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REVIEW

The 12° Fasst Flexx Suspension Handlebar

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Jun 15, 2020
Reading time

Suspension In Degrees

Oh, the bikes this Fasst Flexx bar has seen. Full suspension bikes and hardtails. Budget suspension, Gucci forks, and rigid forks. Multi-speed sit & spin. Single-speed stand & grind. Skinny tires, Plus tires, DH tires, CushCore inserts, no inserts, and even tubes! Testing the novel USA-made carbon suspension bar just seemed to require a look at every different use case that came along.

This is a follow up on my first look at the Fasst Flexx Enduro bars. If you haven't already, I would suggest hitting that piece first as I'll be building on some of the ideas I discussed. For the folks that just want to keep rolling forward here's a brief rehash:

"These Fasst Flexx Enduro bars come uncut at 800mm and they're available in an 8° backsweep or the 12° backsweep I'm testing. They're made in Washington County, Utah, with 7075 aluminum linkage assembly, titanium pivot hardware, and the handles themselves are bonded in USA Made UD carbon fiber. These are not intended as a suspension replacement but rather as a complementary component that adds damping at my hands, helping take the edge off of rough tracks without changing the feel of the bike.

There's nothing really new here as Fasst Co is a Powersports company and they have been making similar products for "abuse reduction" on dirt bikes and ATVs for years. The concept is straight forward in that bars can pivot in the same load path as a suspension fork but they're aggressively stiff in the fore-aft steering plane."

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I was diligent about reapplying Loctite (blue) when swapping elastomers and have had no issues with the titanium hardware coming loose. I used a torque wrench every time.

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The folks at Fasst know their product. I tried softer rates and mixing rebound and compression rates but always ended up going back to the "hard" rate the recommended.

The Enduro bar has 5° of suspension out of the box and I cut them down to 780 from 800. I get the heebie geebies every time I cut a carbon bar but everything went fine with my Park cutting guide and a fresh hacksaw blade. I know there are better tools for the job, but cutting carbon is not a common activity in my home shop.

On that note, Fasst Flexx will have an aluminum version of the bar out by the Fall in both the 8° and 12° options. It will still be made in the USA and will knock about 100 USD off the price. They are also working on higher rise versions as it's a frequent request. No date on those yet but I'll keep bugging them as I'm planning to buy one for myself.

The current bars have 25mm of rise. On every bike, I started with my cockpit 5mm higher than with a rigid bar. With the proper spring rate, I never noticed the bar moving while I was riding but in bottom-out situations my hands would feel a bit low.

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I didn't ever notice the bar moving even on harsh bumps at weird angles or bottoming out the fork but after a long day in the saddle there is less upper body fatigue with the Fasst Flexx than without.

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The prime candidates for a 425 USD bar are folks adapting their bikes because they can't physically ride a static bar, or can't ride long enough. Plus tires, floating Rev grips, custom suspension tunes - what would it be worth to you if it's the difference between riding rugged tracks and not riding at all.

With the bars cut to 780mm it was testing time. I'm never terribly scientific but in order to discuss performance between a fair number of different platforms I stuck with the same set of grips for most of the test, and I rode every bike with them. My first couple of rides were on a well-worn pair of Ergon GE1 Slims and from then on I was on a pair of small SQLab 70X grips. Normally I would have been running push-on grips but not all the bikes had hinged controls so that wasn't an option.

Also under testing protocols, I wanted to note the difference with and without the Fasst Flexx bar so I didn't vary suspension or tire pressures when swapping between a static and suspension bar. I imagine this will be most folks' experience in the wild as well. With the proper spring rate, I never noticed the bar moving but at the end of every ride, with every setup, I noticed the bar working.

Sometimes working meant I was a bit less fatigued at the end of the day, which wasn't enough to justify the cost and complexity of the bar. Other times it made me wonder what the heck was wrong with my suspension fork and or settings. With my 180mm/150mm setup it was a fatigue reducer on long days and with less travel and less impressive suspension performance the benefits are more and more notable.

