2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 5
A Day on the Oso

Riding the Ibis Oso eMTB in Santa Cruz

Photos Deniz Merdano (unless noted)
Reading time

Misguided Preconceptions

We all have feelings about most everything we are made aware of, but haven't been in contact with, before that contact occurs. These feelings can be rational or irrational but often they simply operate in the background. As a species, we constantly evaluate and assess whatever we encounter as positive or negative or of no consequence, and the primitive observational tools we use, often mislead us.

What I'm getting at is, my preconceptions about the Ibis Oso were shallow and uninformed, and ultimately unhelpful and inaccurate. At first glance, based on my ideas of what a bicycle (E or otherwise) should look like, I dismissed the Oso as something of a freak. Because of this I assumed it wouldn't perform well.

I didn't articulate these views to myself, and I don't think to anyone else. They were so ingrained and primal that they existed only as a feeling. Despite this, I saw an opportunity to ride an eMTB we hadn't ridden and decided we should to seize the day.

2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 4

Your feelings about the aesthetics of the Ibis Oso may relate to your feelings for bikes like the Mountain Cycle San Andreas. I wouldn't call the bike ugly exactly, but it does project a certain heft that may be at odds with your view of a shapely and svelte mountain bike. I can tell you it looks much better in person, and quite lovely indeed from the saddle.

Cam McRae on the Large Ibis Oso

We did a fairly quick suspension set up and then Pete and Deniz and I, each on an Oso, set about climbing up the trails and side streets on Santa Cruz's west side, to the UCSC campus. The climb was comfortable and uneventful with the Bosch motors humming along smoothly and adding power progressively as needed.

We had ridden the same trails a week earlier and we were keen to revisit some of the steeper lines. Forget what you think you may know about California riding; some of the campus trails are very challenging and consequential. They may not be as technical as the North Shore but the chutes are often longer and more intimidating. And very fun indeed.

2023 ibis oso ridden in santa cruz 15

Deniz getting residentially rowdy. This hidden descent was in the midst of a Santa Cruz neighbourhood. Photo - Cam McRae

It didn't take long before we all started to feel comfortable. When we'd stop for a break one or more of us would say things like, "this bike feels pretty good" or simply, "wow!" For my part, I began to notice a duality. The bike had a really nice soft trail feel and was composed, even when breaking traction. In situations where it seemed like the rear wheel was skipping along, the bike kept a stable attitude and allowed me to brake or maneuver deftly and with subtle inputs.

When sustained impacts occurred, or after a gap or a drop, the suspension ramped up and cushioned the blows calmly. This duality carried over to getting off the ground, and the Oso was eager to loft off hits and roots large and small, landing with satisfying composure.

2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 9

At the UCSC water tanks. This riding area, known locally as the campus trails, seems to be in some sort of sanctioning limbo, but access is not restricted in any way.

The heart of the Oso is a new manifestation of the proven DW link suspension system designed by Dave Weagle. It's being referred to as Ibis' "first-ever upper-link suspension dw-link platform." What that translates to is a progressive leverage rate that, despite being incredibly sensitive off the top, ramps up to provide plenty of support and pop when needed.

There are several other things to appreciate about the Oso as well. It comes with Lupine lights pre-installed and connected to the main battery, it can handle a 190 mm fork and even a dual crown, you can over-shock the rear suspenion to bump the rear travel up to 170 mm, and there are several size specific features like dropper posts, chain stays and even wheel sizes. In short, this is quite a machine.

- Cam McRae

ibis oso component spec

A sensible component spec (200 mm rear rotors!) and lots of nice details.

Ibis Oso Details

  • 170mm front travel
  • 155mm dw-link rear travel
  • Carbon front triangle and rear swingarm
  • Available in four sizes S-XL
  • Size specific chainstays (S/M 439mm, L/XL 444mm)
  • S/M: Mixed 29/27.5 | L/XL: 29/29
  • Size specific seat tube angles (S/M/L/XL = 77/77/78/79) • Complete weight for a size large is 53 lbs / 24 kg
  • 2.5” tire clearanceComplete builds retail for 10,999 USD

Electronics

  • Bosch Smart System (motor, battery, display, controller)
  • 750 Wh battery
  • 85Nm of torque, eMTB and Tour+ modes, navigation, optional security and ABS systems
  • Small: Bosch Gen4 Motor & 625 Wh battery
2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 7

We'd been warned about this loose and steep descent but on the Oso I felt like I could charge.

