DSC07344-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival cover.jpg
First Impressions

Exclusive First Ride: The 2022 We Are One Arrival

Words Cam McRae
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Aug 3, 2021
Reading time

It's always exciting to ride a new bike before it's been released to the world, and even more so when the bike is the first ever released by a company. My anticipation was boosted further still because this frame was designed and built in Kamloops B.C. It's a wonder I didn't wet my shorts. This frame is a monumental achievement for a small, 4-year-old Canadian-based company, and seeing their processes in person left me marvelling at the accomplishments of Dustin Adams and his team.

DSC07400-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

I'd never seen this move before, a small launch between a couple of trees that is a little tricky for someone of my meagre skills, but I rode it blind after less than a minute of trail time on the Arrival. The geo is dialled.

If you've been listening to internet's constant murmuring, you may have assumed the new carbon frame from WeAreOne was going to emerge from the womb as a high single-pivot platform with an idler pulley. This rumour came to be because Dustin Adams was riding a Forbidden Druid during a time when it was well known the WAO bike was in development. Alas he pulled a fast one on all of us because the Arrival is a dual linkage design with a (mostly) conventional chain arrangement.

DSC07597-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

I was not on the brakes here nor was I trying to drift. The North Shore is drier and dustier than I can remember. My favourite moments on the Arrival have often involved corners.

The most important thing for me to convey here is how blown away I was after spending two days in the three WAO production facilities in Kamloops. I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised by how impressive every stage of the operation is, having four years ago seen how the work flow for building rims managed to virtually eliminate the labour required after moulds come out of the oven, aside from drilling and applying decals. This stage of production can apparently account for up to 80% of the labour for overseas built carbon products. This is one of the main reasons WAO can build carbon rims that are competitively priced and incredibly durable and high performing, right here in North America. Frame components are similarly complete once they have been baked. It's not simply the carbon for the main frame and swingarm that WAO produce, however. Aside from a handful of titanium bolts, every metal part is machined by WeAreOne.

Building a frame is a vastly more engineering and process heavy endeavour than rims or bars, and again Dustin Adams and his talented colleagues found ways to revolutionize the process to reduce weak spots, particularly those related to carbon drift,* while keeping the process efficient. After witnessing the operation firsthand, and seeing the internal structures of the finished frames, I would be very comfortable riding the WAO Arrival on the most intense terrain.

*drift, where the lay up of a carbon structure shifts or folds when air pressure is applied to the internal structure while in the oven, can severely impact the integrity of carbon frames

DSC07373-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

The aesthetic is pleasingly angular and industrial, without overplaying either. Travel is 160mm up front and 152mm in the rear. Standover is very generous.

My expectations for this frame were off on several levels, beyond the aforementioned single pivot and idler. I imagined the design would be somewhat radical, and I would have bet a day of shuttle driving it would be a purpose-built enduro missile. At first glance it's easy to think the Arrival fits that last categorization, but instead it's what Dustin Adams calls an all-mountain bike. It has the travel and geo to fit in with the EWS crowd, but this bike is designed to pedal extremely efficiently, thanks to ample anti-squat properties (I don't have numerical values to back that up but the pedalling platform is as good as I've ridden for bikes of this travel).. Dustin describes this iteration of the Arrival (more on that later) as a 50/50 bike, with equal emphasis placed on climbing and descending. In most situations this suited me just fine, but there was one sustained rowdy rock face where I felt quite undergunned. I survived but not without some serious clenching.

DSC07326-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

The goal here wasn't to revolutionize mountain biking in terms of geometry or kinematics, although those elements are executed very well. The real innovations are in terms of manufacturing and the integrity, detail and finish quality of the final product. Unfortunately I can't tell you more about that at this point but once patents are filed, all will be revealed.

The RIDE

The recommended set-up of approximately 20% sag, (13mm of shaft) for a firm platform, and to compensate for the low bottom bracket, fits in well with the 50:50 climbing:descending ratio. For most of the world this is a great configuration and the Arrival performed admirably in the vast majority of situations it was faced with. On trail sections with repeated square edged hits and deep holes in close succession, which are common on the North Shore, I would have preferred a more plush and responsive rear end, but the support and traction in most every other situation were impressive. What made the bike a little deceiving was how well the geometry aligned with many bikes of the 'enduro' ilk. The 64º head angle, 160/152mm of travel and the spacious cockpit and overall length encouraged me to attack steep moves and felt comfortable at speed, as long as things didn't get too bony.

