Rev Grips Race NSMB AndrewM.JPG
REVIEW | EDITORIAL

Rev Grips Race Series Shock Absorbing Grip System

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Jan 19, 2021
Reading time

Micro-Suspension Products

It's really quite simple. As the mountain biker demographic continues to get older in body,* there will be an ever-growing number of micro-suspension products aiming to prolong our perhaps Quixotic quests to play mountain bicycles in the woods. These small-batch, limited-market, components won't be cheap but at the same time they aren't a lust purchase, like a ti-bolt kit or anodized widget, so their value has the potential, to be astounding.

*though, of course, not in heart

This is a more budget-friendly version of the Rev Pro. The Race version grips lack the tunable rate, aggressive machining, and rainbow of colour options, but for 60 USD instead of 90, they are good value if the 'medium-soft' bumpers work for you .

How do they work? The grip itself rotates around my handlebar suspended by a series of four rubber bumpers housed in each machined lock-on collar - eight elastomer bumpers per grip. Do they work? The trail-noise canceling effects are real but the benefits of those effects will vary by the rider. They are a huge benefit for riders who claim Rev grips are the difference between loving mountain biking and not mountain biking at all.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

I've ridden Rev grips on a rigid bike, hardtail, and two 6" full suspension bikes all with the same results - I don't notice them on the trail until the ride after I take them off.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM.JPG

These are the small (31mm diameter) grips. There is also a half-waffle (31mm), medium (32.5mm), RG5 (33mm center / 32.5mm ends), and large (34mm).

Elastomers?! I know, I know. Though often ridiculed for their leading roles in 90's suspension applications, and clip-in pedals that wouldn't always clip out, elastomers continue to humbly submit themselves to our service some twenty years after Proflex bikes and Judy Type-II fork spring upgrades began their (too) long, (too) slow fade into obscurity.

In this application, the grips are suspended progressively for a couple of millimeters of rotation in either direction, so about as much travel as my 90s Judy. The grips themselves don't make contact with the bar and unlike trying to measure the amount of flex in a handlebar, these suckers visibly move. It's initially disconcerting enough that when I first installed them my gut reaction was to pull them off, bin them and pretend they never arrived.

Unlike the more expensive Pro grip, the amount the Race grips move isn't tuneable; they're preset at the most commonly preferred setting, called medium-soft, and in my case, this is a great feature. If I had been sent the Pro grips I have no doubt I would have tuned those suckers until they moved so little I'd get more play from a worn-out set of lock-ons. Instead, I just opened my mind and went for a mountain bike ride.

Installation

Rev grips really aren't a big deal to install but I had a stressful flashback cutting the little elastomers from their rubber umbilical cord. The process reminded me of my attempts at making models as a kid, which were complete failures. Once I recovered it was smooth sailing following the instructions.

Rev Grips Instructions-Final-Insert_Ring.jpg

This all applies to Rev Race grips except for the tuning washers. Yes, I also laughed about bike grips that come with an instruction manual but it's a straightforward installation process.

One part of my experience that the average user is never going to encounter is removing and re-installing these grips between various bikes and handlebars. Each time I find it just a little bit trickier to get everything lined up and after about a half-dozen installs I had to replace a couple of the elastomers that were damaged in the process.

I also ended up needing to replace one clamp after many re-installs. I'm not fully prepared to throw myself under the bus for hamfistedness, as I'm known for my gentle touch, but at the same time, I'm totally prepared to give Rev a pass here considering how many times I tightened these beauties down. If they were my own, I wouldn't feel bad about having to purchase a single 9 USD replacement clamp.

Without grip-on-bar contact, Revs rely entirely on the clamps holding them in place. I probably wouldn't have trusted them at first so I devised an installation test, reefing on them with my rubber strap wrench until I was certain they would not be spin on my handlebar. Since I ran them on a number of bars from smooth carbon, to the textured-graphic PNW, to anodized aluminum, I repeated this test each time for peace of mind.