Deniz Merdano on the Medium Ibis Oso

Ask an outdoors person about the general fitness and agility of black bears of the Pacific North America and you’ll hear stories of chubby, awkward looking fuzzy creatures climbing up massive trees like they are playground structures.

I had less than zero information about the Oso (bear in Spanish) when I was told I would be riding one in Santa Cruz, CA. I knew what the frame looked like and that it was unique compared to most other bikes on the market.

Showing up at IBIS headquarters on the west side of Santa Cruz, I was already impressed with the design and decor of the place. Big wide open spaces and magical use of salvaged redwood desks set the mood for the last minute demo request we sprung upon the fine folks at Ibis. Thank you Saris Mercanti for accommodating us, and everyone else who helped us out!

2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 12

I was a little worried about the interrupted seat tube, considering my penchant for droppers of more than 200 mm. I tried raising the saddle a little but the housing was stuck somewhere in the frame and time was short. I decided to just ride it a little low and everything was fine and I had lots of clearance so I think the bike would work for me.

I threaded my pedals into the size Medium Oso in Forest Service Green colour. I Immediately noticed the Bosch Performance CX motor peeking at me behind the SRAM cranks. I like Bosch E-MTB motors and seeing one promised some good times ahead.

Significantly higher than body weight pressures were recommended for the rear shock to begin with. High leverage curves were to blame for this, so up to 195 psi I went for a 32%-ish sag on the Fox Float X2. I weigh 160ish pounds. The Fox 38 was pumped upto 80-ish psi for a balanced feel and rebound set to the quicker side of medium. I like the way a faster rebound can make a heavier eMTB feel lighter. XT brakes were also a fine sight for my index fingers and off we went up the streets to the forest for a quick spin.

2023 ibis oso ridden in santa cruz 15

There was a lot going on with the electrified Ibis’ cockpit. The Bosch Kiox system is highly informative and you can extract a ton of information from it. Light, assist, gear and brake controls add up to a busy view. Everything was within reach and intuitive. There was no getting-used-to period for this user. The size medium with 460mm reach and 440 rear center felt really balanced. The majority of the climb was done at turbo as I was also tasked with towing a self assist pedaler within our group. An old inner tube, which, by the way, was almost impossible to find in the town of Santa Cruz, tied to my saddle and to the stem of the towee.

The Oso did not skip a beat going up the somewhat technical climb for our ride. There was no lift on the front wheel and the bike felt lively no matter the load or obstacle. Size small and medium Osos have mixed wheels on their chassis where the large and XL are 29ers front and rear. I like a smaller rear wheel on my e-bikes and was right at home with this setup. Tires are DD casing Assegai on the front and DD casing Dissector out back. With great timing on our side, the trails we were on had been saturated with months of relentless rain on the California Coast but were just started to dry and firm up. The conditions were of a Chocolate cake flavour. Which means maximum traction and fun. There were crowds out enjoying the perfect conditions that don’t seem to last long down south.

2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 3

"The pressures built up rapidly around sag to provide a ton of support to push off of. Jumping this thing was absolutely fantastic." - Deniz Merdano

Photo - Pete Roggeman

ADDITIONAL DETAILS

  • Stock rear travel is 155mm with 205x60mm Trunnion shock
  • Optional 170mm rear travel with 205x65mm Trunnion shock
  • Compatible with Fox DHX2 coil shock
  • Max fork travel is 190mm
  • Dual crown approved
  • Ultra trick in-frame molded cable tunnels
  • Fully integrated lighting system with internal wire routing
  • Fits a 26oz bottle with side loading cage inside front triangle (M/L/XL)
  • Fits a 22oz bottle with side loading case inside front triangle on size small
  • Post mount 200mm rear brake
  • 220 max rear rotor
  • Boost 148 Dropout Spacing
  • SRAM UDH
  • Polycarbonate downtube and motor protectors, molded rubber swing arm protectors
  • Adjustable chainguide
  • 44mm fork offset

WARRANTY

  • Seven year frame warranty, lifetime replacement on bushings
  • Two year electronics warranty through Bosch
2023 Ibis OSO ridden in Santa Cruz 10

I feel like there should be a Banshee from the 90s in this photo.

