Shimano GE9 6
REVIEW

The King is Dead. Long Live the King?

Photos Deniz Merdano
Reading time

Shimano's ME7 roamed the earth from the late cretaceous period, somehow survived the asteroid strike, and could still be found confusing mountain bikers and menacing small children until this summer, when it was replaced with the new GE9.

Before we get into the new GE9, I need to fully acknowledge the moon-boot mastery that was the ME7. There is a brand new pair of Smurf blue ME7s downstairs with a fresh set of cleats that I have been hoarding for a few years now, my own personal hedge-bet against the inevitable day when it would be dropped from Shimano's line. That day has finally arrived. God I love this shoe. It has the toe and heel protection of a proper mountain boot, that cool grippy Michelin rubber sole, a simple but surprisingly effective quick lace and ratchet buckle closure, and is still narrow enough that I don't feel like I'm pedaling clownshoes. It's the freakish love child of an XC shoe with a sturdy mountain boot; narrow underfoot but rocking a semi-mid, almost ankle height upper, complete with neoprene crud gaiter. If past experiences are anything to go by, this hoarded pair should be sufficient to last me through the rest of the Anthropocene.

Okay, so maybe the sole isn't wide enough or padded enough for the huck-to-flat set, and maybe the ratchet can sometimes get a bit crunchy, and sure, they run a little hot down here in the heat-blasted wastelands, but they otherwise check all the boxes for my particular brand of midlife ride footwear crisis. I'll say it again for the kids in the back. God l love this shoe. Moment of silence, please. (Evidently, Pete loved them too...)

Shimano_SH-ME7-13.original

Sole survivor. Out with the old. The helladurable, megacomfortable, highly tractable, not-XC but not-freeride either ME7 as seen from the business end in Pete's write up of these kicks back in 2017. Holy midfoot cleat placement, Batman.

Shimano GE9 10

And in with the new... Same view, GE9. If you wanted something wider underfoot, you got your wish.

Odes to the departed now taken care of, let's dig into the Shimano GE9. For much of the following, I will reference the ME7 that it is replacing, and will also throw on some comparison to the Specialized 2FO Cliplite BOAs that I have been running for the past year.

This is Shimano's flagship gravity shoe, designed to do the business for both DH racing and Enduro. To all intents and purposes, the GE9 is a more intentionally gravity-focused shoe than the ME7. This isn't too much of a surprise, since the GE9 is also replacing Shimano's AM9 DH shoe. The sole is wider than on the ME7 by about a centimeter, stem to stern, and is also thicker; there's a healthy layer of spongy EVA foam running from heel to toebox. As a nod to the "flagship" moniker, do not expect these shoes to be cheap. $299 of your Canadian Dollars, $225 south of the border where democracy is in flames.

No more Michelin rubber - it has been replaced by something called Ultread. According to Shimano, "Enduro-optimized SHIMANO ULTREAD GE rubber compound and tread pattern deliver reliable pedaling and hiking traction." So there. According to my built-in fingernail Mitutoyo shore hardness tester, the new Ultread rubber is softer than the old Michelin rubber. Wider sole, softer rubber, that all implies that the GE9 will be a better shoe for hiking around on wet rocks, but I haven't put that to the test yet. Because it is September in California.

The sole rubber wraps up around the toe and is bonded to a reinforced toe cap that layers protection all the way up onto the top of the rand at the front of the shoe. Cleat slots are referred to in Shimano-ese as "mid-foot"; essentially the same as the ME7, meaning you can slide the cleats waaaaay back on the shoe to capitalize on stability and senditude at the expense of cadence (cue up rambling old out of touch XC nerd rant about how this is the perfect opportunity to regain lost cadence due to pedal position biodynamics by installing some 150mm cranks...). There is also a channel in the center of the sole aft of the cleat pocket that "catches" an SPD pedal for some added stability during those unclipped drama moments.