The end caps, which prevent the grips from sliding off even if improperly installed, are a big deal for Rev so I certainly didn't remove one to run a Wolf Tooth EnCase tool for a while, with no issues at all. That's not saying my absence of a catastrophic failure is evidence that such a failure can't occur; however I've never had a lock-on grip come flying off a bike while riding and I'm not concerned with these either.

That's not true for everyone however and I've come across a ridiculous number of bikes with scary-loose lock-on grips working in shops over the years (seriously, go check your grips. I'll wait). For those folks, Rev bar ends stay in place very solidly and could save them from some serious mishaps by preventing their grips from sliding off their bars. If this sounds like someone you know, Rev sells all their small parts separately and 20 USD is a fairly cheap investment in any friendship worth having.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

The end plugs are a required part of the system as per Rev. They expand, and retract, to fit every bar I had access to.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (8).JPG

They stay in place really, really well so if the grip isn't tightened enough it won't just slide off the bar.

Niche Needs

Like the Fasst Flexx bars, folks who haven't tried Rev grips - and those who have tried them but don't find them beneficial - have a tendency to turn their noses up at the added cost and complexity. I get it, I'm generally, happy with push-on grips. Rev grips are less niche than Fasst bars - appearance and weight wise - but not every rider will discover a benefit worthy of their cost. Even with a 30-day money-back guarantee there's a bit of a leap of faith involved in trying a set.

I think the less a rider needs a certain noise-canceling product the more likely they are to be skeptical of it. I've communicated with a number of riders now whose on-bike experiences have been made exponentially better by these grips and I have enough hours on them that I can appreciate how they can be the real revelation for some riders. Generally the riders I know who could use these work(ed) with their hands consistently, have had bad injuries, or otherwise suffer from cramping or numbing.

Maglock_pedals_nsmb_andrew_major_2.jpg?w=1600

It's safe to say I was solidly not a fan of Maglock pedals in terms of both their production and using the product but, I do think they're the most important pedal on the market in terms of covering a niche no one else touches.

Rev X Fasst Flexx

If I try I can notice these grips in the parking lot, and then never notice them at any point on a ride. Then, just like Fasst Flexx bars, the first ride after I take them off I'm notably less comfortable. They quietly cancel a lot of noise without changing my riding experience at all.

Speaking of the Fasst Flexx bar, I think there is some benefit when overlapping these products, both in terms of reduced forearm pump and being less beat up after a long day. I can appreciate where some riders are combining Flexx bars, Rev grips, high-end fork dampers, and spring conversions in an effort to make their trail experience survivable if not significantly more fun. The Flexx bar creates a gentler riding experience for my elbows and shoulders, while Rev grips are all about easing the repetitive strain on my hands and forearms.

Fasst Flexx Bar NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

I am a big fan of Fasst's Flexx bar but I understand that for most of us the benefits won't be immediately noticeable, and it certainly isn't sexy. I notice its absence when I take it off rather than noticing its presence when installed.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

Rev Race suspension grips provide relief in a very different plane and are both less physically invasive and less expensive. Both products do have a money-back guarantee.

The Hidden Costs

I'm a massive fan of Sensus Swayze push-on grips, and I prefer the feel of the squishy rubber and grip pattern over Revs every day of the week, but my hands feel notably better after a long gnarly ride with Revs than any other solution I've tried. I've recommended these grips to reams of my friends because of the numbness and/or pain they manage when riding.

There are two hidden costs not included in the sixty bucks that I should note. I don't have any struggle going back and forth between Rev Grips and my typical push-on setup, but others aren't so lucky and most folks who prefer Rev grips run them on all their mountain bikes. There's also the issue of the grip clamps themselves being very wide to the point that I'd go up at least a full cm of bar width, if not two, to accommodate them. With my push-on grips I run a 780mm bar and with Rev grips I prefer 790-800mm.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (9).JPG

One caution is that Rev grip clamps, particularly noticeably the outer clamp, are quite wide. It may necessitate a new wider handlebar for some riders.

