think it’s fair to say, from folks who’ve tried a lot of WTB saddles, that if they were going to pair down to one seat the Koda would be the clear winner. 

Interesting that BikeYoke makes one saddle (Sagma) and it and the Koda are very similar in terms of shape and size.

fartymarty
fartymarty
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Try a Chromag Trailmaster (or LTD).  It's a copy of the old Azonic Journey Saddle from years ago.  I generally ride nappyless on it and have done some reasonably big rides on it.

Saying that a SQ is on my list to try tho once the Trailmaster dies.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

The SQ is so much more forgiving in every direction of the TM when pedaling while also being more supportive, it’s quite bizarre. Did love my Trail Master LTD for sliding up the nose on steep climbs though. They are similarly ‘big’ saddles. 

If they had done a Mood/Moon in the LTD leather treatment that would have been my saddle, especially while I still rocket a chamois. Quite like the mini-TM (AKA Juniper) now.

Reply

fartymarty
fartymarty
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Food for thought.  I'll put the SQ at the top of the "new saddle" list.

Reply

4Runner1
4Runner1
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Goes to show how personal saddle choice is. I tried a TM and it was painful. I never doubted the design or quality though. Just didn’t fit me.

Reply

fartymarty
fartymarty
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major 4Runner1

Saddles, bars, pedals and grips are the things you can never have too many options for.

Reply

TristanC
TristanC
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I'm very happy with my BikeYoke Sagma, been chamoisless on it for over 2 years. 20+ hour rides, no problems.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Nothing fits me like a Sagma/Koda personally and the Sagma rail system works. 

That said, I always encourage folks to keep SQ Active in mind. We all have a friend whose back or sits are keeping them from being on the bike as much as they like and these saddles can be experience changing.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
AndrewR
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I have not tried it personally, as I get on with the 611 Active 13 cm and have them on all my bikes, but I have heard very good things about the heat mouldable Reform saddle. I have heard several stories from riders and guests that this saddle has helped them resolve serious saddle sore and other issues that were otherwise limiting or stopping their riding. One chap is a serious bike packer who can now do BC Epic level hours on his bike without a chamois.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Reform is interesting. Apparently there will be a more upright-fit MTB version in the future? I don’t think that I just made that up… but can’t remember where I heard it.

Reply

Timer
Timer
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

What issues did you have with the Phenom? I've had good luck with the Specialized Bridge, its kind of a halfway-point between the Phenom and the Koda.

I like both the Koda and my SQlab, but the Bridge is my favorite. Just be aware that the different pricepoints come with very different foam thickness.

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Just the usual sit bones. It was great with a chamois, but I'm very keen to ditch it.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

So hard to make saddle suggestions for someone else, but these work for me:

  • Selle Anatomica
  • Brooks B17
  • WTB Pure
  • Ergon Enduro SM

I've been diaper-free for quite a few years. For trail riding I can ride any of these saddles all day for as many days in a row as I want. For touring/gravel/road [8-12hrs+/day seated] I'd stick with the top two options.

Depending on your vendor options there may be the opportunity to try a saddle for a day or two as long as you can return it in like new condition or selling a new saddle less a "demo" fee shouldn't be too hard.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Demo programs consistently- every brand I’ve dealt with - fail to live up to anyone’s expectations.

Especially when we’re talking about choosing a saddle that costs two bills I’d love to see saddle libraries.

I’m under no illusions that it’s an easy thing to run. Just look at what a hard time publicly funded libraries have getting people to return books. But I envision a $50 membership fee where you get 1/2 back towards the purchase of a saddle when you decide what’s best for you. I think I could get the vast majority of folks on saddles they love with around 20x SKUs. 

Anyway, like my Waltworks I draw this out in the clouds all the time, but unlike my Waltworks I clearly haven’t taken the risk to try and make it happen.

Reply

araz
araz
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I bought my 611 from REI knowing I could return it if it didn't work out. Unfortunately I don't think they sell SQ Lab anymore. I do love the saddle -- first time I've been able to ride chamois-less.

Just bought an Ergon saddle for my wife at REI, again because of the generous return policy. 

If I remember right, SQ Lab does take returns for a shortish period after purchase -- long enough to give it a go and see if it works. 