Speedlaces are out, BOA closure is in. Ratchet buckle is gone; there's now a Velcro strap in its place. Much as I sometimes cursed the old buckles, I will miss them. The neoprene ankle gaiter remains. It does a wonderful job of keeping crud from sneaking into your socks but, as the desert dwellers attest, can contribute to feeling kinda warm in hotter ride climates. Side by side, GE9 next to ME7, it looks like the crankside ankle padding on the GE9 reaches maybe, just possibly a hair lower, but the padding feels a little bit thicker. The tongue padding on the GE9 is substantially thicker than on the ME7 (again, as it is replacing the AM9, this seems par for the course).

With regard to inevitable cross-brand comparison, the GE9 resembles the Specialized Cliplite BOA very closely in terms of sole shape and durometer, toe protection, stiffness, tongue padding and overall aesthetic. The GE9 has that neoprene gaiter and you can run the cleats noticeably farther astern in the shoe. The Specialized has two BOA closures. They both can be had in a subdued shade of green that appeals to forest dwelling creatures. The GE9 weighs about the same as the outgoing ME7, and about the same as the Cliplite BOA (according to the internet. After Mike Curiak made fun of me a while back for weighing my shoes, I broke my scale and have not personally weighed these); that is to say, about on par for modern "high protection" trail shoes and about 200g heavier per pair than most XC kicks.

Shimano GE9 9

We have not yet had a chance to assess the flotation potential of the GE9, but rest assured, the shoe pictured is not sitting on a beach, nor has it at any point housed a "disarticulated" foot.

Shimano GE9 5

That channel behind the cleat could come in handy for those grim moments of unclipped Fear...

Pedaling stiffness is good. The GE9 feels very much like the departed ME7 in terms of striking a nice balance between offering a solid pedaling platform and still being comfortable to scramble around in the woods, and to wear all day. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that the GE9 might be a little bit more comfy all around, thanks to the extra padding. I'd also say that, when new, the GE9 seems to cradle my heel a bit better than the ME7 did. AND it will absolutely offer more toe-room for the Flinstone-footed, so much so that Shimano even recommends sizing down if coming from an ME7.

As of this writing, I haven't been able to assess how that padding will hold up over time. I just unboxed these slippers yesterday. Pete has been getting some miles in, however. So he can update with his thoughts.

I'm looking forward to getting mine good and dirty, but I really am torn as to whether I will want to make these my long-term bffs over the ME7. The ME7 was sort of the gateway shoe for me, the one that weaned me away from carbon soles and toe-spikes, and it retains a stripped down enough fit that I equate to a "good" feel. The modern boxy shoe aesthetic, in spite of a solid year riding those 2FO Cliplites, is still a tough one for me. I am going to attempt to come to terms with this by riding a heavy coil sprung 160mm travel bike all winter, dragging my feet in corners, kicking rocks as hard as I can, and maybe wearing goggles too.

IMG_0068

Getting dragged screaming and kicking into the modern footwear era, one shoe at a time...

Pete's Thoughts on the GE9

It wasn't clear at the outset that the GE9 replaced the ME7, but the latter is (was...damnit) my favourite ever clipless shoe. So, when a set of GE9s showed up I was keen to try them but they started a couple of pitches behind in the count.

The new shoe had fallen prey to the modern, flat-soled look inspired by skate shoes. Gone was the speed lace and buckle tandem that was quick on and off and let me find that 'just so' tightness every single time. Also gone was the flap that covered the forefoot, which was so good at keeping mud and loam out of the nooks and crannies on top of the shoes.

Part of what I loved about the ME7 was that it was unique - and versatile. For years, it was the shoe I traveled with, and used for XC/Trail riding all the way to DH or shuttling (if I was clipping in). I used them on gravel. I was going to use them for BCBR but ended up in an XC race shoe instead and that was probably smart, but the ME7s would have been perfect, too.

So, when Mike offered to review them, I hesitated because I clearly had this soliloquy all bottled up. But then he more or less recited the same thing to me before I could get it out and, well, why not let Pops have a go, eh? But while his are new, I've had mine for 15 or 20 rides now, so I can muster a few comments. Most MTB shoes these days don't have a break-in period at all, but something felt better - or I just started wearing them tighter - after the first few rides. I bitched to myself about losing the buckle, but I'm a long-time BOA fan, I'd just usually prefer two BOAs to one plus a velcro strap. And the strap works well, but visually I don't love it. It snugs the foot down well, but the old buckle reached down lower and locked my ankle into place even better.