Tuneability

Whether mated to a 7" travel suspension fork or mounted to the front of my rigid bike, I settled on the same elastomer configuration. To me, it's proof that the folks at Fasst Flexx know their product as they were certain that the firm would be the best choice out of their four current options. I say current options as the colours will be changing in the future to match their moto lineup. Currently, the firm I've been running is yellow, however, in the future, the yellow coloured rubber will be a softer medium rate.

Swapping out elastomers is quick and easy although best done the night before a ride so the Loctite can cure. It's one of the few jobs that I actually got out my torque wrench for and that's definitely the best practice here. Fasst Flexx also recommends checking the bolts once in a while, which really applies to every bolt on your bike including the ones holding on your bottle cage*.

*I recently lent a total stranger my multi-tool on the trail so he could tighten the loose, and rattling, bottle cage on his 9k mountain bicycle, and he didn't even seem a little bit embarrased.

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Beer, Loctite, Pro torque wrench, and some different elastomer rates. It's a max-five minute job to do both sides but do allow the Loctite time to cure.

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This bizarre photo reminds me of a helicopter in transport. The bar is simple, unique, and really nicely made.

I was so happy with the firm elastomers I was running that I wouldn't have changed them at all if not for the sake of this article. I ended up trying one softer rate and also mixing and matching colours of compression and rebound bumpers and at the end of the day I went back to running full firm.

I bring it up because, like tires and shocks, softer isn't necessarily better for comfort or traction. With a softer rate I could feel the bar moving vertically when mashing out of the saddle, up and down, and I could also hard bottom it on occasion. One of my riding buddies who tried both setups I used suggested Fasst should offer something in the middle but I think there's enough range over four rates, and 5° of travel, that most people will have no problem picking a preferred combo.

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Colour coding will be changing to match their moto products, but currently the Yellow I was using is rated as FIRM. This was perfect for me but I still took the time to experiment a bit.

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I'd bolt everything together with a pair of hex keys and then finish the job with my torque wrench. Swapping bumpers isn't a regular occurrence but I did check the bolts as part of routine maintenance on my bike.

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I never rode the bike with a mix-matched configuration side-to-side but I did try mix-matching compression and rebound bumpers. Full firm has ended up as the only setting I used long term.

Fasst Flexx will sell you fresh elastomers if yours start to wood-up a bit and fresh hardware if you're bike parking hard and want to treat it as a wear item. Because the bar is moving rather than absorbing shock itself, it should have a lengthy lifespan without trail trauma. Even then, in my experience companies that come from a moto or BMX background tend to be more focussed on durability than gram counting.

The bar carries a 2-year warranty and a 30-Day Guarantee but aside from the ink, it's obvious the crew cares about their products and has paid attention to customer requests for more sweep, more rise, and a less expensive aluminum option.

The Use Cases

I have two very high-value use cases for the Fasst Flexx bars and both of them mesh nicely with the release of the 12° version. The first is the rider struggling with their hands, or arms, on rugged trails and sustained descents. Whether it's from working with their hands all the time, age, or any number of other factors I know quite a few riders who are in this boat.

There are a lot of things to try from fatter tires at lower pressures, to CushCore, to different grips, and even custom fork valving and I think riders who are seeking ways to keep riding, will have a positive experience with the Flexx bars. In the same vein as an SQLab Active Saddle, if the bars don't offer a massive improvement it may be hard to justify the investment. If it's the difference between cutting rides short, or quitting altogether, I think most riders will find the 425 USD.

The second, though not the general purview of NSMB, is gravel riders who are considering adding suspension and prefer a flat bar setup. For what you're going to spend on a 40mm travel suspension fork, like the Fox AX, not to mention routine maintenance, the Fasst bar is a no brainer. It won't mess with your dialed fender setup and once your handlebar bags are all strapped on no one will even know it's there but on long rides on a rigid fork, it dampens terrain even when paired with 2.8" rubber. It's also a no brainer for the rigid-forked mountain biker looking for an extra bit of low-maintenance comfort.