DSC07482-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

Is this an all mountain bike? A trail bike? Maybe, but the geo is well prepared when the earth turns aggressively downward.

I have had exactly four rides on the Arrival. The first one was an effort to get some action photos on the North Shore, but there was enough time descending for me to make some good notes. The second was a smoky group ride in Kamloops with the WeAreOne team for a pair of videos we are producing. The third ended up being mostly trail maintenance on the Spanish Underpants, and finally yesterday I was able to just ride the bike without being distracted, again on the Spanish. It was my best ride I've had on the trail after I'd spent a few hours brushing it out and the bike was magic.

DSC07369-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

Stupid pose for scale. This bike fits me very well in size large with its 475mm reach. The XL, with a 500mm reach is not terribly long, however. The only item on my wish list would be a longer insertion depth to accommodate a 200mm post. With 170mm I found myself dropping the saddle for serious descents.

The trail is steep and shaley but not terribly bumpy, and the Arrival was the perfect machine. In fact it encouraged me to finally ride a line I've been eyeing up for years. I came close last year but I'd never ridden it from the top. It's a section that trials moto riders pioneered riding up and my usual line cuts in below a long uneven rock face which is followed by a steep shaley pitch where stopping isn't one of the available options. Coming into the shale (which is mostly concealed by undergrowth because I didn't brush everything out), with extra speed was a daunting prospect but the bike was remarkably composed and I found myself releasing my pointers and letting go. I was actually a little disappointed the line wasn't more terrifying after spending so much time riding by it.

DSC07659-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

While the rear travel isn't optimized for all-out downhill performance, the frame often seems to encourage bad behaviour. One of the design goals for the team was to build a frame that wasn't overly stiff or overbearing, so the ride would be forgiving and comfortable, and while the rear end tracks very well, the enduring impression is smooth and controlled. Cornering is a strength of the Arrival and I found myself tipping deeper and entering and exiting with more speed, likely thanks to both the forgiving architecture and the low bottom bracket.

DSC07406-denizmerdano-weareonecomposites-arrival.jpg

We were on a tight timeline to get these photos done, but again I was comfortable enough on the Arrival within 5 minutes to briefly get on the rear wheel (not my best skill).

SPEC

The Arrival won't be available as a frame only to start out with, simply based on availability and demand, so buying a complete is currently your only option. Bike shops that were existing WeAreOne dealers were able to order bikes in small quantities which means much of the first run has already been spoken for. Those bikes may not last long on the showroom floor so if you are interested you should probably get in touch with your LBS pronto. The other option is ordering directly from WAO.

The bike I was riding was the lower spec. model, which is quite silly, because it's mostly top of the line stuff. Obviously these bikes will only ship with WAO wheels, stems, and bars and from there you'll find Fox, and SRAM well-represented. A small and pleasant surprise was Magura brakes. It's been quite some time since I've been on Maguras and they were even better than I remembered; incredibly powerful and with excellent modulation. I had an issue with Magura's take on SRAM's Matchmaker system that allows the shifter and dropper lever to mate with the brake lever clamps. For many riders this won't be an issue but I've been converted to the higher, almost flat brake lever placement preferred by Yoann Barelli etc. and I couldn't make the FSA dropper actuator work with this alignment so I added a clamp. The FSA post was a little glitchy as well but I had very little time to fiddle with it and diagnose the problem.

GreySide.jpg

The AXS version goes a little deeper with brakes, drivetrain (but not cassette or chain), dropper, hubs, and cranks. It's also a different colour. Both builds allow you to choose the WeAreOne bar you'd like. Photo - WAO

The SRAM drivetrain performed flawlessly, and actually shifted a little more smoothly than the other XO1 bikes I've been riding lately. That's likely to do with the chainline being optimized for the gears most of us use most; the largest 8 cogs. To accomplish this improved alignment without sacrficing elsewhere, the Arrival is built with a Super Boost rear axle but only a Boost bottom bracket. Say what you will about 157 spacing but in this case it's going to preserve your drivetrain and save you cash.