Rev Grip Race NSMB AndrewM (10).JPG

It's worth it - absolutely worth it - for anyone who needs a bit of help holding on to their bar when trails get janky or because a repetitive-stress hand issue, or old injury, starts acting up.

Whether your hands have always gone numb descending, or you're just trying to reduce 'the claw' after holding onto the brakes through a series of bumps, there's a good chance Rev Race grips would work for you. They're 60 USD and they could easily disrupt your current status as a mountain biker; longer, harder, gnarlier, more frequent rides could be in your future.

Wrenching on bikes is particularly hard on the hands and forearms and the more time I spend on the tools, the more I appreciate these grips. There are days when I daydream about installing Rev Race grips on everything I ride offroad. There are other days where 13 USD Swayze grips, some spray paint, and some stainless trap wire seem like all I'll ever want or need.

Depending on what you currently run, 60 USD is probably less than twice what you paid for your last pair of standard lock-on grips. Needless to say, there's a lot more going on here.

Rev Race grips work perfectly for me and I prefer the simple aesthetic so I won't be spending the extra to get Rev Pros when these need replacing. I notice the difference in my hands on every bike, regardless of how much or little travel it has and while I don't need them I certainly would like to ride them on every rig.

Here's hoping more interesting, well thought-out, bike fit, and mirco-suspension, solutions are on the way.

Find more about Rev Race Grips here...

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Comments

Timer
+2 Sean Chee Andrew Major
Timer  - Jan. 18, 2021, 11:51 p.m.

These could be in my future because I’m very susceptible to “the claw”. But I’ll try cheap Renthal push-ons first and do some more fiddling with bar width and roll before making the jump.

Shoutouts to tool-porn, casually showing of those nice Wera keys.

Reply

Bad-Sean
+4 Andrew Major Rob Gretchen jaydubmah Andrew
Sean Chee  - Jan. 19, 2021, 3:58 a.m.

I absolutely love all my wera tools. I can’t deal with all my old cheap stuff anymore.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Timer
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:47 a.m.

Renthal Push-On or Sensus Swayze or any number of great options to start your journey with.

The Revs have a simpler install process (which sounds funny to write) and certainly have more effect on ‘The Claw.’ Cheers!

Reply

andrewfif
+1 Andrew Major
Andrew  - Jan. 19, 2021, 3:23 p.m.

Hey there! I used the Swayze as my gateway drug. Loved them but a little narrow for me. I’ve since moved on to the oury v2 push ons for the last couple of months and I’m in love. I use spray paint and it’s easy. Even removed and reinstalled no issues. I’m a huge tinkerer and have been really curious about these. I guess I can buy and return if I don’t like them...but have you used the oury v2 to compare? Those cushion areas I think move in a similar fashion so I’m curious if it’s worth the hassle. The bar width could be an issue for me too as those clamps are egregiously large.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Andrew
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:12 p.m.

Tried to dig you up a photo but can't find it. I want to love the Oury grips so badly but I get fierce cramping in my pinky finger after about 1/2 hour of riding. I think they're just a bit to thick for me?

Anyways, I had a pair that I 'customized' (shaved down where my pinky sits) that I really liked but it's too much work when the Swayze fits me perfectly. Certainly, the Oury push-on has more cushion (and is WAY better than the lock-on version).

Reply

andrewfif
+1 Andrew Major
Andrew  - Jan. 19, 2021, 10:54 p.m.

Thanks for looking. After a long chat on the phone with rev I went ahead and ordered a pro set (black because it’s softest by a tiny bit) in the rg5 size. Super curious but nervous about the bar width reduction as I’m on 780 sw lab 12 deg bars. Clamp width is 8.7mm so I’ll be on 760 pretty much. They told me try them and return it if I can’t handle the bar reduction. Really impressed already with the customer service. Thanks for your review as it finally got me curious enough.

Reply

BloodyShins
+3 Andrew Major Andrew AndrewR
Tim Williams  - Jan. 20, 2021, 4:51 a.m.