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With a top-end long-travel fork like the Mezzer, the Fasst bar will be an investment left to folks with bad hands.

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With the more basic Fox Performance fork on the Siskiu, the suspension bar was a much more obvious upgrade. Maybe an arguable upgrade v. a new damper or spring upgrade.

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With the rigid fork on my Walt V2 the Flexx bar made a wonderful dance partner for my 2.8" rubber and CushCore inserts.

For many riders, 425 USD could be put towards more immediately noticeable improvements like brakes, suspension service, fresh rubber, or good tire inserts. I'm not suggesting you wouldn't notice some benefit from the Fasst Flexx bar, but the investment in cash weight, and complexity may not present a great value. I loved it for my rigid bike and appreciated it everywhere else but not to the extent, at this point in my riding, that I would invest the cash. This is especially true on a high-performance full suspension bike.

If you're looking at your hands, wrists, forearms, elbows, or etc right now and wondering if this bar could be a difference-maker in managing old injuries or repetitive strain issues then I will be very surprised if you regret the investment in weight (440 grams), price (425 USD), or time (checking the bolts once in a while). There's a bunch of information at Fasst Flexx and of course, I'm happy to answer any questions in the comments.

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Comments

hongeorge
0
hongeorge  - June 15, 2020, 5:04 a.m.

It would be quite cool if they hinged down for putting the bike into a bike bag. But I'm glad they don't, they're scary enough as it is.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 7:04 a.m.

I don’t see what’s scary about them? It’s two more bolts to check when you do your routine checks. 

Other than that they’re really nicely made and the hardware is plenty beefy. 

Can always loosen stem bolts to rotate the bar. I don’t know anyone who flies with an MTB that often than packability is part of their purchasing decisions.

Reply

Harris
+4 grambo Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas Andrew Major
Harris  - June 15, 2020, 5:18 a.m.

I can vouch for these as well. I'm only 30, but a lifetime of working with my hands has me in a situation where I have been experimenting with everything possible for a couple of years to try to get rid of an arthritic feeling in my fingers while riding anything chattery or with repetitive bumps. Basically all of the good stuff. I've changed damper settings, played with volume spacers, tire pressure, inserts, cushy push on grips, brake position, and none of it did enough. I figured with the 30 day money back guarantee, what did I have to lose. One ride was all it took. I've gone from having to stop every couple of minutes on a downhill trail to being able to ride 40 minute descents without any pain in my hands.

My only complaint with this product is that the hardware holding the elastomers in place could be larger. When I was experimenting with different elastomers I was afraid that I would strip out the hardware, and be stuck.

Oddly enough, my hand pain was never present with my dirtbike. I suspect the difference in dynamics due to mass between rider and bike played a big part in this.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Harris Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 7:17 a.m.

This is awesome; thanks for sharing!

Regarding the hardware, mountain biking is hilarious in how we over spec hardware and all have the perception it’s necessary. I used to be the same - wouldn’t ride a stem that didn’t have four x M6 bolts holding the face plate on. I never bent or otherwise damaged a ‘tiny’ M4 bolt on a Thomson seat post (under lots of load) but most posts are M5. I had to spend some time thinking about when I picked up my (used) cargo bike as its held together by 5x M5 Bolts and it gets ridden hard loaded with kid and supplies. Anyways, I definitely didn’t want to swap elastomers more than necessary but for me it came down to cleaning and applying Loctite.

Interesting re. Moto. They do have freesag that we don’t get on MTB so if your suspension is well sprung and well tuned the initial chatter absorption could be better? This is where I tend to prefer MTB forks with more mid-stroke support from the air spring/damper so I can run less low speed compression off the top. Food for thought!

Reply

Harris
+1 Andrew Major
Harris  - June 15, 2020, 4:22 p.m.

The idea that hardware has to be huge is pretty funny. For me the issue is that the torx bit used is really small, and I managed to twist the tip of a Park tool P handle off while breaking the hardware loose to change elastomers. 