Build Kits and Pricing copy.jpg

How can bikes worth 10K and 12,970 CAD be good value? When they are spec'ed like this they can. With the current market you could likely sell the build kit and have a very reasonably priced frame left over.

As part of the "500 mile diet" philosophy adopted by WeAreOne, the headset is made by Chris King (hooray!), the carbon pre-preg comes from Toray Advanced Composites in Washington State, the rubber protective elements on the frame are made by Advance Plastics in Vancouver, and the aluminum billet is supplied by Kaiser Aluminum in Spokane WA. The Industry 9 hubs aren't within the 500 mile limit, but they are produced in Asheville North Carolina. Elsewhere on the bike that goes out the window, but you'd have a hard time finding a composite frame that comes anywhere close in terms of domestically produced elements.

weareone arrival 500 mile diet.jpg

More on GEO

The number on the Arrival that is the biggest outlier is the BB height. At 338mm I couldn't find another 29er frame with similar travel that rides as low, after a quick comparison of comparable bikes. Using the suggested sag I only unexpectedly caught a pedal once using the recommended 20% sag. This also gives the bike an impressive 37mm BB drop (the distance the bottom bracket sits below the front axle), which may explain how planted the bike feels but also how well the front end pushes through bumps and obstacles.

Geo Specs.jpg

The 77º effective seat angle (71º actual) felt about right to me and I also appreciated the compact 621mm stack, which is another number on the edge, with only the Santa Cruz Hightower being comparable. You can always go up but a tall stack can cause problems for some riders in terms of reach or front end weight. The wheelbase also hit a sweet spot to me at 1246 and it sits around the middle of my chosen comparables. The chainstay length of 437 is another goldilocks number with bikes equally dispersed on either end. The M and Lg frames have one swingarm, while the XL version goes up to 441 and comes out of a different mould.

Comparables

The bikes I've ridden that come closest to the Arrival are the Transition Sentinel (albeit not the longer, slacker current version that has more travel) and the Santa Cruz Hightower. Riders in the market for a bike that climbs and pedals extremely efficiently without sacrificing much on the way down should be well served by this bike. You may want to consider something a little more downhill focussed if you spend a lot of time in the bike parks, ride exclusively DH focussed terrain or if you race challenging enduro courses, but based on my experience a competent rider will be able to enjoy any of those experiences aboard the Arrival.

vladimir one off.jpg

Dustin Adams began talking with Vladimir Yordanov when a story was published on Pinkbike about the one-off carbon frame he produced himself. Eventually Vlad moved to Kamloops and joined the WeAreOne team.

The Future

The Arrival was designed as a modular system, with the ability to change attitude and travel in either direction with a different rear shock and different links. Both a 120mm and 170mm version of this frame are already being developed and designer Vladimir Yordanov has been riding a 170mm version with a Fox 40 at both the Whistler and Sun Peaks bike parks. Even with the current model, your warranty will remain valid if you mountain dual crown fork. Don't expect to see either bike shortly though. The entire WeAreOne team has been working very long hours in order to get this project to market and the plan is to take a breath before pushing out one of these versions.

dustin-adams.jpg

Dustin Adams with a stack of failed prototypes. Photo - Hailey Elise

Arrival...

When Dustin Adams decided to branch out on his own and create WeAreOne, his goal was to produce a carbon frame within five years. This was a very lofty goal but he and his team managed to do it in four years, despite the added challenges that came with a global pandemic. While the bike is excellent on almost every level, the achievement of the design and build, all completed in Kamloops, cannot be overstated. It was incredibly inspiring to witness what they have done first hand and meet the incredible team who contributed to the final product. Watch for our video on the story of how the Arrival came to be and the entire process in the coming days, and have a look at WeAreOne's launch video and press release here...

For more hit up WeAreOne.bike

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Age - 55

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 165lbs/74.5kg

Ape Index - 0.986

Inseam - 34"/86cm

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Fifth Horseman

Bar Width - 760mm

Preferred Reach - 485-500mm (longer with 27.5 wheels than 29)

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Jotegir
+13 Cam McRae Tim Coleman Pete Roggeman Mammal Speedster Dave Smith Endur-Bro Perry Schebel AJ Barlas LWK ollyh DadStillRides DancingWithMyself
Lu Kz  - Aug. 3, 2021, 8:18 a.m.

