PRESS RELEASE

Tannus Launches New Tire Inserts For MTB

Words Tannus Tires
Date Apr 10, 2019

Most known for their airless tire technology, Tannus has officially thrown their hat into the tire insert ring. Unlike most other inserts, Tannus Armour utilizes an inner tube as part of the system, with Tannus claiming that it will offer 360º protection, and better feel. Catch all the details after the break.


Tannus, developer of airless tire technologies, has officially launched a tire insert for mountain and gravel riding, called Tannus Armour.

Tannus America CEO Dave Ballard said, “We are here to challenge the perception of what is possible in terms of protection, traction and vibration damping in mountain tires. These inserts, together with a traditional tube, make riding feel different -- even better -- than any tire setup out there.”

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Armour uses Aither 1.1 technology, a proprietary material derived from Tannus’s airless road tires, in conjunction with a traditional tube. Though using tubes may sound like a step backwards, tubes allow the Aither foam to sit directly under the tire casing, something virtually no other insert offers. It’s what gives Armour its nearly 360 degrees of flat protection and its unique planted and confident feel.

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Tire-Insert-1.jpg

Luca Commetti riding his Tannus inserts

Pros and testers are finding that they can run lower pressures than they do with tubeless without their tires rolling in corners.

Armour is priced to be accessible at $40 per insert -- about half the price of many competitors. It is available at www.tannusarmour.com.

Comments

cyclotoine
0
cyclotoine  - April 10, 2019, 9:03 a.m.

Skeptical. With all that foam right under the outer tread, one would expect a negative effect on traction and the supple feel of a tubeless tire, which is the reason other inserts are based around the rim and exert tension on the sidewall. However, at that price, it's worth a try.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+4 Dan AJ Barlas Cr4w cyclotoine
Cam McRae  - April 10, 2019, 9:38 a.m.

Coleman and Sterling from Tannus paid me a visit the other day and we installed a set - so I'll be able to let you know.

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shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - April 10, 2019, 9:43 a.m.

Weight? Sealant required?

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cyclotoine
+1 Dan
cyclotoine  - April 10, 2019, 9:50 a.m.

Looking forward to it. I presume they do not provide a tube with it? I.e. it's not included in the weight? That would make this a pretty heavy set-up when you add a tube to the mix. They are saying 320g for the 29" armor, add 120 grams for a super light tube and you are at 440g (~$30 or more per tire).  Cushcore is 260g plus valve stem and sealant, so this represents a significant weight increase over Cushcore and with the cost of the tubes... I think I just talked myself out of it.

Reply

Brigham_Rupp
0
Brigham_Rupp  - April 10, 2019, 9:45 a.m.

Me too. Looks good from a flat protection standpoint, but also looks extra heavy and I question a positive effect on ride quality. On their press release on Pinkbike, I told Tannus that I wasn’t interested in flat protection, only ride quality, and asked them to explain why I should do Tannus over Cush Core. They basically gave me a non answer. After listening to the Downtime podcast with the Cush Core inventor, I’ve ordered some Cush Core. That said, I’m open to this being awesome and fully support anyone trying to eliminate flat tires while improving ride quality.

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craw
+1 Andrew Major
Cr4w  - April 10, 2019, 10:04 a.m.

At some point can't we just add extra rim protection to the tire?

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cyclotoine
+1 Andrew Major
cyclotoine  - April 10, 2019, 10:16 a.m.

yeah, like incorporating closed cell foam into the sidewall to create damping and protect the rim? Great idea, I wonder how many tire companies are already working on it?

Reply

xy9ine
+4 Todd Hellinga AJ Barlas Cr4w IslandLife
Perry Schebel  - April 10, 2019, 10:21 a.m.

this. (though i'm not a heavy smasher, & perfectly happy with just super gravity / double down thickness sidewalls & air, so).

Reply

IslandLife
+1 Todd Hellinga
IslandLife  - April 10, 2019, 2:28 p.m.

Yep.  Heavier duty casing and no inserts > light duty casing with inserts.

Reply

craw
+1 IslandLife
Cr4w  - April 10, 2019, 2:53 p.m.