Probably a bit late for this comment now but you can fit the tuning washers that soften the pro series grips to the cheaper race grips, then all you're missing is the fancy machining which I find looks a bit flash anyway. That's what I did (Uk importer sells the washers on their own for about £6). As the race series inserts are softer than the pro series, you end up with quite a lot of rotation though. I found running the thinnest washer in the race grips gives a similar feeling to using all of them / softest setting with pro grips. My inserts lasted about a year and I've replaced them with the new one piece inserts from the pro series (so much less faff to fit) and added another tuning washer on each side. They are truly the best investment I've ever made on bike. I was struggling to ride any rough descent over about 2 mins before having to stop and shake my hands out, it was seriously getting me down. These things fixed it pretty much instantly & made more difference to my hand pain than my £1000 Lyrik ultimate. I totally get that people who have never suffered with arm pump and hand pain scoff at the price but they have let me enjoy biking again & that's worth 10x the price!

BadNudes
+1 Andrew Major
BadNudes  - Jan. 27, 2021, 12:44 p.m.

How is it that I still haven't read the phrase "push-on for the cush-on" in one of your articles? 
Where can one buy trap wire? Any tie wire I find at the usual scumbags' seems way too thick.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 27, 2021, 1:44 p.m.

I’m not that witty!

I’ve had the best results with 22-gauge and 20-gauge stainless snare wire. 22 is easier to work with but 20 is workable and more durable.

I usually buy it at Canadian Tire but you do have to be careful as they’ll sometimes sub a heavier, less workable, gauge in.

craw
+2 Andrew Major Mike Bragg
Cr4w  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:10 a.m.

When the article refers to the claw does he mean in a trail context or a bike park context? I mean, doesn't everyone get the claw in the bike park?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Cr4w Mike Bragg
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:59 a.m.

Both. Some folks get the “the claw” in five minutes of trail riding and that’s who I’m thinking of when I talk about it. But there are also plenty of riders who run these on their park bikes but not their trail bikes as a form of claw-reduction.

Reply

Brigham_Rupp
+1 Andrew Major
Brigham_Rupp  - Jan. 24, 2021, 11:54 a.m.

Great review. I've been curious about these. My fingers are fairly fine, but my wrists get a little cranky. Thank these would potentially have any effect? I'm on a Sentinel with a carbon bar.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 24, 2021, 5:23 p.m.

Have you tried any different bar sweeps? I've found in my experience - and feedback from other riders - that a 12° or 16° bar - depending on the bike/position - is the best thing for my wrists and forearms. 

I've had great experiences with SQLab 30X bars, the Fasst bar I run is 12° rather than 8°, and I hope more companies will get on board in the future. It's not to say that 7°, 8°, or 9° bars don't work best for some riders - maybe even most riders - but there are endless options with those standard backsweeps.

Reply

Brigham_Rupp
0
Brigham_Rupp  - Feb. 8, 2021, 6:16 a.m.

Haven't tried a different backsweep yet. Will have to check that out.

Bad-Sean
+3 Andrew Major Lynx . AndrewR
Sean Chee  - Jan. 19, 2021, 4:17 a.m.

Greater sweep in bars may look dorky but it’s comfy as hell and I really think more people should give them a go. Even if only because I would like more of them to be available in different widths and sweeps. 

Whilst I certainly don’t fall into the category of people who are susceptible to hand and upper limb strain issues, I am definitely paying more attention to ergonomics as I am aiming to get in minimum 20km of riding everyday. I live on a farm so this isn’t as silly as it would be if I still lived in the city. 

I’ve had an answer 2020 bar on my trail bike for the last six weeks. The amount of difference the increased sweep makes on my daily ride is quite surprising. I feel more relaxed on the bike and come off it feeling a lot fresher, even when I’m riding in 40c heat. I like them so much so that I am considering buying another one for my enduro bike.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:48 a.m.