1. Extremely impressive to make so much in house. If there's something they don't like somewhere in the pipeline, they figure out how to DIY

2. Finally, a Canadian made bike again!

3. A company that lets you do whatever the f*ck you want with your bike and they'll have your back short of driving it over with your car.

Reply

Timmigrant
+8 Pete Roggeman Mammal Vincent Edwards Dave Smith Perry Schebel Lu Kz NealWood ollyh
Tim Coleman  - Aug. 3, 2021, 8:35 a.m.

So awesome that we now have a locally produced carbon bike and wheels! Huge kudos to We Are One for the accomplishment. I love the industrial design, and attention to detail. I guess that's not a surprise for anyone that's held a set of new We Are One wheels in their hands. I can't wait to try one!

Reply

xy9ine
+6 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman Mammal Speedster Dave Smith ollyh
Perry Schebel  - Aug. 3, 2021, 8:43 a.m.

urgh, that's hot. as per above sentiments, huge congratulations for making this happen. love seeing the return of local manufacturing.

Reply

DaveSmith
+1 Pete Roggeman
Dave Smith  - Aug. 3, 2021, 8:47 a.m.

Can't wait...

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Mammal Kerry Williams
Pete Roggeman  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:09 a.m.

Oof, can't wait to throw a leg over one of these. Nice work, Dustin and WAO!

Reply

mammal
+4 Cam McRae Velocipedestrian Muesliman Kerry Williams
Mammal  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:16 a.m.

Big round of applause, WAO. I've never owned a product of theirs, but I'm continually impressed by their operation.

For a guy who's still pretty much scraping by, 10K for a bike not too dissimilar to my Ripmo AF is completely unpractical, but that bike looks absolutely amazing. Especially for a "first".

Reply

Kenny
+6 Konrad Beau Miller Velocipedestrian Muesliman DancingWithMyself Nologo
Kenny  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:20 a.m.

Huge congrats it's clear this was a major goal/milestone for Dustin and then team. 

I am curious about the choice of a 100mm head tube for a size L and only 105mm for the xl. I wonder if this is to allow for modularity with longer travel applications? 

Maybe I'm a mutant but I'd need a lot of spacers and/or handle bar rise... especially the folks shopping for 500mm reach frames surely want more stack than that?

Reply

Jotegir
+2 Muesliman Ceecee stiingya Nologo
Lu Kz  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:51 a.m.

I'm guessing its to please all crowds. With a 170mm and a 120mm or so link in the works, you gotta please the 180/200mm fork crowd by not having their bars too high, and you gotta please the 120mm crowd by allowing them to run their front ends low AF. People who like high stack heights can account for that. Going the other way on a frame with a big head tube length is another story.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 Lu Kz Muesliman
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:31 a.m.

I’d say you nailed it. Versatility seems the likely goal there.

Reply

david-max
+8 Grif Cr4w DancingWithMyself tdc_worm Velocipedestrian Nologo cyclotoine Vik Banerjee stiingya Lu Kz
David Max  - Aug. 4, 2021, 9:47 a.m.

I understand the intent, but as lovely as it is, it would keep me from buying the bike. As a tall rider with long legs, 640 mm is the minimum stack I would consider acceptable on an XL all mountain/enduro frame, and my preference would be for 650 mm to 660 mm. I could see the stack numbers they chose working on the 120 mm travel version of the frame, but not the 150 mm one.

I know that high-rise bars are a thing, but to get my bars to within a reasonable drop from my saddle is going to severely limit the choice of bars available to me, and I would still have to use a tall stack of spacers. This compromises front end stiffness and aesthetics (which does matter to me when I'm spending this much on a bike), and it eats into the effective top tube and reach. 

I think at this point, I'm just feeling somewhat annoyed by geometry decisions that penalize riders on either end of the height bell curve. The stack grows 10 mm across 3 frame sizes, while the reach grows by 50 mm. According to their geometry chart, that means they are suggesting that a rider that is 6'4 would only want their bars 10 mm higher than a 5'3 rider, and vice versa. There is something clearly off about that recommendation!

