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REVIEWED

Riding the 38mm 2021 RockShox Zeb

Words Cam McRae
Date Jul 7, 2020
Reading time

It was a fortuitous debut because of the first trail I got tossed into. At the top there was still some snow on the ground and the first chute is the steepest – and not one I ride everytime. I tipped in and somehow felt controlled and strangely calm on the wet snow. At the fork just below we took the left line and rode a trail I'd only ridden once, in high summer when everything was dry and grippy. At the end of a late winter it was an entirely different trail. It felt like one continuous slimy rock chute. Instead of being able to choose lines we were at the mercy of the trail, reacting to where we ended up rather than being unable to control our destinies entirely. It should have been terrifying but somehow I felt at ease amidst the chaos. My DH racer buddy Mike was in front and I was able to stay with him for once, and I was having a blast. The rest of our crew did not enjoy the trail at all which I could understand. I was surprised to have enjoyed it. I felt like I was a little more relaxed than usual and able to trust where my bike was going to go. Despite not being broken in, Zeb had me sold in the first 5 minutes of descending.

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Steering precision comes in handy in many situations on the North Shore. Photo - Deniz Merdano

The timing of the appearance of the Fox 38 and the RockShox Zeb, which also features 38mm stanchions, makes you wonder if there are any secrets in the bike industry. You have to think that one of these companies started the development process first, but whoever was behind did an incredible job of catching up. Was industrial espionage involved? The interconnectedness of the riders and the industry in general? Or is it as simple as two companies with similar goals who sponsor hungry athletes all competing for the same prizes and looking for any advantage they can get and coming to simultaneous conclusions? Whatever the actual story is, it's remarkable that neither company managed to get a significant lead over the other considering how long suspension development cycles can be.

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The Zeb's stout chassis was noticeable from the first drop in. Photo - Deniz Merdano

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The way the crown integrates with the steerer tube of my Yeti looks amazing and suggests strength and rigidity. There is also a smaller crown available to fit other bikes. Photo - Deniz Merdano

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The new arch has an angular and purposeful look. It is also aligned more forward to accommodate a mudguard and to leave head tube room at full bottom out. Photo - Deniz Merdano

Spring and damper performance weren't remarkably different than the updated Lyrik, aside from the fork being a little more willing to get into the travel thanks to a larger negative chamber. The ride height was dependably tall in the travel until a big impact, like the aforementioned Lyrik, providing confidence and composure and preserving my Yeti's head angle as long as possible.

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Finally some fender mounts! Unfortunately these don't fit RRP's current fender lineup but a RockShox fender is on the way. Photo - Deniz Merdano

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RockShox tells us the Zeb has a significant 21% torsional stiffness advantage over the Lyrik. I can't verify that percentage but the added rigidity is immediately felt and entirely welcome in several situations. On rock faces with heavy compressions at the bottom, cornering, during chunky situations or tipping into something at an angle. Zeb doesn't beat you up in other situations though. The goal was to preserve some beneficial flex so the fore and aft stiffness is said to be increased by only 2% , while side rigidity is apparently up 7%.

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Everything needed in Jeff's tool roll.

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Some evenings dictate rooftop shenanigans at Wheelthing. Dissassembly was similar to the Lyrik: loosen the footnuts (and the clicker on the damper side), tap them free with a mallet, and remove the lowers.

Before releasing this article I realized this was an opportunity to look under the hood, so I took the Zeb to Wheelthing so Jeff Bryson could work his magic. And the timing was good. We have had a very soggy spring and I've been riding a lot in the age of Covid, so I was certainly somewhere close to, if not beyond, the 50 hr recommended service interval (identical to Lyrik at 50hrs for lower leg service and 200 for a complete service including damper). In that time there was a lot of irresponsible post-ride spraying going on and general mistreatment, to simulate accelerated real world conditions. The fork started to complain a little toward the end. On my last ride before servicing I reduced air pressure a little because I couldn't get the feel I'd grown used to. This was fine until I landed a drop a little front heavy and the Zeb bottomed with a loud clack. It was indeed, time for some love.

I've only managed one ride since the service but Jeff's touch has it running better than new. I jacked the pressure without losing any smoothness or small bump sensitivity, while bottom out resistance was back where I wanted it with the pressure back up.