Like the ME7, the GE9's stiffness feels similar, meaning it's just right. Not racing shoe stiff, but it's still a solid platform to push off against. I've put in several 4-5 hour days in them and there is none of that end of the day relief you get after taking them off. Less foot fatigue, total comfort. Lastly, the GE9's soles follow in the ME7's...ah, the GE9's soles are also great off the bike, and I find they direct your foot to the pedal very well when you're setting off and clipping in - always important in steep terrain.

I may not love the new king yet, but it's becoming easier to be happy without the old one. Although, like Mike, I still have a fresh set of ME7s in a box in the closet, just in case.

Shimano GE9 - 299 CAD / 225 USD

Tags: GE9, Shimano, ME7
Posted in: Features, Apparel - Shoes, Gear

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Comments

velocipedestrian
+6 fartymarty Kyle Smith Skooks FlipSide Vik Banerjee Kerry Williams

I'm not sure I'll ever clip in again, after being persuaded to sharpen my technique by Ryan Leech (he was right, I was using the clip as a crutch). I do agree with lamenting the loss of the lace flap, it's amazing how clean the laces of my Freerider ELCs stay in atrocious conditions.

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pete@nsmb.com
+7 Tjaard Breeuwer Andy Eunson Velocipedestrian lewis collins Nologo Carlos Matutes Kerry Williams

I could ride exclusively flats on trails for the rest of my days and be happy, but couldn't say the same for clipless. I like to stay current in both so I can go back and forth (and also to satisfy my shoe fetish).

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cooperquinn
+1 Pete Roggeman

This.

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PKMzeta
+4 Andy Eunson lewis collins Pete Roggeman Nologo

Same here. Current setup is flats on the full-suspension enduro bike and clipless on the hardtail. Been working great for the intended purpose of each bike and keeping both skill sets sharp.

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pete@nsmb.com
+3 BarryW Velocipedestrian bighonzo

I don't own a hardtail right now but when I had my Chromag, I started out with flats. It just felt right. But as I got more comfortable on it again, riding clipless let me carry more speed in rough stuff. I was torn, though, because flats on a steel hardtail took me back to my earliest days of riding and I was encouraged to ride skinnies and goof around more. Both felt right.

On almost every other bike, either one or the other makes a little more sense, but on a hardtail, both made sense. Someone make a proverb out of that.

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fartymarty
+1 Pete Roggeman

I've been on flats on my HT for the last year and it's really helped to get my feet in the right place, improve skills in particular climbing.  It felt awkward at first but I'm now very used to it to the point where I don't want to change back.

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mmayo
+1 Pete Roggeman

In the journey of riding, adapt your stride; flats for the fun, clipless for the ride. On a hardtail, both paths coincide.

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clipless
+4 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major Velocipedestrian Thermal

Oh man, when tried flats it exposed the ugly truths about my riding habits. You can debate hardtail vs full sus for a new rider until you're blue in the face, but I will die on the hill that says everyone should start with flats.

I don't see myself switching back to clipless on my trail bike, but I've been tempted on my singlespeed, and I still clip in on my gravel bike (which now has a more foot-forward cleat position thanks to my time mountain biking on flats).

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Joe_Dick
0

true, I am flats on my commuter / gravel bike for convenience. there are urban enough trails here to expose my terrible riding habits. temped to run flats on the mountain bike this fall. expecting many crashes.

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pete@nsmb.com
0

I always think it's a good idea to try flats on the MTB but almost never try to talk people into trying clipless. Clipless finds you if you are inclined (old school or a racer) whereas flats make sense as a default for beginners or anyone curious, or who ant to work on technique, or in winter, steeps, jumping, bad mud, etc.

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DaveSmith
+1 Pete Roggeman

My 2fo's have only lasted 3 months of continuous riding so I'm curious to try this new gen of Shimano boots. I'm personally happy to see the mud flap gone after years of resorting to duct tape to keep those things closed after the velco lost its grip. 