I know that not all bikes are for all people, but I feel like they failed to hit a reasonable happy medium on a key geometry number, and that is disqualifying for me. Nonetheless, I am still deeply impressed by the quality of the manufacturing and the ethic behind it, and I wish them all the luck in the world with it. I hope that future bikes from WAO will have somewhat more reasonable stack heights. It's probably a long ways off, but I would also love to see them expand their capacity enough to take on production for some other smaller BC based companies. A made in BC Forbidden would be so hot!

Reply

DancingWithMyself
+1 stiingya
MuscogeeMasher  - Aug. 4, 2021, 5:51 p.m.

Huge props to WAO for pulling this off.  Lots of really attractive things about the bike.  I probably wouldn’t buy b/c of head tube either.  Even with 35mm rise bars, I’d have a load of spacers.  BUT, I totally get why they do this the first year.  Hopefully in a few years they are producing 3 different,  dedicated frames and this issue goes away.

Reply

T-mack
+1 stiingya
T-mack  - Aug. 5, 2021, 7:48 a.m.

Yeah I'm 6'4" and hear what you're saying. I'll be getting the XL of an Arrival and probably run a 10mm spacer and 35 rise bars. With a 64 HTA, you lose about 1mm of length with a10mm spacer, but the riser bar essentially lifts you straight up. 

Its so funny looking at Steve Pete's bikes, he always had to run a ridiculous amount of spacers, looked so bad. Now with these new massive bikes (XXL Megatower) you can run a slammed stem, but omg do those huge head tubes look awful. 

I remember when i bought my Pole Evolink a few years back and thought it was MASSIVE. I checked the geo out of curiosity and it had a reach of 510, stack of 635 and I ran a 20mm BZA bar. On paper that bike should be tiny for me now considering I 'have to' add a bunch of spacers to get the stack to 650ish. I'm starting to wonder if we went a bit far with geo...

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Aug. 5, 2021, 10:42 a.m.

At 6', I'll be taking delivery of two SZ1 of Arrivals in order to perform back-to-back anecdotal comparisons of the dynamic stack of Öhlins and EXT forks screwed to 50mm rise Enve cockpits while thinking about Wade Simmons

Ceecee
+1 Lu Kz
Ceecee  - Aug. 5, 2021, 10:43 a.m.

WAO takes on production of Milhouse

Reply

cyclotoine
+1 stiingya
cyclotoine  - Aug. 5, 2021, 10:52 a.m.

I completely agree with you and was discussing the Arrival with another ~6'4" friend and we both agreed the bike was too small to consider. I know reach won't shrink a huge amount as you increase stack but a lower stack means that at a comparable stack to another XL frame the reach shrinks below 500mm. But personal preference.... I know an extremely talented 6'4" ish rider who rides large frames, he's a far better rider than I am so go figure. It's also interesting that the reviewer in this article is happy riding medium/large size of this bike at 6'. I'd figure the bike was too small at that height but it just goes to show that everyone is an individual. I have to give specialized the kudos for offerring 6 sizes in the stumpjumper evo, pretty hard to complain about that kind of choice.

Reply

stiingya
+1 Cam McRae
stiingya  - Aug. 8, 2021, 10:53 a.m.

Considering the down votes I thought I'd up vote some comments and chime in that I was also disappointed in the low stack height's especially given they aren't doing or advertising a size 4 to try and address it. (maybe someday?) Honestly the the idea that this will fit a 6'4" rider is a bit disingenuous. It would fit "a few" 6'4" riders that might prefer a shorter/lower set up? But I'd guess a lot of 6'2" riders are going to find the front end height an issue and then addressing that will shorten the effective reach and make that an issue. It will work fine for some and not at all for others.

Which "if" there were local bikes to demo wouldn't be such an issue. But from my lower half of North America perspective it seems like way too much of a size risk for taller riders?