Yeah, I'm sure the freesag helps. I'm running bib mousses now, but even with tubes it was fine. I have gotten my suspension custom valved for my weight and riding style, but it's basic WP open dampers with shim stacks, none of this complicated blowoff valve type thing that mountain bike manufacturers rely on

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AndrewMajor
+1 Harris
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 5:14 p.m.

Maybe a running change, but mine uses 4mm hex heads at both ends. I use nice tools, but that aside the tooling fit was tight. Blue Loctite usually breaks free easily without any heat needing to be applied.

I’ve ridden a suspension fork purposely built with freesag (negative travel) and it was an interesting experience. But it does ‘feel’ less efficient and go against how sag usually works on an MTB. 

On my Durolux I’ve experimented with heavier coil negative springs to get the fork to initialize easier with higher pressures. You can lose some travel ‘tis way but the performance results are cool. I actually have the most massive neg spring they made to put on and try (always experiment!)

Reply

illgobigger
+3 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major Vik Banerjee
illgobigger  - June 15, 2020, 5:48 a.m.

One 5 minute ride on my friends Flexx Bar equipped moto was all it took for me. When I returned to my own bike without flexx bars it felt like garbage. I happily gave the guys at Fasst my money and have been riding my moto fatigue free for many years. I'm happy to hear that alloy bars with a higher rise are coming. That's the only reason why I haven't bought them for my mtn bike yet.  Anyone worried about durability for MTB should see what us moto guys are putting these handlebars through. Its a non issue! Thanks Andrew for getting the word out to the mtb community about this company.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 6:58 a.m.

Cheers! Yes, it’s two more bolts to keep an eye on doing my routine checks but durability is absolutely not a concern. These are really well made.

Out of curiosity, how much rise would be ideal for you?

Reply

blaklabl
+3 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major Vik Banerjee
blaklabl  - June 15, 2020, 6:09 a.m.

Just waiting for the higher rise...and then take my money.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 6:59 a.m.

There’s a lot of that! 

Out of curiosity, how much ruse would be ideal?

Reply

blaklabl
+2 mike Andrew Major
blaklabl  - June 15, 2020, 7:09 a.m.

45mm - 50mm would be the sweet spot for me.  

Also, Andrew, did you find the center section limiting for mounting a light to night ride?  That's the only other thing that seems like it may be an issue, the clamp area isn't all that wide, certainly not wide enough to attach my light clamp to.

Reply

blaklabl
+3 mike Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
blaklabl  - June 15, 2020, 7:24 a.m.

Actually let me be even more clear - if they had a 50mm available now, carbon or aluminum, I would buy TODAY.  

I have a feeling these may help my Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in my right hand, but I can't create another issue with my back by being more hunched over.  At 50mm I could make it work.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 10:26 a.m.

50mm is definitely the new 30mm!

I’m surprised how many people I know who have been talking about a Chromag FU50 for their bike. In general Reach has grown a lot v. Stack.

Reply

DemonMike
+1 Andrew Major
mike  - June 15, 2020, 4:55 p.m.

I have ridden the tallest bar I can find forever. Narrow 50mm,s are real old school LOL.

AlanB
+1 blaklabl
AlanB  - June 15, 2020, 9:09 p.m.

Glucosamine Sulphate worked for my carpal tunnel. It's worth trying for a month.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 7:25 a.m.

Cheers!

Glad you asked re. night riding. I spend a fair amount of time on trails in the dark including on the Flexx.

I used a NR light w/ their adjustable mount and a Bontrager 1200 with a GoPro mount with the swivel arm so I could mount the light outboard and turn it to still put the beam in the center of my path.

It worked fine BUT, a stem like the PNW Range with the GoPro mount on the faceplate would be awesome in this regard.

Reply

JVP
+1 Andrew Major
JVP  - June 15, 2020, 3:12 p.m.

Can confirm, the PNW stem is a great way to mount lights, there's a good vertical range of adjustment on their GoPro tab. So clean.

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AndrewMajor
+1 JVP
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 3:20 p.m.