To Sum Up

The playfulness of the Oso was exhilarating on the descents. Set up with a fast rebound, the bike felt 10 pounds lighter than it actually was. Changing directions, whipping and pushing the bike to do certain shapes was intuitive. That high leverage ratio also meant that the initial part of the travel was buttery smooth and soft. The pressures built up rapidly around sag to provide a ton of support to push off of. Jumping this thing was absolutely fantastic. With similar rear travel numbers as my long term tester Canyon Spectral:ON I was really stoked to see a 170mm fork on the Oso; a proper fork for a proper good time. The nature of the bike was well suited to really steep but mostly flowy trails we were putzing around on and I imagine the Oso would do quite well on the Shore as well.

Apart from the unfortunate side effects of the interrupted seat tube, the bike surprised me in all the positive ways. Looking forward to the opportunity for a long term tester on the Shore.

- Deniz Merdano

2023 Ibis Oso

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

vincentaedwards
+2 4Runner1 Cam McRae

I wonder if we’ll see this suspension design appearing on a longer travel non-E ibis in the future…?

Beyond the looks [which are polarizing] I’m weary of the slacker actual STA and interrupted ST. 

As someone with a long inseam for my height, I find it hard to get a good saddle position with slack STA bikes… 

A few years back I moved from a Santa Cruz TB4 to a Ripmo V2 and despite similar ‘effective’ STAs, the Ripmo puts me in a much better seated position. [I had to slam the TB4 saddle all the way forward, which looks goofy… do I spy a similar approach with the Oso in the final photo?]

-

Lastly, I love the fact that you will NOT be mistaken for riding a Ripmo on this thing. 

With so many brands trying to blend the design aesthetic between their E and ‘normal’ bikes, it’s nice to see a fresh approach. There’s something cheeky and very IBIS about this design.

Reply

Andeh
+2 4Runner1 Shoreboy Duncan Wright Tadpoledancer

I feel like Ibis shot themselves in the foot repeatedly with the Oso.  I tried to seriously consider it when I was ebike shopping this winter, and in the end there were just too many negatives.  And I'm even choosing to ignore the polarizing looks/colors.

* rats nest of cables from the headlight, remote, and display, compared to other bikes with integrated display (Specialized, Rocky)

* the integrated light is underpowered compared to what you'd actually want to use (an OL is about 2,000 lumens vs. this thing's wimpy 900), so it's just dead weight.  The tail light just blinds your buddies following behind you. I asked Ibis if they're removable and they said yes, but it requires quite a bit of disassembly to detach the wires at the motor.

* the slack actual seat tube angle and limited insertion depth.  Long effective top tube plus this led me to believe I'd feel really stretched out seated, compared to a "normal" size medium.

* the limited clearance for the shock

* the price is really high for the low/mid tier components.  You know you're off mark when a Rocky has a higher spec for a lower price.

It's a shame because from the reviews I've seen, it sounds like it rides well.

Reply

hans-heim
+5 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman LDG Suns_PSD Tadpoledancer

A few things - 

  • Long press on the power selection up button turns the lights on and off. They are road legal in EU which is the reason for the beam pattern. They are really handy for commuting and getting home in the dark. For off road riding you would add a helmet light with a wide beam pattern and sufficient power.
  • Many of us remove the Kiox display and just use the Flow app which cleans up the front end.
  • The virtual seat angle is measure using the average saddle height for each size frame, so the slack  seat tube does not actually have the effect of putting you too far back over the rear wheel.

Reply

oldmanbike
-4 Velocipedestrian Vik Banerjee BarryW Joseph Crabtree Peter Leeds burnskiez XXX_er pedalhound 4Runner1 cornedbeef JVP AverageAdventurer dhr999 LDG bikedrd Tadpoledancer

When I bought a beautiful carbon Mojo HD, Hans, it was my dream bike and I thought I'd ride it forever, but the world had other plans with the quick death of 26" wheels and 2012 bike geometry.

When my wife was buying her dream bike, I cheered her on when she decided on a fancy-build Ripley.

And my 50th birthday gift to myself was a Ripmo AF.