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Thanks to Jeff for the teardown and insight!

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And to Lenny for putting up with us.

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This chart is for the 170mm 29er version of the fork that I've been riding. I weigh in at around 160 lbs. right now but I felt best with the fork a little above the recommended pressure at 64 PSI. I forgot to record my knob twisting I'm afraid but will be able to add those numbers in a couple of days.

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Tossing into a chunky section is a little less harrowing on the Zeb.

Compared to the Lyrik, the Zeb is 5mm taller in axle-to-crown and, according to my measurements, about a 180 grams heavier at 2200 grams (cut steerer, no axle). Based on the performance boost I've felt riding the Zeb, I'll happily pay both of those taxes for the riding I do close to home. I think I notice the Zeb most when it's not doing much at all. As I tip into a steep slab, particularly one with an abrupt and rutted runout, I feel pretty good about my fork taking me where I want to go rather than deflecting randomly, and that keeps me calm and allows me to commit fully to the move. My upper body stays a little more relaxed allowing fine adjustments and keeping me ready for anything hectic.

If I was kitting out an e-bike, the Zeb would be one of my first choices. It features the smooth and supportive travel of the Lyrik, aided by the additional ride height of the new internals, and stiffness and precision that can't be matched by smaller-stanchioned forks. Unfortunately I don't have any time on the 38, (Pete Roggeman's been riding that fork) to compare, but we plan to do some back to back testing later in the summer, but I can already tell you that Zeb is a winner of a fork.

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Age - 54

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 165lbs/75kg

Ape Index - 0.986

Inseam - 33"/84cm

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Fifth Horseman

Bar Width - 770mm

Preferred Reach - 475-490mm

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Comments

tehllama42
+2 Pete Roggeman Cam McRae
Tehllama42  - July 7, 2020, 9:24 a.m.

As a representative from the Clyde Club, I'm actually pretty excited this exists as an offering in 160mm range.  Hopefully some OEM take-off opportunities arise, because I'm a cheapskate who is still happy with my OEM Pikes, but also notices every drawback this design was intended to fix due to my new revised 110kg riding weight.

Reply

craw
+1 Andrew Major
Cr4w  - July 7, 2020, 10:36 a.m.

Might I suggest a Cane Creek Helm. Proper big-guy approved. All metal internals.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+3 Marc Fenigstein Lev Geof Harries Cr4w Cam McRae
Andrew Major  - July 7, 2020, 10:36 p.m.

But, it only has 35mm stanchions? Doesn't it feel like a noodle? Or do you only ride gravel? Wait... you know 165lbs doesn't make you a 'big-guy' right?

Reply

drpete61w
+1 Cam McRae
DrPete61W  - Aug. 5, 2020, 9:25 p.m.

As a 102kg rider who just finished his first ride on a 170mm Zeb, trust me when I say you want this fork.

Reply

heathen
+6 Pete Roggeman Dan Matt Lee AJ Barlas Merwinn broadney_dangerfield
Heathen  - July 7, 2020, 10:02 a.m.

Needs some retro Totem stickers.

Reply

rnayel
+1 Cam McRae
RNAYEL  - July 7, 2020, 10:16 a.m.

Cam, can you, Pete, or Andrew comment on how the Zeb stacks up against the Fox 38 and the Manitou Mezzer?

It seems like the heavy duty fork market is heating up, would be interested in seeing some comments re: performance on the >36mm stanchion club.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+3 Dan Andrew Collins broadney_dangerfield
Pete Roggeman  - July 7, 2020, 11:01 a.m.

None of us can yet, since none of us have ridden more than one of those three. As Cam mentioned, we plan to do some back to back testing later this summer, just haven't had a chance yet ;)

What I can say is that the Fox 38 feels stiffer than the 36 in similar ways to Cam's description of ZEB vs Lyrik: big holes feel a little smaller and less deflection shows up in the form of easier sledding when holding a line in rough terrain. G-outs at the bottom of steep sections are easier to manage. Also similarly, that stiffness doesn't come at the cost of comfort.

If you're looking to pull the trigger, I don't think there's a bad choice, but naturally we'll try to provide more usable info soon.