If my (older) NiteRider system mounted on GoPro I think I’d already own one. I have the big battery and enough Lumens and it’s great quality so until it dies I’ll be taking it into the woods.

It’s eventual replacement will be a single unit like the Light & Motion Taz and it would look so clean to combine that with the PNW!

fartymarty
+1 Andrew Major
fartymarty  - June 16, 2020, 4:01 a.m.

I use a stem top cap with a Go-Pro mount to mount my bar lights.

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blaklabl
0
blaklabl  - June 15, 2020, 5:06 p.m.

Well, due to the shitty response from them earlier today when I inquired about a higher rise bar in the future and was told to "just run a higher stem", I won't be so quick to just "get one" when/if released.  I'm sure it means nothing to anyone but me, but thought I'd share.

The downside of social media is that you can find out how disappointed people/companies will make you just as easily as you can be pleasantly surprised.

Reply

Vikb
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - June 15, 2020, 6:21 a.m.

A friend was having wear and tear issues with her body making MTBing hard to do. I suggested these bars based on your initial impressions post. She tried them. She's not one to spend time analyzing her bikes/riding, but she's retired and they were a lot of $$ so near the end of the free trial period I asked if she wanted me to take them off her bike so she could send them back. She said no and kept them. That's about as solid an endorsement as I'll get from her.

We have also looked at a FS fatbike for her like the Lenz Fatllilac or a FS plus bike like the RSD Widlcat. She may go that route, but these bars seemed like a logical step along that path. They work with her current bike [2104 SC Bronson] and can be moved over to the FS fat/plus bike should that happen.

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AndrewMajor
+2 Vik Banerjee Lu Kz
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 6:56 a.m.

Very cool; thanks for sharing!

This is my take on all this stuff (Fasst bar, Rev grips, SQLab saddles) in that it is absolutely expensive and people that don’t need it will see it that way.

But the number of folks that have messaged me about SQLab bars and different Push-On grips and Flexx bats demonstrates to me that a lot of riders, many older, are looking for solutions to discomfort they’re experiencing mountain biking.

Suddenly faced with cutting back on riding or not riding the costs of these parts seems minimal for the value in experiences they deliver.

Reply

Jotegir
+3 Luix Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
Lu Kz  - June 15, 2020, 7:28 a.m.

That's pretty much my response whenever I read a power meter review anywhere. The comments are always like "$1,500??? For what? This is 10 dollars of hardware and 25 dollars of tech in a 75 dollar crank/pedal/spindle/etc".

If you're not an athlete using them for training, someone wanting to use power for weight loss, or someone wanting to recover from an injury.... you wouldn't get it, and you're probably not the target market. If power meters, suspension handlebars, prostate-friendly saddles, etc. were needed by everyone, they'd be a heck of a lot cheaper. 

Although when it comes to the push on grips, you actually save a bunch of money by running the renthal ultra tackys these days.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Lu Kz
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 7:32 a.m.

Exactly!

I’m usually on the Sensus Swayze these days which is an even stronger bargain. I guess if I was paying labour for a shop to glue and wire them then they’d be as much as (more than?) lock-owns though.

Reply

Vikb
+1 Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - June 15, 2020, 1:01 p.m.

Ha! I am about to swap in a set of 12 deg or 16 deg [I have both in spare bar fleet!] SQ Labs bars onto my FS bike to try and make it more comfortable on longer 6hrs+ rides. I'm over 50 and still want to be rad all day. ;-)

Reply

Jotegir
+4 Tjaard Breeuwer Pete Roggeman Jerry Willows Andrew Major
Lu Kz  - June 15, 2020, 7:22 a.m.

Roll out of bed at 7:00 AM

New post on NSMB, cool.

It's about suspension handle bars.

And it's Andrew Major writing.

Knew this would be a good one. The best man for the job when it comes to janky stuff like this or blown out bikes.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+4 Tjaard Breeuwer Lu Kz Mammal Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 7:29 a.m.

Thank You?!? (!?)