I have a Selle Italia novus evo on my gravel bike that works well for me, though I'm not sure how it'd be on the MTB.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Suns_PSD

SQlab the company was recently purchased and in North America the supply is a shit show right now at a dealer level (online/direct is good to go).

It’s too bad as Mark and the folks at SKS USA who were handling distribution are amazing people and everyone I’ve talked to from shops to individual riders loved dealing with them.

On a personal level it was really nice to have Orange Sport distributing them in Canada as they’re local here in North Vancouver. It meant that any time I was recommending a 12d or 16d 30X bar to a friend or acquaintance they could go into any local shop and have one within a day or two. My understanding is they’re no longer carrying the brand as well.

This is why I’m constantly pumping Chromag for a 16d sweep FU40 or FU50 bar. Nice to have an option that’s available localish.

Reply

fartymarty
fartymarty
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major Vik Banerjee

I would buy a 16 degree FU50 tomorrow.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Vik Banerjee

I’d buy two. The ‘high’ version of the 30X isn’t that high.

Reply

fartymarty
fartymarty
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Agreed.  It's the flattest bar I have behind my 50 and 70mm Ergotecs but they're only 12 degrees.  

A 16FU50 would be so sweet.

andrewbikeguide
AndrewR
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

It is the lowest 45 mm I have ever seen! But still a good bar. 

I would try the Whiskey Milhouse if they ever had it in stock

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Honestly, depends on the price and if they can get it as good as SQ Lab have their alloy version, which from all reports from those who've tried both, is much more "compliant" than the carbon version, which would only add to it's abilities to ease hand issues, and similar price, then yes.

Reply

handsomedan
handsomedan
3 months, 2 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

Should we start an online petition for 800 mm wide bars with high rise and 12-16 degrees backsweep?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 2 weeks ago
0

First e-mail is to the good folks at Chromag asking for a 16° FU50. Second e-mail is to ProTaper asking for a 16° version of their 76mm riser bar. I'll be mentioning both in an upcoming piece.

Reply

Skato75
Skato75
3 months, 2 weeks ago
0

If anyone is looking to give them a try and near Fromme, you can pop into Lynn Valley Bikes and they have demo 611 Actives avail to try out.

Reply

bfraser
bfraser
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Despite their tires, I have found that Tioga makes really comfortable saddles. The spyder visually takes some getting used to, but are very comfortable, especially on a hardtail.

https://www.tiogausa.com/saddles-main.html

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I had and liked a Spyder, but the flex led to material fatigue, and the shell cracked.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

@Velo - Very happy with the PureV, now Pure from WTB. Works well on all bikes for me, but differing versions, as lower end has softer foam and higher end firmer - currently on the Chromo version on all bikes except Pro on Monkey commuter . Have a friend who has the Volt and another got one to replace a Silverado and I gave it a try, but the comfort zone thing is much bigger and makes the saddle sag in the middle for me, so sticking to the Pure for now. The Volt is very similar in shape to the Pure, not as much of a kick in the tail and the comfort zone as said is longer and further towards the back of the saddle.

Like you, I'd love to give something else a try, but not a snow balls chance in hell I'd be dropping that sort of coin to try and maybe hate it. To their 30X 16 degree sweep bars though, those I can def recommend, wish I had another or two.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Pure V was a local top seller for years. It’s also still my brother Crash Test’s favourite. 

I do think the Koda is their most universally friendly perch, but no argument with folks who’ve tried a few things and come back to the Pure.

-

I will say again that an SQlab saddle seems a lot less expensive when it’s the difference between riding or not (or pedaling two hours instead of one).

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Well, luckily for me, I don't seem to have any such issues of not being able to ride for hours, could be that I've found my "golden unicorn" saddle on the Pure. Hack for the last few years since I broke my knee, I don't even ride with a chamois anymore, only just started back 'cause really have not been riding lately, so loosing the toughness. 

I took a look at the Koda and it looks like a pretty nice saddle, can see why people would choose it, but then can also easily see why I like the Pure, the nose has more of a curve, which would suit someone who likes to climb and not on a steep STA , so needs to use the entire saddle. Grabbed the side on pics for a comparison and super easy to see the nose difference. What they don't show, but think is important, is where the "comfort zone" area is, because like the Volt, it may be further back compared to the Pure, which to me I don't like.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

This comment has been removed.

andy-eunson
Andy Eunson
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+2 Andrew Major JVP

I’ve been pretty happy with my 611 Active in 13 cm width. Interestingly with the soft elastomer my back started to give serious pain. Went with the black one which is the most stiff and things seemed to improve. Then worse again but it turned out that my si joint was out probably from a fall I had walking a steep trail.  Once the physio fixed that I went back to the soft white elastomer and it’s good now. 