Now to play devils advocate, I'd guess they will hit the larger part of the market with this concept and so from a $$$ standpoint it makes total sense. But like others who go with these kind of "compromised" designs to hit multiple market segments it's a double edged sword. Remember when Specialized just added headset spacers to their 29er frames to make 27.5 bikes and most everyone hated the geometry. OR how Guerilla Gravity has to have their mainframe tough enough/heavy enough to take a 180mm fork and so when someone builds a 120mm bike out of the same main frame it's always heavier than other 120mm frame bikes. (but most of the time still cheaper!) :)

Anyway. It is a solid business decision. Just a bummer from my perspective.

(Edit, fairly new to commenting here so didn't realize we started at zero. Thought that meant someone was down-voting it... :) :) :) )

cam@nsmb.com
+1 stiingya
Cam McRae  - Aug. 8, 2021, 1:17 p.m.

Replying to Stiingya. Welcome aboard first of all. Secondly I am pretty happy on bikes at 500 reach going down - especially 27s -  but I prefer a little shorter cockpit overall.  My sweet spot may be a little longer than the large's 475 here, but I am still able to feel very comfortable all around at that length. I'm mostly legs though so I don't always need to push to an XL as in this case. I also generally like a low bar height.

Depending on how things go - I wouldn't be surprised to see WAO (I prefer WR1 as an aside but internally they seem to use WAO I believe) open new moulds for a larger size. Maybe even smaller? The beauty is that they can do this all in-house and respond incredibly quickly. 

I also think that, as someone mentioned above, the goal is likely to have the frame be adaptable so that when you put on a 170mm fork and change the rear kinematics everything works well.

FranckKirscher
0
Franck Kirscher  - Aug. 18, 2021, 4:14 p.m.

Have you ridden the XL, or do you feel it would have been better for your 6' frame?

Reply

stiingya
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
stiingya  - Aug. 9, 2021, 8:21 a.m.

Just to add info. Look at PB's review of the Warden LT. They call out the short headtube requiring extra spacers for fit which makes the bike feel smaller due to reducing effective reach.

Again, it's not so much that it's "wrong". Just that it's limiting the sizing at the upper end of the sizing chart and may require some to size up. And if your already on the largest size your chit out of luck... :)

Reply

SprSonik
0 Cam McRae stiingya
Mark Forbes  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:28 a.m.

Sounds awesome, and though it is a new bike, the review sure reads a lot like some of the reviews on the Yeti SB 5.5...Sounds like a comparable but slightly updated version of a playful big bike.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Muesliman
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:27 a.m.

That’s a pretty solid comparison I’d say. Although if my memory serves the 5.5 is likely a little more descent focussed in terms of kinematics and performance despite having less rear travel.

Reply

Wapti
+1 Cam McRae
Wapti  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:41 a.m.

Time to start saving my shekels again.

Reply

Wapti
0
Wapti  - Aug. 3, 2021, 9:41 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

IslandLife
+2 Cam McRae whateverbr0
IslandLife  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:38 a.m.

Your comments about geo and that low BB - Geo is very similar to the Knolly Chilcotin in it's 151mm travel guise (in the slack setting and size large). Travel 151/160 vs 152/160,  BB - 335 vs 338, Chainstays - 438 vs 437, Stack - 628 vs 621, STA - 77.4 vs 77, HTA - 64.5 vs 64, 157 rear end vs 157 rear end.  Biggest difference is reach and then wheelbase - 492 vs 475 and 1254 vs 1246 

Very interesting bike... and huge congrats to them for putting this together!!!  Will get even more interesting once lower spec options and/or a frame-only option become available.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 IslandLife
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:49 a.m.

Excellent comparison.

Reply

whateverbr0
0
whateverbr0  - Aug. 4, 2021, 7:35 a.m.

It also sounds like it rides totally different despite catering to the same crowd. I'm thrilled for WAO and so excited for some long-term reviews.

Reply

delusional
+1 Cam McRae
delusional  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:49 a.m.

I'm not sure if it would really be considered the same travel bracket, but that BB height is 10mm higher than the 2020 Stumpy Evo. That comes with 140mm as standard, but easily goes up to 150mm with a cascade link and clipping a shock spacer to increase the stroke (arguably all needed to make the bike live up to its potential).

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:53 a.m.

Wow. That is very low indeed.