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Lu Kz Andrew Major
Pete Roggeman  - June 15, 2020, 11:04 a.m.

Haha! Take it as a compliment. I wrote something similar when you asked about testing Rev grips.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Lu Kz
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 11:21 a.m.

I’m just stuck on the word “janky.” I think the Flexx bar is a great example of a smart, simple-as-possible-while-achieving-its-raison-d’etre design and quality construction. As evidenced by their popular moto line. 

When I think “janky” it’s a panicked effort to keep both wheels on the ground while Deniz laughs at my facial expression riding my rigid bike down Digger. 

Janky! Awesome for bike trails, not awesome for bike products.

Reply

shrockie
0
Shrockie  - June 15, 2020, 5:25 p.m.

Andrew, have you tried the OneUp carbon bar with the oval area that's supposed to flex similarly to these? They seem like a similar, lighter, less expensive option.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Tjaard Breeuwer Luix
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 5:40 p.m.

The power of marketing? I’ve been asked this quite a few times and I usually respond by asking if you’ve pushed down on the OneUp bars?

I accept that the OneUps have more ‘forgiveness’ than your typical 35mm carbon bars but jump on an aluminum 31.8 bar from Renthal, ProTaper, SQLab, PNW and you’d probably put them in the same category. I do at least.

The Fasst bars actually flex 5°. It’s easiest to see/feel running too soft of an elastomer but they offer legitimate suspension. Whether the amount/type of suspension is worth the investment (money, weight, complexity) comes down to the use cases as I’ve outlined.

I will add that OneUp makes solid stuff and it would be awesome to see them offering their bars in additional sweeps. I’d love to see more companies doing a 12°+ backsweep bar to compliment their standard option.

Reply

shrockie
+1 Andrew Major
Shrockie  - June 15, 2020, 8:23 p.m.

Fantastic insight, Andrew. Thanks! The intent seemed similar but I haven't ridden them yet

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 9:33 p.m.

Anytime! Thanks for reading & interacting.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Andrew Major
Andy Eunson  - June 15, 2020, 7:47 p.m.

It’s odd how mountain bike bars are pretty much all the same in terms of sweep both up and back with a few outliers of course. Whereas road bars come in deep drop, medium drop, short drop, ergo shape, non ergo traditional shapes, various widths (which of course they have to because) and often the same manufacturer makes numerous bends and shapes. Rise is less important because of spacers and riser stems which can replace bar rise to an extent but it would be nice for manufacturers to offer more bends. 

I can’t help but look at this bar and think flex stem. There’s a new version of that available now for gravel bikes.  That would be more simple and less costly. 

I think lots of people’s chronic issues can sometimes be solved through better bike fit and/or physiotherapy gym training and that sort of thing. A trainer has helped me a lot as has being retired of course. 

I wonder if the steeper seat tube angles have caused hand issues too. As your bb gets closer to being under the saddle your balance changes and you end up leaning on the bar a bit more. A higher bar helps that. A higher rise bar helped my hands not go numb.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Andy Eunson
Andrew Major  - June 15, 2020, 9:45 p.m.

There is an increasing number of options coming with increased set back just like there are higher rise options (like 50mm Chromag and 76.2mm ProTaper). PNW dipped their toes in with 10° and I think it's been well received. SQLab at 12° and 16°. Stooge Cycles has a great looking 17° backsweep aluminum bar.

That doesn't even get into all the custom steel and Ti options out there. 

Anyways, in terms of the design, Fasst has done the classic thing of re-sizing a successful Moto product for mountain bike usage. I sure - as I pointed out in referring Rev grips, SQLab saddles, etc - with the average age of mountain bikers continuing to climb more and more products designed to help people keep riding, or ride more comfortably, will pop up. 

I think it's arguable that a flex bar is easier to design well (stiff fore-aft and forgiving up-down) compared to the twisting loads a stem takes - especially with a wide mountain bike bar - but I won't be surprised if I have an opportunity to test a suspension stem in the future. 