Reply

Shortyesquire
+1 Pete Roggeman
Andrew Collins  - July 7, 2020, 5:45 p.m.

Doesn't the new Durolux have 38mm stanchions as well? I smell a fork comparo to end all fork comparos.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+6 Niels Luix AJ Barlas Andy Eunson Andrew Collins broadney_dangerfield
Andrew Major  - July 7, 2020, 8:19 p.m.

I’m really struggling with this over simplistic, but apparently very successful, marketing smoke show that has folks automatically buying the idea that bigger diameter stanchions outright make for a stiffer chassis, never mind the notion that stiffer is always better. Hopefully after many edits I don’t come off as a total asshat here.

So, the Durolux is unchanged but for the air system and continues to use 36mm stanchions. But, it’s already a wicked-stiff chassis thanks to beefy AF crown and stanchions that were already rated for lithium-assisted bicycles. These new forks are just reaching its weight class because there’s a lot more involved in fork stiffness than stanchion size and the Durolux uppers have a tonne of material. I’d put it up against any single crown fork on the market in a blind test for rigidity.

Another awesome single crown chassis that’s plenty stiff and uses 36mm stanchions is the Ohlins RXF. If I was being facetious I’d bet that Fox has already had as many creaking 38 CSUs as Ohlins has had total since they released the 36mm chassis. Those Ohlins forks have had other issues though so just looking at CSUs isn’t really fair.

I’d love to see the folks at SRAM put out comparative numbers of Zeb v. other competing forks like the Mezzer, RXF, and Fox 38. Be surprised if they didn’t have them all.

Reply

Shortyesquire
+2 Andrew Major Andy Eunson
Andrew Collins  - July 8, 2020, 4:52 a.m.

The crazy thing is that with the ever increasing weight, the single crown forks are beginning to encroach on things like the MRP Bartlett. Which would also solve issues of CSUs and stiffness.

Hell Manitou could hit it out of the park and re-introduce the carbon MRD Dorado and allow travel reduction down to 160mm, and have adjustable axle to crown height and offset. Mmm dreamy.

Reply

rnayel
+1 Andrew Major
RNAYEL  - July 8, 2020, 6:38 a.m.

You can run the current dorado to 150-175 x 29, but you have to run the clamp at the top of the stanchion. The a2c isn’t bad but there isnt much room for adjustment.

I have one.

For reference

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/manitou-dorado-expert-27.5-29-boost-932060

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 7:43 a.m.

Yeah, Jerry Willows and I have been having that discussion for years on every long travel fork piece. Lots of ways to design a DC fork for more knee clearance (see Lefty crowns), they’re stiff, the don’t creak, etc. 

You can lower the Dorado. Boxxer 180mm. Hell, you can technically lower a Fox 40. DVO Onyx DC and Ohlins DC forks can also be ~ infinitely lowered easily. The options already exist.

One major barrier is cost. DC forks are way more expensive due to low production numbers. It would take a company really committing to a DC Enduro fork like Boxxer U-Turn of that past.

LoamtoHome
+1 Andrew Major
Jerry Willows  - July 8, 2020, 9:35 a.m.

Put Sam Hill and Richie Rude on 180mm DC forks and they will sell....  it just makes sense.  Stiffer and less maintenance.  I think SRAM and Fox could make a DC fork at 2300 grams.  Current Boxxer is under 2600 grams now.

Ride reports of the Bartlett isn't that good and it's $$$.  Takes a lot of work to make a Boxxer work at 180mm.  There is a guy who's making a DC Lyrik (Lyrik Lowers, Boxxer internals) to keep the 15mm axle.

Sooner or later they come...  it's just a matter of marketing time.  You can only do so much with a single crown before you start adding too much weight.  

Going from a DC to a single crown is astonishing the difference in braking and cornering control.

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - July 8, 2020, 9:49 a.m.

the mojo DC 36 conversion looks like an interesting (albeit expensive) solution: https://www.mojo.co.uk/morc-36-dc-offset-reduction-kit-1082-p.asp

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 10:02 a.m.

I think price is more a barrier than weight.

Look at Ohlins DC. Can be easily lowered down to 120mm travel if you want (in other words 160/170/180/190) is no issue and they offer multiple offsets. 