Chamois’  are not really about padding as much as sweat absorption and sticking to your butt so you don’t chafe. All the good shorts now have an elastic chamois that moves with you. I tried without but my butt did not like it at all.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Michael

For anyone who's interested, this is a photo from today of my setup on the identical bike/setup with the BikeYoke Sagma instead of the SQlab 60X Infinergy. Note the saddle is significantly more rearward in the rails. 

Reply

tanadog
tanadog
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Andy Eunson

I have a bike Yoke saddle and kinda like the idea, but it's too narrow for me. Based on that and your article it seems a 15cm SQ would fit?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Have you ever measured your sit bones? Any larger sized local shop probably will have a memory foam measuring device or I like the corrugated cardboard setup myself.

Put a piece of thick corrugated cardboard on a firm surface and sit down on it leaned forward in the approximate position you sit on your bike. Measure the divots your sit bones make center-to-center.

If the Sagma is too narrow at 14cm you’ll most likely be a 15cm or even 16cm - though you do need to balance max comfort with room to move around on a mountain bike. In a 15cm I’d check out the appropriate SQLab perch and also the Specialized saddle program.

Reply

4Runner1
4Runner1
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 FuTAnT

Finding the correct saddle took me a few years and more than a few saddles. I came upon Ergon SM and it was a revelation. No more sore back. No more sore groin!

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 4Runner1

Ergon makes some great products too. I haven’t had a opportunity to review them for NSMB but I’ve got along quite well with a couple different versions of the SM.

Reply

FuTAnT
FuTAnT
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I have a 612 Ergowave for the trainer / Cyclocross bike downstairs, and an Ergon SM Pro for the MTB. The SQ Lab website does a pretty good job of explaining what you said, with regards to more upright position, i.e. the 60X is designed for more upright, the 611 more XC or a crouched position, which would also mean a slacker seat tube perhaps? All about the crouch rather than the seat angle though, wherever that lands.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 2 weeks ago
0

I think that's a better (but less simple/marketing friendly) way to think about it. Whether a steeper STA with a long and low setup or a slacker STA with a shorter setup the actual rider position 'crouch' could end up looking very much the same.

Reply

Suns_PSD
Suns_PSD
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Andrew Major

I just adore SQLab saddles. They really fixed a lot of issues for me.

Also recently added 1 to my trainer and what a HUGE improvement that was after testing half a dozen pretty good saddles beforehand.

They are worth the money imo.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Did you test them on your own dime or do you have a local shop with a good demo program?

Reply

Kenny
Kenny
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Andy Eunson

These look to be shaped almost halfway between a 610 and 611?

I really like the stepped 610 on my slack-ish seat tubed full suspension. 

On steep technical climbs it really helps me feel locked in and like I can really push against it and make power (for the portions where I'm in the saddle.)

I have a Koda and a 611 active with no insert and they both have their strengths but for tech climbing the 610 is just ace for me. I run it a little bit nose-down which accentuates the "pushing platform" even more.

Reply

Sebov
Sebov
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I tried a lot of saddle including the first generation of 611 active with the narrower nose. 

My preferred saddle right now is the Power Mimic Comp from Specialized: step like design at the end, short nose. Would have liked the elsaton version but I couldn‘t find a good offer for it.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 woofer2609

Specialized has an excellent saddle program.

Reply

tranqui_yanqui
Ryan S
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I dont recommed taking out the elastomers. I took mine out and cracked the shell shortly after.  I then badly bent the rails on the following SQlab saddle. Since buying one sans-elastomer, I've had better luck with durability.  I thought I'd found my perfect saddle with SQlab, but have been somewhat bummed about durability.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

As always, your experience may vary. Do you think having the elastomer installed would prevented the shell from cracking or rails from bending?

It’s the first story I’ve heard of one breaking - but then, if you take an infinite number of examples everything breaks.

Reply

BarryW
BarryW
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Do chatting with the folks at the SQ Lab booth at Sea Otter they said the old 60x you can run without elastomers, but they highly recommend not doing so with the new Infinergy model. I belive they said cracking was the possible issue. 