That said, for folks that don't need the Fasst bar it looks weird, costs a lot of money, and weighs a fair amount. For folks that do need it, it's an awesome product. 

...

I think in many cases (especially hardtails) super steep STAs are as much a product of minimizing chainstay length (tire-seat tube clearance) and making LONG Reach rideable as any benefit that's actually derived from the steep STA itself (recognizing that really tall people need steeper effective STAs).

I think the clearest examples (since mountain bike positioning does tend to be fairly dynamic) come to us from gravel riding where a lot of companies seem to have jumped on the steepish STA trend. Plenty of riders out there running 35mm setback posts with their saddles slammed rearward in order to create a proper pedaling position and get the weight off their hands. 

Myself, I find my bar v. saddle height has changed dramatically as I have ridden larger and larger bikes. Once I get beyond a 470mm Reach (I'm 5'9") I can run my bar as high or even higher than my saddle and still weight the front tire perfectly. We're all digging that short-person bike fit :-).

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scoleman
+1 Andrew Major
SColeman  - June 17, 2020, 8:15 a.m.

Add Salsa to the list of companies with more backsweep.  They do 11° in carbon and aluminum.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 17, 2020, 3:53 p.m.

Thanks, I always forget about Salsa. 

I hit some decently rugged lines on the Dream Bar too.

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Deltap60
+2 Andrew Major TucsonMike
Deltap60  - June 16, 2020, 2:38 p.m.

I'm 60 years old with two bad shoulders and I am hoping to still be out riding for at least another 20 years so I'm always looking for anything that will add a little more comfort to my ride. With that in mind I decided to try the Fasst bars since they had a 30 day trial period. I tried them for three weeks and thought they were OK but not worth the money. I took them off to return them and reinstalled my SQ Labs 16 degree bars and took off on a ride. I got about 3 miles in and headed back to the house to reinstall the Fasst bars. It's the old saying, "You don't know what you've got til it's gone." Have not looked back. My shoulders are not longer sore after a ride. Highly recommend giving them a try. I have the OneUp bars with RevGrips on my hardtail and it is an improvement over the previous bars and grips, but not nearly as much as the Fasst bars so I'm planning to replace them in the near future. I tried the RevGrips on the Fasst bars, but they did not play well together for me so I have ODI F-1 grips. Great comfort.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 16, 2020, 10:18 p.m.

Thank you for sharing! That’s my experience; I notice the absence.

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pdxkid
+1 Andrew Major
pdxkid  - June 17, 2020, 5:42 a.m.

TIL about Loctite Stick! I must have some.

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AndrewMajor
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Andrew Major  - June 17, 2020, 3:51 p.m.

A Jeff Bryson recommendation that is a nice quick convenience.

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lance-h
+1 Andrew Major
lance-h  - June 18, 2020, 9:44 p.m.

Rev Grips or Flex bars with for my hardail?

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AndrewMajor
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Andrew Major  - June 18, 2020, 10:11 p.m.

Can’t answer this personally yet. I have a couple friends with really bad hands that are on the Rev grips and have very positive things to say. 

I already, generally, run push-on grips so maybe I’m halfway there? The push-onscwork way better for my hands then lock-ons? Anyways, in my current 2nd hand semi-ignorance I see the Rev grips as something potentially more beneficial for my hands where the bar is helping my wrists, arms, shoulders? 

I do have a set of the new, less expensive, version of the Rev grip coming to test and I will definitely be looking at it both v. and in conjunction with the Fasst bar.

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blaklabl
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blaklabl  - June 19, 2020, 1:26 p.m.

I just received my Rev Grips in the mail today and get them installed.  It really wasn't bad, took a little more time but if you pay attention and read the instructions it's pretty easy.  Feel good in the driveway, not really as weird as I thought they would be, so anxious to get out on the dirt and rocks this evening to see if they live up to the hype and the price tag.

I was all-in on trying these Flexx bars, but their snarky and flippant attitude when I asked about a higher rise option in the future turned me off to them.  I am hoping these Rev Grips do the trick for my carpal tunnel.

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