Formula DC too. Apparently lots of people in Europe running them lowered on Enduro bikes but they’re a big premium over SC. 

As Andy said, Trek has proven with KnockBlock that turning radius isn’t a issue. I don’t think anyone really cares about a couple hundred grams here. 

Racers will probably stay SC for the weight? And they get free forks. But so know plenty of people who’d go DC regardless of what Hill runs but for the price.

LoamtoHome
+1 Andrew Major
Jerry Willows  - July 8, 2020, 11 a.m.

I think if Sam rode a DC, it would be a greater acceptance/demand for it.  There is always going to be place for single crown (90% of the terrain out there).  Until RS and/or Fox comes out with it (36mm crowns),  there won't be a demand for it.  Until then, I'm riding my DH bike.  Long live the shuttle!  I did pedal it up to CBC yesterday

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 11:07 a.m.

Jerry, you're a born single speeder and I'll never let you forget it. Put a DC on the front of a Loooooooong wheelbase hardtail and #1fg your way to the top. 

Seriously though, have you checked out the Formula Nero R?

2620 grams (claimed), compression stack can be swapped for tuning with no disassembly, massively tuneable air system (a la Manitou), and easily lowered.

slimshady76
+1 Andrew Major
Luix  - July 8, 2020, 4:58 a.m.

There are several reports of 38s with creaky CSUs. Fox supposedly made the steerer internally ovalized to avoid this, but the shitton of torque those 38mm stanchions delivet to the steerer/crown interface is simply too much. 

So they made a fork to make the CSU creaking a thing of the past, yet said fork still suffers from said creaking...

As you say Andrew, there's much more than just stiffness when it comes to how a fork handles.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Luix
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 7:49 a.m.

The lowers are STIFF. Add carbon wheels, short stems, 35mm bars, and ever slacker HTA and ever stiffer frames and where’s the failure point in the system?

Increasing stanchion size doesn’t help steerer loads. 

More material in the crowns, more surface area/overlap for the steerer (higher axle to crown), better QC/QA, or potentially out of the box thinking like an insert inside the steerer tube to lock it in the crown - it’s not like the issue can’t be largely fixed if the desire is there.

The alternate take is everything pressfit will creak eventually and at some point it weighs so much, why not just go DC?

danimaniac
0
danimaniac  - July 8, 2020, 11:13 p.m.

I mean, I know it is in Germany, small company and everything. But the intend dude sells the stiffler in cooperation with lemonshocks. They claim to elminiate all creaking from the CSU for two years with this special glued in  steerer (guaranteed for half a year). Also increaesd for/aft stiffness of around 7%, adds around 50g to "normal" steerers from RS and FOX.

andy-eunson
+2 Andrew Major Timer
Andy Eunson  - July 8, 2020, 9:09 a.m.

I’ve looked at stiffness claims as marketing bull crap for a long time. I mean the forces a given rider puts on a fork don’t change. You stiffen one part up the forces will concentrate somewhere else. At my weight, 142, X percent stiffer than something that doesn’t really flex is meaningless. Plus I thought we wanted compliance these days? 

At what point does one simply go dual crown? I suppose some will want a tighter turn radius But based on my experience with a Trek and Nock Block and years ago a VPFree and Boxxer u turn its a non issue.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+2 Andrew Major Andy Eunson Cam McRae Graham Driedger
Jerry Willows  - July 8, 2020, 11:22 a.m.

I have....  I think it's over 2k US$.  Apparently their engineer is the smartest guy in the game.

Watch the Youtube video on the Fox 38 breakdown from Vorsprung.  Great insight to this fork and singlecrowns in general.    Fox screwed up in the HSC.  Probably get the Zeb when the new Range comes out.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+3 Pete Roggeman lewis collins Geof Harries
Sanesh Iyer  - July 7, 2020, 11:12 a.m.

Am I the only person happy they didn't rename it the Totem? I loved those decals as a teenager and maybe I'm overthinking it but....

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+4 Sanesh Iyer lewis collins sospeedy Geof Harries
Pete Roggeman  - July 7, 2020, 2:18 p.m.