Would very much like to try the Revs mounted on a Whiskey Milhouse bar. The 20/20 is just a bit much for me in the sweep department.

Reply

Bikeryder85
+2 Andrew Major Lynx .
Bikeryder85  - Jan. 19, 2021, 7:41 a.m.

I second this! Sweep is where it is at for me, tried some salsa bars at 11 deg and has helped a nagging shoulder injury. Would love to try these if the Mrs. didn't already get me some new loam grips to try.

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Lynx
+1 Andrew Major
Lynx .  - Jan. 20, 2021, 6:43 a.m.

Man, if you liked the 11 degree Salsa (I bought and tried one too coming from a 9 degree FUNN bar and couldn't notice the difference, really, it now resides on my commuter) you should try the SQLab 30X bar with 16 degree sweep, it's so lovely. If I had the $$ to spare, I'd buy one for every bike I own, but for now they reside on the rigid Unit where they're most needed. Andrew did a good write up on it a while back.

Reply

craw
+6 jaydubmah ManInSteel Lynx . Mammal Speeder1 Pete Roggeman
Cr4w  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:13 a.m.

Handlebar backsweep/upsweep and saddle widths are the two remaining one-size-fits-all ideas that hopefully will die soon. It took a while but variable rear center lengths are finally here. There are lots of different people with lots of different needs. 

While we're at it can we eliminate the idea of shorts that have the same inseam length for every size? That's ridiculous too.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9 a.m.

Bar options are slowly getting there!

Reply

WalrusRider
+2 Andrew Major Cam McRae
WalrusRider  - Jan. 19, 2021, 5:07 a.m.

I ride with a few grandpas and they all swear by these Rev grips. I'm still using my Ergon GE1s but at some point I may have to give these a try. A few years a go I decided to try riding with my brake levers in a flatter position and it made a massive difference for me when it comes to hand fatigue. It's something I recommend to anyone experiencing arm pump and hand fatigue.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:49 a.m.

Hahahaha. Yep, when you need them you need them!

My brake levers moved flatter and flatter and then back a ways again. I like a bit different angles with different lever shapes too - I think the key is to be open to experimenting.

Reply

Enurjetik
+3 Andrew Major Cr4w chachmonkey
Enurjetik  - Jan. 19, 2021, 5:51 a.m.

You're my guy, Andrew! I love how you're out there reviewing these products for niche cases. I actually logged into NSMB today to ask about your long-term thoughts on the Fasst Flexx bars on a rigid bike, and here you are covering another item I just picked up. 

Note before I proceed: Rev has changed how it makes the elastomers and you no longer have to cut them out. They now come in a ring that you simply push into the clamps. 

Okay, onto the meat (engines?) of my comment. And I’ll just put the core question up front: has the Fasst Flexx become your go-to when riding rigid on single track? 

I'm converting my hard tail to a rigid covid gravel bike. (RSD 510 suspension-corrected fork FTW!) Now that my bike is taking shape I'm giving some thought to riding it on mellower single track with my buddies who are just now getting into real mountain biking. My thinking is that a rigid single speed will make those trails more fun/exciting at the speeds we're riding. The last time I owned a rigid single speed was the Trek Superfly SS with a Chupacabra 29x3 tire up front. I remember getting pretty beat up, so I'm planning to do it right this time with the Rev grips, a Vittoria Airliner insert so I can run crazy low pressures, and possibly the Fasst bars. I looked at the Redshift Shockstop stem, but then found a FAQ on Redshift's site that said the stem isn't designed for technical mountain biking and could result in catastrophic failure. So... that’s a hard pass.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:05 a.m.

Cheers!

When Fasst makes their 50mm rise aluminum bar in the future I will put one on the Walt for sure. I actually find it makes an even bigger difference riding full suspension through chunk and chunder than at rigid Walt speed picking lines - but I do also have a 2.8” tire with CushCore. 

A big factor here is I’ve really adapted my rigid riding to the very tall cockpit of the ProTaper bar and don’t feel like relearning.