Me too. I tried adding a Huck Norris to EXO tires and didn't get much out of it. Then I committed to the DD casing and it's been smooth sailing ever since. Good support, even at slightly lower pressures (which is a big deal for 220lb me), and no rim strikes or sidewall tears. Though I suspect DD is still a bit overkill. I'm hoping EXO+ will provide the sweet spot at lower weight.

Reply

IslandLife
0
IslandLife  - April 10, 2019, 4:48 p.m.

Yep... but Maxxis needs to get their heads out of their asses when it comes to casings. They have the lighter EXO casing, which is fine for some, it is what it is. Then they have double down (DD), and DH. But instead of making DD an nice halfway between EXO and DH, they made it pretty much a DH casing. There's just not much difference between the DD and DH casings except for a tiny bit of weight. (huge 230 gram difference between EXO and DD and then only a 95 gram difference between DD and DH??)

Then EXO+ was launched. I've chatted with a few bike shops about it and though they don't have much time on it yet, they don't hold out much hope and are basically saying it's an EXO casing with a bit more puncture protection but doesn't have the support of a heavier casing... it only adds a tiny bit of weight (70 grams).

DD or EXO+ should be right at about 1170 grams.

Maxxis needs to rework either the DD or the EXO+ and make it a true middle ground between DH and EXO.

It's a big reason I switched to Schwalbe. Now using their Super Gravity casings which are a true middle ground between their light (snakeskin) casing and their DH casing. Great support and sidewall robustness at a lighter weight than Maxxis DD.

Reply

slyfink
0
slyfink  - April 11, 2019, 12:43 p.m.

650b 2.3 Aggressor DD = 1050g

650b 2.35 Hans Dampf SG = 1065g 

Not sure where you're seeing such a large weight discrepancy? My experience with Schwalbe was with knobs ripping off. That was a long time ago, but I've also not really found a compelling tread pattern from them either. Magic Mary is grippy as heck, but I wasn't happy with rolling resistance.

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doug-hamilton
0
Doug Hamilton  - April 15, 2019, 7:27 p.m.

Try some Vittorias. The Martello in particular. The G+ tread compound and extremely durable casing are rather impressive.

shoreboy
+2 chachmonkey Andrew Major
Shoreboy  - April 10, 2019, 10:23 a.m.

I guess you could do that, but tires wear out and already cost north of $100ea.  Adding extra features is just going to drive up that cost.  At least inserts are re-usable.

Reply

IslandLife
+1 T-mack
IslandLife  - April 10, 2019, 2:25 p.m.

This is what most people don't realize... inserts wear out, get cut up, break down and are generally not re-usable.  Depending on how often and how hard you ride... something more expensive like Cushcore will last a couple years.  Cheaper versions, like a huck norris, maybe a year.

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shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - April 10, 2019, 2:28 p.m.

I dont have experience using either of them, but I do understand they wear out pretty quickly as well.  I was thinking (hoping) they would last longer than a set of tires?  Maybe not.  If they dont, they make even less sense than I thought they did before.

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cyclotoine
0
cyclotoine  - April 11, 2019, 8:44 a.m.

Exactly, that's why I'd happily pay $20 more a tire for some kind of damping technology in the sidewall. All this talk of DD and DH casings... yes added support is a feature of tire inserts and yes rim and flat protection is a feature of tire inserts, but to me, the point of tire inserts is first and foremost damping. Though I am sure heavier casings are somewhat damper by virtue of it taking more energy to deform them and the added stiffness mean they return to shape more slowly.

Reply

LoamtoHome
0
Jerry Willows  - April 11, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

The main issue I had with Cushcore was taking the tire on and off. If you can't plug a hole on a trail, you are out of luck as well. Better off running thicker casing tires imo.... 

the NukeProof ARD does look interesting as something additional.

Reply

FlipFantasia
+5 Dan goose8 Perry Schebel AJ Barlas IslandLife
Todd Hellinga  - April 10, 2019, 12:32 p.m.

yeah, na....I'll just keep running DH casings and not dealing with all this extra complexity

Reply

dan
0
Dan  - April 12, 2019, 3:02 p.m.

I'll stay tuned for a long term review but color my skeptical. Relying on tubes sounds like a step backwards. Then add more mass? Meh....

Reply

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