After more than a decade of flats, I moved to clips during the pandemic and the glory days of the closed Mt Seymour road. I'm riding more confidently than I have in years since I've had strength limited from years of smashing it into rocks and nerve damage and I like the feel of being connected to the bike in at least 3 contact points.

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PKMzeta
+1 Pete Roggeman

100% agree here. I've known a few g/roadies who try to start MTB from day 1 with clipless and all of them have gone to flats to learn the ropes.

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andy-eunson
+2 Pete Roggeman BarryW

My very first ride on a mountain bike in 1983 was on Suntour bear paw pedals, Nike Lava Dome shoes and what the shop convinced me was correct, mini clips. Basically a toe clip with no strap and the strap loop cut off. Came off and landed on the top tube on my first ride and was on clips and straps until Shimano came out with clipless in 1990/91? But recently I’ve used flats because I think it’s fun to try new things and I think it’s good for my technique. But I do spend most of my rides clipped in.

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pete@nsmb.com
+2 BarryW Andy Eunson

I remember those but never had them. I did, however, use clips and straps for years and I don't know how I lived. Moved over to clipless with the first Shimano 747s and the grey shoes - two velcro straps - in 1991 or 92. That first ride was weird but after that I was hooked.

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BarryW
-1 dhr999

As a 13 year old I bought discounted road shoes (Avids I think) and mounted up clips, cages and straps on the old Raleigh 10 speed I got used when my grandfather didn't ride it anymore. And if course I put them on my fully rigid Huffy mtb. 

A year later I had saved up and bought 'Look Carbon' clips (likely always the highest dollar bike purchase when you consider my total life earnings up to that point). Putting them on my mtb? What an improvement!

Put them on my BMX and even built up a tiny pump track and would spend hours pumping around. Good memories!

Funny thing is I still think those old shoes and pedals in perfect working order, are in a box in my basement.

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BarryW
+3 Andy Eunson Niels van Kampenhout taprider olaa dhr999

It's an interesting thought that using clips to their full potential is considered poor technique. 

As in, comments like this. Is it bad form to pull up on your pedals in some instances? It seems all answers I've heard trend towards the thought that you can't replicate the move if you switched to flats. But never continue why that's a need. Why not just develop clip technique?

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taprider
+1 Kerry Williams

Nicolas Vouilloz would initiate a wheel lift/jump with flat pedal technique then reposition the bike in mid air with the clips to land in roots and rocks exactly where he wanted

When I do climbs more than an hour long, flat pedals make my hips hurt.  When I pedal more energetically on rough ground or try to put more power down, I have to change from my normal clipped in pedalling technique to keep my feet from lifting off and losing the pedals on the back stroke.  But I keep my clip-ins on a lower spring tension so I can get out quicker, which also keeps me from "cheating" with initiating a rear wheel lift.

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tim-lane
+4 Carlos Matutes Pete Roggeman Mike Ferrentino Velocipedestrian

Regarding "Flinstone-footed"ness: I learned recently that pointy shoes became fashionable because they help horse riders get in their stirrups - so wearing pointy shoes implied being wealthy enough to own a horse (high heels similarly help keep riders clipped-in on their stirrups).

I believe cycling shoes probably evolved to look pointy for the same reason - to allow riders with toe-cage pedals to easily clip-in before tightening their Binda straps (remember the old nail-in cleats with slots - they performed a similar function to the high heels for horse riders).

Since we're no longer using toe-cages, foot shaped footwear makes sooooo much more sense. The last pair of Shimano shoes which accomodated my filppers were AM-701. I tried some of these GE9's at Outerbike this weekend, and I'm encouraged enough that I'm going to pick up a set - I'm a real fuss pot for shoe fit.

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pete@nsmb.com
+2 Tim (aka DigitBikes/DirtBaggies) Velocipedestrian

Love that piece of shoe trivia. Makes perfect sense. Pointy toes persist in the dress shoe world...

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Joe_Dick
+3 Mark Bryce Borlick taprider

This review reminded me that the Boa cord on my brand new Leatt shoes are shedding their coating. Sure it was easy enough to order a replacement for $35 plus taxes and shipping of their web site, I remain Boa sceptical. 