I like more sidewall support (and damping) than the Chupacabra/XR2 offers. In my case a Plus sized CushCore and WTB Vigilante. The combo stands up even when really aired down.

Reply

GladePlayboy
+3 Andrew Major Cr4w Vik Banerjee
Rob Gretchen  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:06 a.m.

As someone with some genetic hand issues and having had multiple surgeries, dislocations, etc I can attest to how well these work, especially in bike park situations... 10/10 from the Russian judge...

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Rob Gretchen
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:52 a.m.

Rob, do you run the medium-soft Race or are you tuning the Pro model to be a bit stiffer?

Reply

GladePlayboy
+1 Andrew Major
Rob Gretchen  - Jan. 19, 2021, 7:19 a.m.

I am running the Pro version on 2 bikes.... more on  the slightly stiffer side.   Still plenty of compliance and great feel.

Reply

DaveSmith
+4 Andrew Major Cam McRae Deniz Merdano Pete Roggeman
Dave Smith  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:45 a.m.

These things work. I have been suffering from hand fade/weakness which is a result of multiple nerve pinches for about 2 years now. I can ride an extra lap with these where before I was claw'd out about half way through my fist lap. Will buy again.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Cr4w Dave Smith
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:02 a.m.

Are you on the Pro or the Race Dave? 

If the Pro have you tuned them firmer?

Glad they’re working for you!

Reply

DaveSmith
+1 Andrew Major
Dave Smith  - Jan. 19, 2021, 10:28 a.m.

I'm on the Race. After talking to a few others that have them the best results were with the softer compound that the Race comes with vs the Pro. They were also $20 less.

Reply

denomerdano
+1 Andrew Major
Deniz Merdano  - Jan. 20, 2021, 12:08 p.m.

As a recent inductee into the hand pain club, I am going to have to give these a try. 

How do I get a hold of a pair?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Deniz Merdano
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 12:35 p.m.

Your preferred local shop can bring them in - Alba is the distributor. You can also order directly through Alba’s website or directly from Rev.

Cheers!

Reply

Jcmonty
+1 Andrew Major
Jcmonty  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:22 a.m.

I have had the "Pro" versions for a few years now, swapping between different bikes and other grips in the process.  My findings:

1) the new elastomers that are in a single ring are miles better in terms of being able to setup correctly without getting the the elastomer jammed or cut.  Installation is easier, and it seems more consistent overall in performance. This is a big improvement IMO.

2) I have had these come loose on rides (old elastomers), which is highly disconcerting and hard to reassemble on the trail.  My multi-tool (Specialized Swat) didn't have the correct hex key in that case.

3) Currently with these on my hardtail, I definitely appreciate the feel more than when I had it on my full suspension.  To me these play less of a hand fatigue reduction role than inserts or good suspension, but it's noticeable.  You definitely feel a bit less directly connected to the trail - in a good way - through chatter sections.  The rotation bit never bothered me even in full soft mode on the Pros.  It's something you get used to really quick IMO.

4) They have a new grip that is more ergonomic,  which I think could be of benefit.  I always found these a bit too slim (I am on medium) in certain portions of the grip. I also don't always get along with the dual clamp setup on certain handlebars - with my hand seemingly on the outer clamp portion rather than on the grip.  I have Ergons on my full suspension for comparison.

--Edit-- I should add  that my original intent was to help with finger pain on chatter in fast sections (braking bumps, etc) as well as some arm pump.  I broke my thumb and seem to have lingering issues with longer, rougher descents.  When I originally bought these, they were for an Evil Insurgent (a size or two too small) - so lots have changed with my overall setups since then as well.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 10:57 p.m.

I haven't seen the more ergonomic RG5 shape in person but it seems a lot of riders are really interested in it so it's only a matter of time.

Cheers!

Reply

gregster77
+1 Andrew Major
gregster77  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:50 a.m.