So, for Ibis, I was the kind of customer that most other bike companies only dream they could attract. Until you guys decided to start selling ebikes. I have no doubt you'll sell a bunch of them, too. But I believe you've lost something, too.

I don't expect I'll ever buy an Ibis again. And I doubt I'm the only one. There still are mountain bike makers who choose not to sell ebikes. As long as there are, that's who's getting my money. That's who builds my dream bikes now.

Reply

hans-heim
+14 XXX_er OldManBike Cam McRae 4Runner1 Deniz Merdano Sandy James Oates Jotegir Neil Carnegie shenzhe cornedbeef AverageAdventurer Pete Roggeman bikedrd Tadpoledancer Suns_PSD Peter Leeds

@OldManBike

Sorry to hear you're upset with Ibis!  

I don't really get it, what did we lose? 

I understand not wanting to ride an ebike for yourself, but why is it polarizing? I realize you are not alone, but I don't understand it ruining a good relationship.

The same people that made the bikes you love designed and built the Oso. It was one of the hardest projects we've ever done. We're a small crew and it was a huge project for us made that much more difficult by the pandemic. 

In the same period we managed to build our factory and get handmade USA production going on the new Exie. The entire process is reimagined in order to save energy, improve finish quality and reduce impact on the environment. The whole place is self powered with solar on the roof.

If you're ever in the area, please stop by and say hi, demo some bikes, visit the factory to see carbon frames being made or just let us know what's bugging you ; )

Best

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+3 Hans Heim LDG Tadpoledancer

Thanks for taking the time to respond, Hans! We're always happy to have the people behind the bikes and components weigh in when they feel compelled.

I didn't contribute to this article, but having ridden an Oso alongside Cam and Deniz, I can echo their opinions - great job on the bike. It was also great to see part of the operation. The vibe inside the building was awesome and the team have built a fantastic facility.

Reply

pedalhound
+11 4Runner1 Deniz Merdano WasatchEnduro Offrhodes42 Cr4w Duncan Wright Neil Carnegie shenzhe LDG bikedrd trumpstinyhands

This logic confounds me. Because I do not like something you sell, I am never buying the things I love from you again?

It's like your favourite restaurant has your favourite dish, but they just put a dish on the menu that you can not stand...so you never go there, even though you don't have to buy that dish you despise so much.

I mean you do you, but I just see flawed logic here.

I don't own an ebike, but I could care less if a brand releases one, no skin off my back...I am not riding it...lol.

Reply

4Runner1
-1 Joseph Crabtree

This comment has been removed.

XXX_er
+2 Deniz Merdano 4Runner1

its like when mom would smack you and say " this is going to hurt me more than it hurts you "

Reply

stinhambo
0

That's just plain weird.

Reply

Dakappy
0

My take is that there are many differently-abled people who love to ride, people with jobs, or kids that prevent regular rides, injuries or illnesses, all of whom have needs that fall outside of the parameters of a traditional bike.  I don't understand why this is not considered by people who are opposed to ebikes and companies that manufacture them. Ebikes are not inherently bad, and the people who ride them aren't either. Maybe next time you see an ebiker on the trail, you can ask them about their experience and be empathetic to whatever motivated them to buy an ebike. Chances are they ride for the exact same reasons as every other mountain biker.

Reply

bikedrd
0

I love my Oso. I came from a Bullit, so I immediately removed the spacer in the shock to get 170 travel and put on the 190 Zeb Ultimate and WAO wheelset that I had on the old. I removed the lights and Kiox screen and it's a clean cockpit. (It's a shame that the frame does not use the new top tube mounted system controller and mini remote.) I like the suspension action and prefer the M's 160 reach to the Bulit M's 150 reach, the 730 battery to the 630, and I run a 200 dropper on this vs the 170 I had on my Bullit. Anyway, it rips. The Bosch motor is way nicer than Shimano.

Funny there is a simultaneous Wolftooth seatpost review. That's what I put on here. The thing is the vertical motion of the Wolftooth is not that much with such a slack seat angle. So vertical drop is less than 200, but it's OK as it also moves forward, which I like. Regarding the seatpost, it works well. It's not smooth feeling at that angle though. I don't think it likes to be used at such a slack seattube angle.

Reply

snowsnake
0

You’ve got a double paragraph starting with “the heart of the Oso”, fyi.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Duncan Wright

Thanks Duncan! My browser was glitching!