I bought these shoes when out of town and I noticed  the sole of my Giros were cracked in half. My choice was Specialized or Leatt, both with Boas systems. The Leatt’s fit better in the store. Between the two brands this particular store carries there was no choice for anything but a Boa system.  Long live the ratchet system, but I fear it’s dead.

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pete@nsmb.com
+3 Chris Jotegir ARyman

BOA has an extremely robust warranty program. I don't know if you contacted them before ordering a replacement but every time I've heard of someone getting in touch, they're happy to send out free replacement parts.

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Joe_Dick
+3 Bryce Borlick taprider Velocipedestrian NealWood Kerry Williams ClydeRide thaaad

Robust warranty does not inspire confidence. It more indicates known and systematic issues with a product.

My very limited experience with Boa systems involves repla parts.

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pete@nsmb.com
+3 GB ClydeRide Hardlylikely

Understand that, however we don't complain about broken laces, or expect them (or worn out velcro) to be replaced so let's keep the playing ground level. Would you rather they didn't stand behind their product? Obviously not, but in my experience, companies with good warranty are companies that belive in their product. If their failure rates were too high, they'd have trouble keeping not only end consumers but their actual customers - shoe brands - happy. More brands use BOA than ever, which I think indicates the product is working. 

I've never had a failure and my first BOA shoes came to me in 06. But whether a dial breaks or a cable delaminates (I'd never heard of that until you mentioned it) they will replace it.

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skooks
+4 Vik Banerjee Velocipedestrian NealWood Andrew Major

Hard to beat the simplicity, reliability, and versatility of shoe laces.   No need for anything more complicated.

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velocipedestrian
+1 Kerry Williams

I've re-laced a shoe mid riding trip, while waiting for the shuttle. Had a spare in my bag. KISS.

Joe_Dick
+1 Kerry Williams

you are not really comparing apples to apples here. I can replace shoe laces for a few dollars found in many stores, or out of the junk drawer in my garage. Velcro if not ideal for micro adjustments but ratchets have been pretty bomb proof on many cycling shoes for close to 30 years.

I do agree that the boa system is comfortable, especially with my weird feet. But I have a very low tolerance for failure with gear.

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Jotegir
0

Would you prefer a company not stand by their product? Maybe it means they're so confident in their product they can spend their time making sure their systems work rather than running around putting out fires. 

Compared to other brands I dealt with at the shop (and I was often the go-to for submitting warranty work) Trek was by far the best for fewest per capita warranty issues with their frames. They also had the least painless internal warranty systems and the most generous replacement policies. I've dealt with other brands that had shit breaking left and right and it was like pulling teeth to get anything done.

Oh no, my part broke under warranty and the company doesn't give a fuck about it. Now that's a good product!

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ClydeRide
+2 Jotegir ohio

Well.  Hmmmm.  Saying that a robust warranty is evidence of a poor product is an interesting take.

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DaveSmith
+3 Adrian Bostock Andy Eunson Pete Roggeman

I've replaced 3 Boas in 3 months on a single pair of shoes so I can confirm that customer service is top notch. Even with the durability issues I prefer the fit and feel...I just won't get a pair of ski boots with this system

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PKMzeta
+1 Adrian Bostock

Is it the ATOP system that Leatt uses in their shoes? Had the same thing happen to my Leatt 6.0s within 2 weeks of use. They sent a replacement set under warranty.

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taprider
0

with the exception of velcro (which does not have great retention), I find ratchets the easiest to get out of when my hands are frozen and numb 

and BOA are the worst

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andy-eunson
0

The best warranty is the one you never need to use. Next best is the one where you get the replacement quickly. My experience with boa shoes has been good. Once you learn not to crank them and cut off the circulation to your feet they have been good. I have a parts bin full of mismatched single buckets though. Where I bought a replacement pair when I had one buckle get smashed. Some laces get hard to untie when they get wet. Other laces might be waterproof but slippery and need a double knot to stay done up. Makes for exiting times when you’re at the back door and have to pee like a race horse but your shoes are muddy and you can’t untie them quickly. Or the buckle is jammed with mud or something. I’ve had all these things happen. My ME7 shoes have been good in that regard.