Have you tried the Ergon GA3's and wondering how these would compare?  The GA3's have the paddle, i certainly feel a difference compared to a 'regular' grip, but thinking of putting something like this on my DH bike for park.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 12:56 p.m.

I haven’t used the GA3 but I’ve ridden a few Ergon grips and I have tried a number of different grips with paddles.

I quite like grips with paddles for bikes where I’m static a lot (flat bar commuter) but don’t get along with them at all on a mountain bike.

I find, comparatively, that a firm ergonomically shaped grip like the Ergons doesn’t work as well for me as a softer grip like the push-on Sensus but if I am going to ride a lock-on grip the Ergon GE1 Slim is at the top of my list.

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Lynx
0
Lynx .  - Jan. 20, 2021, 6:56 a.m.

I got a pair of GA3s to try as I thought that the smaller wing would be more suited to proper, tech, hardcore MTBing compared to their other grips with wings, but boy was I wrong. The wings are so flexible and weak, they offer no help support and the grip itself is very thin/small, got rid of them as soon as I could. 
FYI, I've riden Ergon grips since their introduction GP1, GP2, GS1, GE1, GE1 EVO, GA2, GA2 FAT & GA3. Of all those grips, the only ones I currently use are the GA2 on loaner bikes, GA2 FAT on my FS, and on my rigid I run the new Oury single clamp 33 grips - they have some movement in them because of how soft the "rubber" is and are super comfy.

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deleted_user_8375
+1 Andrew Major
[user profile deleted]  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:57 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 11:44 a.m.

I’ll ask! Thanks.

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andyf
+1 Andrew Major
andyf  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:58 a.m.

I tried the Sensus Swayze push ons after reading your article last June and now i'm hooked on the added length compared to most other grips. I was tempted to cut off the flange plus ~1cm during installation but i'm glad I didn't. I feel like the extra room to move on the grip helps more with discomfort/numbness than any improvement in vibration damping compared to lock on grips.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 11:44 a.m.

Removing that hard plastic core makes such a difference. Cheers!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:17 p.m.

Since push-on grips are all relatively cheap, I think it's worth it to try a few to decide on a favourite. I also really like the Pulsar from Eclat and the Super Tacky from Renthal.

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deleted_user_8375
+1 Andrew Major
[user profile deleted]  - Jan. 19, 2021, 10:05 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 11:43 a.m.

Sensus Swayze push-on for me. But I don’t need Rev grips I just like them.

Reply

andy-eunson
0 Andrew Major Shackleton
Andy Eunson  - Jan. 19, 2021, 10:09 a.m.

I have a pair of these. I rode them for about a year but it made no difference at all to me. When I grab a non rev grip and “rev” my hand, the soft tissue on my palm moves as much as a rev grip. While riding with rev grips I can’t feel any difference as Andrew says. I never ride park though but I do ride some long descents. I do cramp at times in my forearms but that’s more to do with being out for too long. I’ll get those cramps road riding too. 

I think they will help some riders with certain issues. I had elbow issues that were solved by rotating the bar a bit to change the sweep. Too wide with too little sweep causes me to have shoulders too high. 

Sometimes I think a person’s review of something is affected by how much they spent. I read ski reviews of boutique skis like DPS or Black Crows which can cost upwards of $1400. But I have also seen videos of those same people skiing and more often than not they aren’t t strong skiers. And I know really strong skiers that tried those boutique skis and sell them. There is a reluctance I think for someone to admit they spent a lot of money on something that does nothing.

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AndrewMajor
+2 Andy Eunson chachmonkey
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 11:43 a.m.

Maybe, but I don’t have any financial interest in these grips and I certainly notice them. 

I do think, as I noted perhaps ad nausea, that people that NEED them will love them - see Dave Smith’s comment for example - and the rest of us will see degrees of value.

Same with the Flexx bars or Active saddles. They make mountain biking possible, or at least more possible, for some riders.

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pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 26, 2021, 12:14 p.m.