Reply

craw
0

This comment has been removed.

4Runner1
0

Interesting read. I demo’d an Oso and found the sizing bizarre. It seems they need a M/L.  That ETT and reach on the L is just too much for me, personally. The M felt cramped. 

Also, the build for the $ isn’t great. I realize we’re talking emtb, but there are better values out there IMHO. 

That said, I’ve warmed to the design and applaud Ibis for continuing to do their thing.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 4Runner1 gubbinalia Pete Roggeman

Interesting. Pete and I both found the large to be comfortable at 500 mm and Deniz was on the medium at 460 mm which he got along with as well. At the same time if your sweet spot is 480, that could be an issue. 

I've been told that many top level gravity racers have stepped back from riding the longest reach they can and are riding shorter-reach bikes with slightly longer stems, and I can see their point. It's nice to feel that stretched out "in-the-bike" feel while also having a little more maneuverability. 

I was recently at a camp where Fabien Barel was expressing the same sentiment about an eMTB. Fab was one of the first to advocate for going to a longer bike for stability as I recall, but to him the advantage was stability. His feeling was, if stability isn't an issue for the bike you are riding (and eMTBs are very stable) it might make sense to go down a size.

Reply

4Runner1
+1 Cam McRae

You nailed it. My emtb is 480 reach. My Ripmo is 475.

Reply

snowsnake
0

Cam, I might be missing it somewhere, but what are you, Pete, and Deniz' height/inseam/ape index?

Reply

denomerdano
+1 Duncan Wright

I am 5'9" with 31" inseam but have the wingspan of a 6'2" fella. Somewhere around 73" i believe.

So ape index 1.05

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Duncan Wright

I'm 6' with a 34" inseam and a .96 ape index. I'm mostly legs.

Normally we post this info below an article but we aren't set up to post that info for two or more of us at this point.

Reply

snowsnake
0

Awesome, thanks. Was second guessing my choice to step up to an s5 Stumpjumper evo, so that’s validating.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0

6'1" here (185 cms), short inseam of 32". I think my ape is 1.0 or 1.1 - I'd better measure that again.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0

There may also be something to be said for pro racers being better at speed than the rest of us - we appreciate all the added stability we can get, maybe they don't need it as much.

Either way, that L fit me great and I'm usually an XL, but for sure it's a big step up from the M.

Reply

Frorider
0

Most brands have their go-to suspension design, and in recent years (for some) this has collided with the need for them to design around the ebike motor.  Hence the proliferation of long chain stays (for 29er rear) or ‘normal’ CS length with mulleted rear.  And hence the industry curiosity (at least among those that think like engineers) about How In the Hell will ibis adapt DW link to an ebike—a huge challenge.  The compromise reached with the Oso appears to have worked but I’m still waiting for a reviewer to ask Ibis about this design compromise process.  It goes without saying the Oso rear end is unlikely to be used for their real mtbs.  ;).

Reply

Suns_PSD
0

I really like the OSO (geo, suspension, looks but integration could be better), just seems the market is trending towards totally discreet mid-power e-bikes and that's what I'm receiving soon.

These full power e-bikes feel much too fast to be co-mingling with pedal bikes, to me.

Reply

UFO
0

I like the fact that Ibis have gone 'way out there' with their emtb entry. Everyone else trying to design their emtb to look like their meat mtb, and dare I say the consumers who purchase said emtb because it looks more like a regular MTB, are just insecure about gaining acceptance in the market.

Reply

joseph-crabtree
-3 BarryW Peter Leeds bikedrd 4Runner1 Nick Maffei Deltap60 Jotegir cornedbeef dhr999

An e-bike on unsanctioned trails, way to go guys.

Reply

mammal
0 Sanesh Iyer dhr999

Don't ask, don't tell... By the way, we were riding here.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+6 Deniz Merdano Mammal Deltap60 shenzhe cornedbeef dhr999 Pete Roggeman Peter Leeds

I guess I should have been more clear about the status of the Campus trails, based on what I know from riding there and talking to locals for twenty years. 

Every shot from the press releases and the web site of the Oso appears to have been shot there. Entire media camps are held there. Companies shoot their videos for bike releases there. I've ridden there many times on several types of bikes over the years. And nobody says a word when YouTubers with hundreds of thousands of followers shoot there. 