Nah, you're not the only one. It's everyone's natural reaction since that fork was a cult favourite, but after a moment's reflection - it still takes a moment - most people seem to get it. I've had a half dozen conversations about it and that's what I've seen, anyway.

Reply

toddball
+1 Velocipedestrian
toddball  - July 7, 2020, 11:15 a.m.

I would be worried if those circles on the stanchion weren't concentric!

Reply

agleck7
0
Agleck7  - July 8, 2020, 8:49 a.m.

Cam - any more detail on how to tell if the circles = stiction? I seem to have them right after I service the lowers and associated them with good lubrication at the dust seal...

Reply

Endur-Bro
+6 Sanesh Iyer Cr4w Pete Roggeman lewis collins Harris AndrewR
Endur-Bro  - July 7, 2020, 4:45 p.m.

BOOST 15 spacing? BOOST 20 like the BOXXER or some new industry spacing “standard”? 

Forget the fork; I need an article on Jeff’s tool roll. I see much Wera and Knipex 🤤

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Harris
Pete Roggeman  - July 7, 2020, 10:10 p.m.

I'm sure that can be arranged...I know Andrew's a fan, and I sure think it's sexy.

Reply

DogVet
0
Hugo Williamson  - July 8, 2020, 12:34 a.m.

Is this not in part being led by E bike requirements?

Reply

JVP
+2 Andrew Major Timer
JVP  - July 8, 2020, 9:55 a.m.

Nope.  I've never understood how ebikes possibly put more strain on a fork than us bigger guys who like long days of tech xcdh. ebikers are 86.4% newer riders, casual riders, injured riders, out of shape riders, older riders. 

Aesthetics for ebikes - yes.

Reply

DogVet
0
Hugo Williamson  - July 8, 2020, 1:34 p.m.

Not amongst the lads ( much younger than me) that I ride with that have E bikes, they give the bikes some serious stick, which also may account for pretty much all of them being warranted within 18 months irrespective of brand!!

Reply

fartymarty
+3 Andrew Major Timer Andy Eunson
fartymarty  - July 8, 2020, 5:23 a.m.

At 180mm travel would you not just buy a Boxxer?

Reply

Vikb
+1 Pete Roggeman
Vik Banerjee  - July 8, 2020, 5:42 a.m.

I just bought a Lyrik for my hardtail and was a little worried it was too much fork, but now the Zeb has made it look puny and perfect for the hardtail. ;-)

Reply

WalrusRider
+1 Vik Banerjee
WalrusRider  - July 8, 2020, 10:05 a.m.

I'm going to be on the lookout for a lightly used Lyrik for my hardtail too! I have an MRP Ribbon on it currently and have never really been able to get it to feel the way I want it. The fork is light though, I'll give it that.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 10:51 a.m.

Hopefully not coming off as telling another adult how to spend their money, just food-for-thought, on my side project, I've written a lot of pieces this year about used bikes, because the used market has been on fire, and a lot of riders (new and established) are making very bad purchasing decisions (again - theirs to make). I just recently wrote this piece about buying a used fork.

The short version is, consider that a brand new 2021 Yari RC is ~$700 CAD (under $750 with tax) including a great chassis, good air system, good-enough damper, and a full warranty. Basically, every used single crown fork on the market is massively overpriced.

Sale Price + $200 service (closer to $100 if you're doing it yourself and already own all the tools) + $200-to-$400 for a new CSU when it starts creaking.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 10:57 a.m.

If you haven't already done the Chocoluxe upgrade (~+$40 USD) to the Ribbon it may make a big enough difference that you'll be happy with the fork. One of those cheaper-to-buy-what-you-own scenarios. 

If you also find the chassis to be a whippet then the investment in service and upgrade isn't going to do anything to resolve that.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - July 8, 2020, 1:53 p.m.

I've got a Ribbon Coil on my FS bike and like it. If you don't want to mess with the dual air spring and such it could be a simple way to get different fork feel while using most of your existing fork. I've stayed away from the Ribbon Air because I am lazy with setup. ;-)

Other thing is if you have not serviced your damper that's something worth doing. You can change the oil and bleed it at home with a couple simple MRP tools.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - July 8, 2020, 1:53 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

Shoreloamer
+1 Andy Eunson
Greg Bly  - July 8, 2020, 8:48 a.m.