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Sylvan
+2 Bryce Borlick Pete Roggeman

Good looking out. Just grabbed backup ME7s on clearance for when my 5 y/o pair dies. They don’t smell good, and prefer a thicker sock than when new, but otherwise going strong as a do all 4-season park and trail shoe.

Sweet Pete’s still has a few sizes left for those looking; thanks for saving me some money.

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fartymarty
+1 Vik Banerjee

This looks like a good replacement for my Shoe Gooed AM7s I use for gravel / commuting.  For riding on dirt i'm all in on flats and not looking to swap back.

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pbass
+1 Pete Roggeman

My me7s are the only thing stopping me taking off the last set of clipless pedals from my bikes. 

Starting riding flats earlier this summer after decades on clipless.

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BryceB
+1 Pete Roggeman

I just grabbed a pair of me7s for half off. Obsession still has 41 and 42 in stock. Didn’t know they were so highly regarded.

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pete@nsmb.com
0

Yeah, there are a lot of people out there that really love them. I'm still a bit stunned they discontinued them.

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Rightdudehere
+1 Mike Ferrentino

This shoe replaces the AM9, not the GR9. The GR9 is the flat pedal shoe.

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mikeferrentino
+3 Pete Roggeman Hbar Merwinn

Shit. my bad. Will fix...

As I was writing this, I was referencing the AM9. But Pete had already loaded up the photos and a placeholder title and subhead, and he mentioned the GR9. And since I generally contend that Pete has a better memory and eye for detail than I do, I thought, "hmmm, if Pete says it's the GR9, then it must be the GR9, without myself bothering to even check what the GR9 was. I just assumed it was some shoe that had replaced the AM9 and was itself now being replaced by the GE9.

TL/DR: It's all Pete's fault.

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pete@nsmb.com
+1 Mike Ferrentino

I'll take 75% of the blame. It's Mike'e article, though, so he gets 25% for not doing enough (any) fact-checking. However, of my 75%, I'm also handing 25% to Shimano for their product naming convention. I have to admit, their shoes are easier to figure out than a lot of other things (higher numbers mean more features/higher price, letters generally indicate intended use if not flat vs clipless) but it's still not great. 

Sadly, it's still better than almost every other brand. Product naming in this industry is generally terrible.

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Kenny
0

I am still patiently waiting for a true replacement for the GR9.

I love those shoes and finally wore out my last pair this spring. Sad day. I should have bought more when they were discontinued.

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OLDF150
0

i bought my grey GR9's in spring of 2020 and last year bought some 5.10 Impacts on sale.  Other than the near 0 degree days, I'll grab my GR9's every time, before the 5.10's.  The comfort and lightweight, make the GR9's the go to versus the grippier 5.10's.  I'm a little scared of the day I'll have to say goodbye to the GR9's.

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Captain-Snappy
+1 Pete Roggeman

Ha! Just bought some ME7's last week (at 50% off! Winner, winner!) to replace my 5-6 YO Shimano trail shoes that are starting to fall apart. Love me some Shimano shoes... they just fit me bang on.

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Coarsebass
0

REALLY glad I snagged a replacement set of ME7s when I did... because I need every mm of that size 50. These may run big, but they top out at 48. Thanks, Shimano.

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Frorider
0

That Velcro strap is the weak link in any bike shoe…it inevitably stops staying Velcro’d after a lot of use.  This article motivated me to find another backup pair of me7’s but so far I can’t find a 46 anywhere.  Le sigh.

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pete@nsmb.com
0

I had meant to mention that limitation of velcro and forgot to include but you're bang on.

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Konda
+2 Niels van Kampenhout Pete Roggeman

I had a velcro issue with my AM9s, where the pace flap wouldn't stay shut. The solution was simple enough, I stitched some new "fluffy" side to the cover and now it works as new again.

Mud/water doesn't do the fluffy side of the velcro any favours, and the "loops" can't be torn open indefinitely.

10mims with a needle and thread after 5~ years of use wasn't unreasonable imo.

A lot of hate in velcro in this article, but it can be repaired too.

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niels@nsmb.com
+2 NealWood Merwinn

Have repaired tired velcro on shoes successfully as well. Cut off 2/3rds of the fluffy strip and sewn new strip on to the remaining part.

