PRO Torque Wrench
150 Word Review

Shimano PRO Torque Wrench

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Oct 23, 2017

Torque That

There are two* types of people in the world: those who over-tighten bolts and those who under-tighten bolts. The first group wrecks their sh*t and the second group wrecks themselves. 

The stem-handlebar interface is the common concern with super light stems and low contact clamps squeezing expensive plastic handlebars. But no one likes their cranks falling off, rotor bolts coming loose or breaking alloy frame hardware. Having a stem rotate on the steerer tube when dropping in sucks too. 

PRO Torque Wrench

The Shimano PRO branded Torque Wrench comes with 3mm, 4mm, 5mm and 6mm Hex keys and both T25 and T30 Torx keys. The 3-15NM adjustable torque tool uses standard 1/4" drive so that tool range is easily extendable to include the 8mm and 10mm Hex keys that are necessary for many cranks and frames. 

Wasting money on a torque wrench can happen in two ways; going too cheap or going too fancy and spending too much. Based on the experiences of the many people I know using it, the Shimano PRO nails the middle ground with a street price hovering around $100 (USD). 

It's so easy to adjust the torque setting in 0.4 NM increments that a three year old can do it and the 3-15NM range should cover anything on a bike that requires a torque rating. Pro Tip: Always reset your torque wrench to ZERO for storage, improving accuracy over the long term. 

PRO Torque Wrench

The Shimano PRO is a nice tool to use with an obvious - but not too abrupt - release when the desired torque is achieved. 

I've seen enough cracked stems, both steerer and bar clamps, and heard enough stories of bars slipping and random parts falling off that I truly believe some folks need a torque wrench. And professional mechanics should use them on customers' high-end bikes. 

At around $100 (USD) I think the Shimano PRO, available in most bicycle shops and all over the internet, is a good quality choice for either application. 

It turns out to be impossible to find this tool on Shimano's website but you can google it and find info from a bunch of resellers.

*The third group in the middle are the goldilocks 'just right' crowd. 

Comments

andy-eunson
+1
Andy Eunson  - Oct. 23, 2017, 9:40 a.m.

I never noticed how small your hands are before. Where do find gloves?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1
Andrew Major  - Oct. 23, 2017, 12:36 p.m.

Child labour... why should investment advisors* and real estate agents get to do all the income sprinkling. I bet I can save tens of dollars this year!

*’ors not ‘ers

Reply

Xorrox
+1
Brad_xyz  - Oct. 23, 2017, 10:08 a.m.

I agree with this review completely. 

After getting a fairly highly rated (but cheap) Tekton 1/4" torque wrench off Amazon, only to have it fail about 6 weeks later (2 weeks after the no hassle return), I replaced it with this Shimano Torque wrench.  It has now been almost 2 years of trouble free operation, the "clicks" are more pronounced and the torque adjustment is more precise (though I have not independently verified or compared the accuracy or repeatability other than verifying it was in the ballpark of what it should be).

Reply

thefunkymonkey
0
TheFunkyMonkey  - Oct. 23, 2017, 11:43 a.m.

Looks identical to a Pedro's Demi torque wrench. Which reminds me that I need to get mine calibrated...

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 23, 2017, 12:38 p.m.

Yes, I was very careful to call it a “Shimano PRO branded torque wrench”. Still, knowing Shimano it - under any brand name - is likely the best option in the price range. Those guys do their research and I’ve yet to own a bad Shimano tool.

Reply

Captain-Snappy
0
Merwinn  - Oct. 23, 2017, 1:20 p.m.

Capitalizing on the 'barian's future as a hand model? ;)

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1
Andrew Major  - Oct. 23, 2017, 1:43 p.m.

Just helping her build a resume for that first part time job building bikes in a shop :-).

She can use a torque wrench and ~ knows when we use grease vs. anti-seize vs. Loctite so I figure she can start earning some scratch anytime.

Reply

JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - Oct. 23, 2017, 8:28 p.m.

where do you get these calibrated? besides the torque wrench calibration store.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 23, 2017, 8:45 p.m.

There are lots of articles and videos on how to figure out your calibration ratio at home.

This one is simple.

Reply

trustywheels
+1
trustywheels  - Oct. 24, 2017, 9:40 a.m.

I rely on my tools for a living and I've had one of these in my travel box for years. It's every bit as accurate as my much much more expensive torque measuring tools from snap-on and the like. That wiki article scares me, I would never clamp the head of one of my torque wrenches in my vice. There are many calibration companies out there who charge $20-40 to calibrate a tool like this.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 24, 2017, 9:46 a.m.

I know a fair number of people who calibrate their wrenches like so but $20 is nothing if work requires an accurate torque tool.

Reply

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