Reply

Suns_PSD
+1 DancingWithMyself
Sun Hester  - Aug. 3, 2021, 11:04 a.m.

Bike looks fantastic!

One thing that has me a bit confused is the recommended 20% rear sag.  Presuming that the suspension works well with only 20% sag, the dynamic geo must be quite a bit steeper  than say my '21 SJ Evo at 30-32% sag (where it actually works well).

Also, the ability of your rear wheel to move downwards is quite important for suspension performance and the Arrival has quite a bit less of that travel (reverse travel?) as well to assist with keeping the rear wheel in touch with the ground, particularly on steep descents.

Would like to hear more on this topic.

Reply

Suns_PSD
0
Sun Hester  - Aug. 3, 2021, 11:04 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

Gbergevin
0
Gbergevin  - Aug. 3, 2021, 11:13 a.m.

A really good looking bike with really good numbers - a 120 version sounds like the perfect replacement for my Knolly 100 years from now when it dies... or 2-3 years from now when I get the itch to burn some money.

Reply

rigidjunkie
0
Allen Lloyd  - Aug. 3, 2021, 11:25 a.m.

Bike looks rad.  Why not run King hubs?  I feel like i9 has become the "upgrade" hub that everybody uses, and I just don't get it.  I would take King hubs over i9 every day of the week.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 andyf
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 11:40 a.m.

I love King hubs but I’d say that’s an issue of both price and weight, although the new CK hubs are lighter than previous versions. Retail on a set of CK hubs is over 1000 CAD or 750 USD. Beyond that King no longer makes a super boost hub. I9 isn’t much different at retail but they have spent a lot of effort courting OE spec and WeAreOne makes I9 branded rims and uses I9 hubs for all of their wheel sets now so there is likely a solid partnership there that keeps cost in check.

Reply

4Runner1
+2 Cam McRae DancingWithMyself
4Runner1  - Aug. 3, 2021, 12:13 p.m.

Not in the market for a new ride as I’ve just taken delivery of my new Ripmo. However, I did build it with WAO Unions on I9 hubs. 

After four rides, I couldn’t be happier with the product. Definitely a company that I will continue to support. 

And, who knows, maybe I’ll try a WAO frame in a few years when I’ve had my fill of Ripmo.

Reply

FlipFantasia
+2 Lu Kz 4Runner1
Todd Hellinga  - Aug. 3, 2021, 2:43 p.m.

a lot of cool stuff overall, but imo the aesthetic is UNpleasingly angular and industrial

Reply

cooperquinn
+8 Todd Hellinga Derek Baker mrbrett BicycleHub Ryan Walters Lu Kz Mike Bragg bigbrett
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 3, 2021, 2:45 p.m.

oldmanshoutsatcloud.gif

Reply

FlipFantasia
0 4Runner1 Lu Kz
Todd Hellinga  - Aug. 3, 2021, 3:24 p.m.

shrug?

Reply

xy9ine
+6 Derek Baker Dave Smith Muesliman Timer Cam McRae mrbrett
Perry Schebel  - Aug. 3, 2021, 3:15 p.m.

I especially dig said aggressive angularity. Give me all the cubist aesthetics.

Reply

ridestuff
+1 Cam McRae
Derek Baker  - Aug. 3, 2021, 6:17 p.m.

If Brutalism was a bike...

(I think it looks rad ftr!)

Reply

Timer
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Timer  - Aug. 4, 2021, 1:09 a.m.

Nah. Forcing carbon fibre into angular shapes contradicts the brutalist point of showcasing the structural properties of the material. I also wouldn't consider a short-link four bar to be minimalist enough to qualify.

Reply

LWK
+4 Mammal Timer cedrico Cam McRae
LWK  - Aug. 3, 2021, 2:54 p.m.

The warranty includes repairing the frame (I assume there are some limitations/conditions to this).  But from the perspective of longevity and reducing waste, I think this is excellent.   And the bike looks excellent!

Reply

Ripbro
+1 Cam McRae
Ripbro  - Aug. 3, 2021, 3:17 p.m.

Impressed they are using torray carbon. Thats apparently the wonder carbon of the future. Maybe others are using but I haven’t read anyone else.