Based on everything we know, we weren't playing fast and loose with a sensitive and imperilled riding area. There were dozens of riders there while we were, and lines of bike company trucks were parked along the road before and after Sea Otter because employees, athletes and media were riding Campus. (We were told that another adjacent riding area, Soquel Demonstration State Forest, was currently closed because it was too wet and we, naturally, avoided riding there. I believe eMTBs are also restricted there).

The limbo status of the trails doesn't impact access currently and we were encouraged to ride and shoot there by locals who know the situation intimately. Our actions will have no impact on the areas' status or the efforts of locals to legitimize the riding there. 

This site was founded on the principal of not exposing sensitive or hidden trails and that has been part of our ethos all along. 

We certainly aren't perfect but we don't make reckless decisions about riding and shooting and writing about trails.

Edit - a few years ago eMTBs were frowned upon at the Campus trails and when we were trying a couple of new Santa Cruz eMTBs we rode the adjacent Wilder Ranch Trails. That is no longer the case, based on what we were told.

Reply

joseph-crabtree
0

This comment has been removed.

Grizzle
+8 Andeh 4Runner1 Deniz Merdano Cam McRae shenzhe cornedbeef Pete Roggeman dhr999 bikedrd Joseph Crabtree

Those trails have been unsanctioned for at least 20yrs, as that's when I started riding them. They should probably be sanctioned, but never will be thanks to California's laws and local NIMBYism. 

Literally hundred and more likely thousands of people "poach" those "illegal" trails most weekends throughout the year. Those tanks in the photos? The West Side shop where I worked in college has printed those on shirts and water bottles for the better part of a decade, and the rotating "graffiti" on those tanks has its own Instagram following.

My point is that your judgement is perhaps premature here, as this particular riding spot finds itself in the strange position of being both illegal, and being the beating heart of a vibrant mountain bike community since the days of cantilever brakes on rigid forks. Not to mention that the quality of those trails have birthed 3 major mountain bike manufacturers whose products are known throughout the world. (Ibis, Specialized, and of course, Santa Cruz. Perhaps you've heard of them?) From 900 miles away I can confidently tell you that those were not the only ebikes on the hill that day, and they will not be the last. The riding community there is much too strong to let a few silly laws (in the land of silly laws) destroy them, and I'm very proud to have done my part by poaching those trails myself for decades when I was a local.

Reply

Jotegir
-1 cornedbeef

Unsactioned trails are the best place for emtbs! Hahaha

Reply

the-prophet
+4 pedalhound Pete Roggeman Cam McRae C_Drago

The only unsanctioned section I see is the Sewer trail drop in the neighborhood, nothing special as it's more of a commute trail to connect the Highway 1 sector to the goods in the hills.

Zane Gray = legal, Star Wars up though the dorms = legal, the tanks themselves = legal as there is a fire road right there.

Ibis and NSMB did just fine on this one. Others, mostly Specialized, have done much worse using the gray area trails up there for marketing purposes.

Reply

BarryW
-4 KawaBunghole Timer Vik Banerjee Peter Leeds OldManBike 4Runner1 ohio XXX_er Deltap60 Sandy James Oates AverageAdventurer dhr999 bikedrd pedalhound

Wish we stuck to actual bikes here, no mopeds.

Reply

4Runner1
+15 tmoore Sandy James Oates Cam McRae Nick Maffei Andeh Niels van Kampenhout Duncan Wright ohio XXX_er Deltap60 psyguy [email protected] Offrhodes42 JVP AverageAdventurer bikedrd Joseph Crabtree

Why don’t you skip over the emtb articles? Nobody forcing you to partake. It’s so easy.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+4 4Runner1 Duncan Wright AverageAdventurer dhr999 Suns_PSD Peter Leeds

I understand your feelings Barry and sympathize with them, and your concern is noted. 

For better or worse this was a decision we felt was necessary for our long term survival, and eMTBs are something that many of us enjoy as an occasional alternative to riding under our own steam, just like we sometimes shuttle and ride lift-accessed trails. 

At the same time, I think you'll find that the vast majority of our content revolves around human powered bikes and that won't change. 

However, I don't see us ever covering mopeds or motorcycles, or even electric mopeds or motorcycles. Electric trials bikes though... Those look pretty cool to me.