I bought into the SQ Lab active over a year ago and love it. Best saddle ever and it never makes me numb. I'm also a reformed roadie (at least as a teenager) so I'm a spin fast, high pedalling cadence rider and I can't imagine not having the active part. 

My wife got 'measured' at the local Specialized shop (that I will no longer go to add their service and knowledge is horrible, not to mention literally everything is 'we can offer that in for you', but you have to pay upfront even to try, Ugh) and they got it horribly wrong so it's like 3cm off her actual size. Next purchase is a correctly sized 60X active.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

That’s an interesting bit of info from SQ that I don’t have. Not that I needed a other reason to prefer the regular 60X Active over the Infinergy.

Reply

tranqui_yanqui
Ryan S
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I don't know if removing the elastomer made a difference in the shells durability.  I didnt submit for warranty because I had the saddle far forward, a bit past the markers on the rails.  I didnt think it was fair to lay blame entirely on the manufacturer.  I'm only 170lbs but ride quite aggresively.

Reply

lev3000
lev3000
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I have SQ lab and bought the Active after reading about it on here. I did run it without the grommets and it eventually snapped.  I’m on a nine articulated one now. Still really happy with it and would recommend it for sure. You have to be patient and get the correct tilt to suit you. Once it’s dialled, it’s the best!

Reply

Jenkins5
Jenkins5
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I used to be a WTB Silverado guy, and think the SQLab 612 Ergowave is pretty comfy (but pricey) as well. I've settled on the new SDG Bel Air 3 and couldn't be happier. I get along with 140cm wide saddles, and that's all SDG has, but it's super comfortable for my behind...

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I’m getting along okay with the Bel Air 3 on the WR1 Arrival but in terms of a more universal stock option I can think of a few saddles I’d much rather see coming in the box.

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Jenkins5
Jenkins5
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Guess thats the point. Everyone's ass is different. I can't think of any other saddle that should come on the WAO. It's a great catch all that many of my friends love too....Which is why saddle reviews in general are a bit pointless IMHO....

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

I simply meant that some saddles are more universal than others, and therefore better stock options.

Inform, inspire, entertain. I think saddle reviews can be very valuable in getting folks thinking about their own setups and to try different things if they come around to the idea their current program isn’t working for them. 

It’s crazy how many folks, including some who’ve been riding a long time, just accept that their setup is going to be uncomfortable. 

I’ve had some solid success helping steer folks towards something that will work for them, through conversations started off these pieces. And particularly with SQlab pieces that has included managing back pain not just sit bone and position related discomfort.

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Heinous
Heinous
3 months, 4 weeks ago
0

SQLab were recently sold which has seen distribution shuffles around the place. Hopefully it'll lead to more development and availablility.

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moraucf
moraucf
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

+1 to the infinity foam being too grippy for aggressive riding. Always felt like I had to open up my legs more so it would not catch my shorts. It broke and the new US distributor replaced it with a saddle of my choosing so got the new 611.

The infinity foam was very comfortable though! Could see it working well on a road/commuter bike. 

SQlab still far away the best saddle I've tried and have them on all 4 of my bikes.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Did you find that over-grippy saddle experience to be the case  universally or just with certain clothing? For me it’s specific shorts/pants I wear a lot but not universal so I could choose my different clothing for Infinergy rides.

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NewMexicoNick
NewMexicoNick
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Sqlab is my saddle of choice as well. I have had a 60x, 60x infinergy, and 2 611s. After measuring my sit bones (11cm) at the revocation of sqlab I tried a 14mm 60x which proved to be too wide. I got a 13mm 60x infinergy, and I loved the padding but it was still too wide and chafed my inner thighs. Sqlabs said the 60x seats are 1cm wider than  the 611 of the same measurement. So I got a 13mm 611 which is pretty perfect, although I would love the extra padding of a 60x. I have tried them all with no elastomers, but I find that the seat starts to make cracking noises, and I don’t really feel any type of movement of the saddle anyway when pedaling. I think you are right that at narrower widths the saddles just don’t flex as much. I figured maybe it was because I don’t weigh enough.I think I might try the bike yoke you recommended.