Very impressive looks, fit and finish for an initial product. Headtube seems too short. With my Ripmo I’m running a lot spacers and 40 mm rise bars to get the bars where I want them. At 6’, riding a large (475 mm reach), spacers reduce the reach a noticeable amount.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Ripbro
Cam McRae  - Aug. 3, 2021, 3:32 p.m.

That’s a legitimate comment but if you can go up a size, shortening the reach may not be an issue. The standover is world class so if you aren’t already proportioned for an XL it may not be a concern.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Aug. 5, 2021, 9:53 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Aug. 6, 2021, 6:04 a.m.

Wonder carbon of the future since 1971 [1860]. Like I9, Decatur is 4000km from Kamloops.  'Toray' appears to be in quotation marks in the 500-mile diet section, but that's also how it appears on company website, so those must be fibers rather than punctuation. Will wonders never cease

Reply

Endur-Bro
+1 Cam McRae
Endur-Bro  - Aug. 3, 2021, 6:33 p.m.

IMO the coolest part of the whole article is the whole Vlad PB article turning into him working at WAO.

Interesting that this front triangle will be the basis for two other bikes as well.  Be cool to offer XL rear end on L front end haha.

Reply

Poz
+2 Cam McRae Endur-Bro
Poz  - Aug. 4, 2021, 7:12 a.m.

Makes sense from a scalability sense. Guerilla Gravity does the same thing.

Reply

Ceecee
+1 Cam McRae
Ceecee  - Aug. 5, 2021, 6:16 a.m.

VY: made in Bulgaria

Reply

NealWood
+1 Cam McRae
NealWood  - Aug. 3, 2021, 10:02 p.m.

Great news about the local manufacturing.  I can also say that I crash damaged a rim recently and the staff at We are One were the best to deal with.  They totally took care of me. I will always speak positively about them.  They made me a fan.

Reply

lev
+3 Cr4w Velocipedestrian thaaad
Lev  - Aug. 4, 2021, 4:37 a.m.

It is great that a small company has achieved this, but surely carbon shouldn't be the future?

Reply

the-prophet
+4 Endur-Bro cedrico Lu Kz Mike Bragg
the prophet  - Aug. 4, 2021, 7:54 a.m.

Killer company, killer spec, awesome "philosophy", but a SRAM or SDG dropper over a 9point8?

Pretty sure Ontario is closer than Taiwan... ;)

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 cedrico Lu Kz
Cam McRae  - Aug. 4, 2021, 9:33 a.m.

Does 9.8 manufacture in Ontario? If so that would be a nice addition.

Edit: “Nine point Eight Inc. manufactures many of the components in our own factory. We use CNC machining and various proprietary manufacturing techniques and specialized equipment to manufacture high quality, high strength, light weight components.All products are assembled and tested in our own factory, to assure quality.”

Reply

DaveSmith
+2 Ryan Walters Todd Hellinga
Dave Smith  - Aug. 4, 2021, 9:43 a.m.

This is a very impressive debut as a first run product. 

It's doubly Impressive that WAO were able to spec the bike as well as they have considering that they are at the back of the spec bus as a nano-builder. Sure, I'll be swapping out a few bits as I have my biases but it is impressive balance of bits hung from those frames. Between the big guys buying everything in sight, 500+ day lead times, shipping container shortages, the rubber shortage(buy all your tires) and the general state of parts availability in general at a consumer level, I imagine the challenge of spec'ing the bikes was almost as hard as the building the bike itself.

Reply

FlipFantasia
0 Dave Smith ccrida
Todd Hellinga  - Aug. 4, 2021, 5:03 p.m.

thanks for the tire reminder, grabbed a couple more today off the other site buy and sell! ha!

Reply

syncro
+1 Cam McRae
Mark  - Aug. 4, 2021, 11:49 p.m.

nicely done gents

Reply

lamar454
+1 Cam McRae
Peter Appleton  - Aug. 6, 2021, 5:55 p.m.

The Magura's are wiping the floor versus shimano's these days love em

Reply

orsoleads
0
orsoleads  - Aug. 25, 2021, 2:48 p.m.

Great article! Do you have any idea when they may be readily available? I'd love to buy one for my son as a college graduation present.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.