Reply

XXX_er
+1 4Runner1 ohio Sandy James Oates Joseph Crabtree Peter Leeds

It  doesnt have a throttle so its not  a moped its pedal assist which is legal in Canada, the largest growing  and ever increasing segment of the industry so if NSMB doesn't  cover it they are out of step with industry . The styling of the OSO doesnt really do it for me, it wasn't  yet available when I got a Bullit but I would still chose Bullit over Oso.

Reply

Timer
-1 Velocipedestrian 4Runner1 bikedrd

With the current and future gens of high torque motors and high capacity batteries, they are edging ever closer to electric motorbikes. Just with two gas pedals instead of a throttle grip.

Reply

XXX_er
0

Its all on google,  class 1,2,3 E-bikes so the class 1 e-bike is suposed to be pedal assist with  max speed of 32kph,  a sensor on the back wheel limits the class 1 to 32kph  which is the OSO/ Bullit/ Levo or any of the e-bikes you buy from a legit LBS. I think the ability/ tech to make a motor with > 85nm of power is  readily available but I don't think the  current drive trains can handle more  power ?

which makes the class 1 E-bike ripe for a gear box, I could see 7 or 8 gears with belt drive

Reply

shoreboy
+1 Cam McRae

This begs the question of what about all the commuter e-bikes that are now on the roads? They definitely have throttles, so does this make them mopeds? I would argue it does as on my daily commute I see more and more of them being used as throttle only for propulsion. I would agree that current e-mtb are not mopeds.

Reply

XXX_er
+1 Shoreboy

I asked shop bro about the Rad power bikes with the throttles and he said " we don't sell those cuz they are illegal in Canada "

of course i can still order one from Amazon and it will be delivered to my door in 2 weeks so its a grey area cuz a bike with a throttle is a motor bike but I can't register it, I  can't insure it, I must wear a helmet and I must have a class 6 so the law can technically mess with the mopeders  if they want, there was an artical in the Vancover Sun where a mopedder  got charged > 600$ in tickets

I see them used to commute around town but they don't go on my local trails I think cuz its just too hard

Reply

shoreboy
+2 XXX_er cornedbeef

The shop bro said what now? Every RAD power bike has a throttle. They advertise it openly, and they are the vast majority of the e-bikes I see that aren't being pedaled. The RAD power bikes are designed to use the throttle to get you going (cuz they are heavy and poorly geared), but people just use the throttle full time instead of transitioning to pedaling after starting off. Combined with a few button clicks that allows you to increase the RAD bikes up to 40km/h, and you have yourself a fairly quick (and illegal) moped.

Jotegir
+1 XXX_er

Shop bro is correct on this one. But it's not enforced. I think it's a good shop policy to not sell them, if the winds change on this one I personally wouldn't want to get caught out. The shop I was at for close to a decade had a policy choice to not sell throttle e-bikes at all, regardless of customer demand or the fact that some were indeed legal. 

Throttles on e-bikes on their own don't make them non-compliant, its throttle plus max speed (and you can just pick your max speed on those RAD bikes via the menus) that take them out of any grey zone and into the "yeah that's illegal" zone.

oldmanbike
-4 Cam McRae BarryW Joseph Crabtree Peter Leeds XXX_er 4Runner1 WasatchEnduro [email protected] Sandy James Oates Neil Carnegie dhr999 bikedrd

I honestly don't doubt your good faith in deciding that covering ebikes was "necessary for our long term survival," but necessary why? From a readership perspective? I'd guess not not. And if instead it was fear of industry pressure through advertising dollars or review bikes, f**k them.

In any event. Necessary for your survival. Ugh.

Reply

Jotegir
+2 Deniz Merdano 4Runner1

I'd be willing to bet the ebike articles have pretty good readership, especially for 'new' traffic,  but perhaps lack some engagement from new readers because they scroll into the comments and see a handful of people in a relatively insular community (as in, spend enough time here and you recognize every one of the ~50 active commenters) be really negative each and every time.

Reply

stinhambo
+2 4Runner1 Cam McRae Sandy James Oates pedalhound Pete Roggeman BarryW Joseph Crabtree Peter Leeds

I haven't seen any moped reviews here, just pedal assist mountain bikes.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.