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andy-eunson
0

My only complaint with the ME7 is that I’m between sizes. I wear the 40 buts it’s a touch too big. Fine with thick socks in cold weather though. The 39 I tried was a bit too small. This "new" sizing might be good. I think I can eak out another season though. Pretty sure when those are done this new Shimano shoe will be in my shoe rack.

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pete@nsmb.com
+1 shenzhe

Maybe a slightly higher volume insole would help with that?

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andy-eunson
0

Possibly. But it’s the width too. Interestingly I have sanded the insoles thinner in the toe area of my right foot on my size 39 XC702 shoes. The left is perfect with summer weight socks but the right was a bit painful. I took about a mm off the bottom of the insole on the outer roe side and it’s great now. So yeah, insoles can make a large difference. At the moment I may put my flats back on though just to change things up and keep it interesting until I land on the top tube and damage the dirty dangles with some bad technique.

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pete@nsmb.com
0

It's a lesser known fact that most people's feet are different by at least a half size. If it's more than that, it makes buying shoes a major hassle.

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niels@nsmb.com
+1 Pete Roggeman

Originally the ME7 came in half sizes, my first pair were 44.5s. Later Shimano started offering a wide version, my current pair is 44-Wide, which I think is the same as 44.5 but I’m not sure.

GE9 having wider toe box and narrower heel sounds like a 44 may fit me.

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Tjaardbreeuwer
0

You say the new shoe is wider. Is that outside/sole, or is it a wider fit as well?

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mikeferrentino
0

As far as my feet are concerned, both. The outsole is solidly a centimeter wider all the way from heel to toe, and the fit, to me, feels a little more roomy than the ME7. It does not feel "a centimeter looser", but it definitely feels like there is some more breathing room in the front half than on the ME7. But it also feels like it cups the heel maybe a little better than the ME7. I need to get some proper miles before I can really reference that, though.

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Roxtar
0

I've been wearing the ME7 in it's various iterations (yes, even the ones where the rubber sole would peel off the hard plastic inner sole) since a Shimano rep told me I had to try them. No bike shoe has ever fit me this perfect and the whole Shimano shoe / Shimano pedal interface thing is real. It's like little angel hands guiding the cleat into the pedal.

The demise of this shoe took me by painful surprise but I did manage  to squirrel away a pair of closeout Olive Green ones. (I do miss the electric blue). At least I won't have to move to skateboard styling for quite a while.

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Bli33ard
-3 Bryce Borlick BadNudes TerryP

Oh yeah? Well I'm gonna tell you what I think... First, too wordy, these are shoes, Anyway, I use Shimano shoes so I'm halfway there. Am I going to spend $200 on bike shoes, probably not. While I do have $800 Bruno Maglis they aren't for riding in a filthy trail and if you want to talk about SPDs being a crutch, then any shoe you wear is even less relevant to your skills as a rider. No, either way, your feet are on the pedals or they're not. Take a look at all those crash videos, and 100% of them don't have their feet on the pedals, and about 80% of the crashes are because they don't have their feet on the pedals!  I am also 100% correct.

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Roxtar
0

Hmmm, I think I agree with some of what you said.

I've been on clipless for thirty years. About ten years ago, I started DH riding/racing and tried platforms because, well, you're suppose to, right?

Terrifying.

Bike handling was iffy on a good day. Jumping was an exercise in terror. Chance of getting my feet in the right position? Lottery held better odds.

After a month or so of trying, I looked at WC racers. Most were clipless. Maybe they know something. Maybe having a solid connection between the bike and rider is a good thing.

Went back to clipless and haven't considered anything else since.

Platforms may be better if I crash. Clipless gives me a better chance of not crashing.

I also disagree with the whole "riding with platforms make me a better rider" thing. I hear that from clipless riders making the currently fashionable change to platforms.

That's like saying learning to drive a stick makes you a better driver. No. Not really. It's simply a different skill set (not a bad thing) that you will never need if you drive automatics.

Is learning the correct heal down/heal up platform foot placement a bad thing? Probably not. Does that knowledge add anything to riding clipless? No.

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