A beefy long travel fork with a 15 mm axle. It's probably strong but for me 20 mm gives me more confidence. The same visual confidence I get looking at fat 38 mm stantions. The axle looks anemic in comparison. 

So now we are OK with long travel single crown forks that weigh a bit more yes?  Then it's time to bring back open bath damping. Imagine a smooth perfect running fork for six months! My 55 RC3 Ti fork weighs the same as this baby Totem.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 9:20 a.m.

The Fox & Marzocchi GRIP forks are open bath.

The beauty of a good sealed cartridge damper is quick, clean(er), and easy(ier) lower leg service with significantly less waste oil to dispose of. Certainly much more friendly to the home mechanic.

Reply

JVP
0 dave_f Andrew Major
JVP  - July 8, 2020, 10:33 a.m.

Sure, lower leg service is easier on sealed dampers. But sealed cartridge forks have a massive weak link of the rubber bladder that inevitably gets crimped, crushed, dislodged, torn or just full of air well before most people send their fork in for a damper service. And let's be real, most riders never do a damper service. Open bath and GRIP last way, way longer before the damper is effectively blown. 

Back when I was on Fox RC2 forks and did my own damper service, I never pulled them apart with the bladder in decent shape. More recent (non-GRIP) Fox forks might have been better, but they went in for so many CSU replacements that I never got to see the insides of the damper. 

My current DVO at least makes it super easy to bleed the damper, but you still need to do it annually. It's one of those things where there's no perfect solution - both cartridge and open have their service challenges.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - July 8, 2020, 10:44 a.m.

If you want to preface that with "in my experience" I'm certainly not going to tell you otherwise but in general terms the % of folks who ever need to replace a bladder on a FIT, Charger, Roughcut, Helm, DVO etc, etc, bladder damper is so minuscule as to be essentially non-existent. My proof is I've invoiced hundreds of fork services. 

You should be fully tearing down every fork (open bath or bled damper) at least yearly, so I wouldn't call having to bleed your damper annually a chore. 

Maybe an open bath wins by staying better lubricated (on the damper side) if neglected but given these forks all have ~10cc of bath oil in the air side they're still getting positively thrashed if not getting their routine lower service.

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Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - July 9, 2020, 9:05 a.m.

I like the idea of the bushings sitting in a large volume of lubricating oil. I like the idea of increasing the ramp up progression of the air spring by reducing the volume of air( add oil)  True open bath can be a hybrid coil/ air spring most were.  I don't think semi open bath with an expansion bladder has all these attributes. I believe Avalanche is still in business making precise tuned open bath dampers for almost any fork on the market. 

If I somehow manage to destroy my 55 I have a nice non creaky 180 mm travel Durolux with a visually assuring 20 mm axle to give me confidence. 

Bottom line the hell with new and improved make stuff that last.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - July 9, 2020, 10:02 a.m.

I loved my Avalanche damper. Would definitely consider putting one in a dual crown fork I was going to have a while (amortize the cost).

For a long travel SC fork (assuming weight isn’t an issue) I think there’s a good argument for buying a basic RS fork (Yari RC, maybe a new JEB R once supported) and adding the Avy damper for an investment that’s not that out of line with the Ultimate versions from either brand.

Durolux is a great chassis. It’s strange to me that Avy does a damper kit for X-Fusion but not SR Suntour.

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WalrusRider
0
WalrusRider  - July 8, 2020, 9:56 a.m.

The Zeb definitely sounds like it's going to be an excellent fork. I'm looking forward to trying one out. I know the Fox 38 is going to be commonly compared but I'm curious how it would compare to a DVO Onyx SC. I'm about 210lbs and the Onyx feels noticeably more stiff to me than a Lyrik or Fox 36 under certain conditions.

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danimaniac
+1 Cam McRae
danimaniac  - July 8, 2020, 11:44 p.m.

I'd like to see a comparison with the Onxy SC, RXF, Mezzer, ah.. whatever's in the field.

But then I'll stick to my Pike Select 150mm and stiffen it up with the Stiffler instead of slightly overforking with a massive fork and 160-170mm....

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