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cyclotoine
cyclotoine
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Two years ago I bought a used 611 and an Ergon both in 15cm width from someone that had tried and not liked them. I tried both and so did my partner who was having comfort issues. The 611 was hands down the favorite, but since the majority of my rides are 1-2 hours and I generally don't get discomfort on those I choose to run inexpensive saddles and my partner kept the 611. We also let a friend try both and she loved the 611 but ergon was better enough than her current saddle that she bought that one from me. If I were riding more than 2 hours on the regular I would be buying an SQ lab saddle for sure.

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geraldooka
Michael
3 months, 2 weeks ago
0

Love the SQ Lab 30x bars but I swore I'd never try another SQ Lab saddle after using a 611 Active on a bike packing trip. I eventually nicknamed it Sven and Sven wasn't very nice to me... Since then I went through 5 billion or so saddles looking for my unicorn and found it mostly in the WTB Pure Team (with the exception of the very short saddle rails). I also recently tried a Ergon Core (same bouncy infinergy material) its pretty nice too so much so I'm looking at some of their e specific saddles now, why? Because they have this big curve on the back and while they tout it as being advantageous to motorbikes I can see it being super helpful for geared bikes too. As for SQ Lab I did get one on your recommendation Andrew,  a 60x for a steep SA bike, but it didn't help (and its still not terribly comfortable) I'd love to understand the mechanism of how it has resolved the issues for you.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 2 weeks ago
0

Hi Michael,

The Pure is a good fairly neutral saddle for a lot of folks, I'm surprised that you like the Pure but not the 611 Active running them on the same bike. Did you buy them in the same width? Same width with the 60X? Where was the discomfort mainly if I can ask a personal question - sit bones? 

I prefer a shorter saddle as my #1 go-to. It was the WTB Koda but now if I didn't review bike products I think I'd just buy a few BikeYoke Sagma saddles and forget there were other options. 

If I truly understood why the 60X works well for me on steeper seat angle bikes I certainly would have gone into more details, but it does. It feels more like my legs are actuating like I'm on a bike with a slacker STA, as I'd prefer. It's enough of a different compared to other saddles that I've hung on to the 60X as I feel it opens up bikes that normally I immediately wouldn't get along with.

When I read comments like yours my first thought is always about saddle libraries. I know plenty of folks who would spend a pile of treasure on their unicorn saddle if they could try a selection of them first. If I'm ever in a position to run my own shop it's a community service I'll find a way to provide.

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geraldooka
Michael
3 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Nah not that personal :) I have measured them at about 120mm. Discomfort was at the sit bones for sure I have luckily been spared other more male specific issues for the most part but I can't remember the last time I have ridden a saddle that didn't have some sort of divot or hole down the centre. I got the 60x in the hopes that it would resolve the steep STA on a very expensive hardtail frame that I otherwise love but since my interests now lie in less driving to trails and more riding to them that steep STA sucks, badly.

How much of a difference in angle (or saddle nose to BB setback) would you say the 60x "corrects" for you? The aforementioned hardtail I have is an actual 75.5deg static and at sag is pushing nearly 77. My acceptable saddle nose to BB setback is in the 30-50mm range with a WTB Pure, I'm feeling real comfy at 45.

Fully on board with the saddle library and I can appreciate how much of a pain in the butt it would be to manage successfully.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 1 week ago
0

Interesting re. 120mm sit bones. You were on a 13cm 611 and 60X? I wonder if those saddle are just too flat for you? Just thinking of the shape of the Pure.

Did you ever try a Fizik Gobi? Or Selle Italia SLR? I always think of them as sort of the opposite in being more rounded. What about Brooks?

My custom hardtail has an actual seat angle of 73.5d. I’m happy on the 611 on that bike, though for mountain biking I prefer a shorter nose - Koda or Sagma.

The bikes I was riding this 60X on have STA effective numbers in the 77-78 range. For comparison I run my Sagma also all the way slammed back to get a pedaling position I’m okay with and on the same bikes I had the 60X centered. 

The 60X Infinergy, as noted, really, really didn’t work for me on my own bike but it worked well with a truly steep setup. It’s merely four for thought though as saddles are so personal.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
3 months, 1 week ago
0

Saddle library would be an expensive PIA. Especially since an hour or ride is only going to tell you if you hate a saddle or not, not if it’s your unicorn. I was thinking 2-week borrowing windows. But I also think it could really improve a fair few folks experiences so maybe it pays for itself in customers who are out riding their bikes more.

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