In general, you can't trust a review from someone who bought a product - at least not as an individual data point. As you stated, once someone has spent money on something, they've made their choice, so their bias is baked in - doubly true if there was extra risk associated with that purchase, whether it's going premium, first gen, new tech, etc. That doesn't mean, of course, that that person's review would have no value, but there's a reason why good product reviewers with experience and ethics are important. Those two e's are vital: most purchasers don't ride 5, 10 or more bikes per year, test drive that many cars, helmets, forks, shoes...whatever, so that experience is rare and also has value. 

Then there's the ethics side...you also can't trust a 'review' that appears on someone's site or Youtube channel when the product was given to that person (plus cash, some of the time) in exchange for the review, or they're sponsored. That's not a review, that's an endorsement. And hey, you could point me to an unbiased endorsement (they exist but you gotta look hard) but that doesn't disprove the point, it's the exception that proves it.

This goes both ways. Someone who buys a product and loves it - well, ok, that's what you hoped for when you bought it. But there are lots of terrible reviews from buyers as well - surely those are also valid? Also yes and no, as anyone can attest who's spent time reading reviews anywhere, from independent sites to amazon to yelp (ugh).

Usually, I'll take the figure skating approach - disregard the top and bottom score(s) and see what the majority of people say (if we're talking peer or consumer reviews). In some industries and categories, there are pro reviewers I trust, and I give way more weight to what they have to say than the keyboard warrior who jumps onto a review site to crow about the product they love (which they just took out of the plastic and haven't used yet) or the thing they hate (because they got unlucky with a warrantable item, can't RTFM (read the fucking manual) or generally don't understand or made the wrong purchase decision).

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cerealkilla_
0
jdt  - Jan. 19, 2021, 11:52 a.m.

The extra-wide collars are a deal-breaker for me, until I decide I also need a new bar. I like to ride close to the end of my bars, and can't imaging sliding in from 780 to 760. 

I also wonder if anyone has tried Revs AND the Flexx bar AND an Allsop flex stem? Wouldn't that be the more better than you can believe it?

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 12:59 p.m.

I haven’t ridden any of the new takes on a suspension stem except for Specialized’s gravel roadie system. As with anything I try to keep an open mind.

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sanesh-iyer
+1 Andrew Major
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 19, 2021, 1:34 p.m.

There's a fine line between rigid and damperless isn't there? 

Question: do you notice any warmth difference? My main grip problem is cold hands (and feet). I imagine the airgap with these would insulate your hands.

I run carbon bars for warmth alone.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 6:57 p.m.

Interesting question. I’ve ridden the grips on alloy and carbon bars and haven’t noticed a difference where with other grips - like with my push-on Swayze grips - I’ll notice a difference on a cold day.

I frankly hadn’t thought of it but I’d say you’re on to something.

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sanesh-iyer
+1 Andrew Major
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:11 p.m.

Sorry just to clarify:

Normally, when you ride your regular grips (Swayze) you feel a difference between Alu and carbon in the cold. Presumably colder/more heat loss with alu.

With these grips you didn't notice a difference in coldness/heatloss between bar materials? I guess that means they are similar in warmth to your carbon bar.

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sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:15 p.m.

Sold.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Sanesh Iyer
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:24 p.m.

Total aside, but in terms of interesting people doing interesting things with carbon fiber, in their garages - Regular.Bike handlebars!

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sanesh-iyer
+1 Andrew Major
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:52 p.m.

Sanesh and Andrew posting random MTB things on an NSMB the comment section late at night seems like a dark hole. 

That's cool. And bold. I'd like to do some of my own carbon work one day. Maybe I'm overthinking it but the safety Gear and tooling is a high cost. Though I've thought about hand carving a frame mold. 

Did you look at the Rev stem? It's pretty cool with the light mount and the bell with a muter. If the bell wasn't 60 bucks that package would have been in my cart too.

Incase you want to dive into carbon depths, the guerilla gravity patent is here for you. There are a couple holes in it which is kind of interesting. I wonder if it's going to get granted, that's a long time in review. 

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20180264756A1/en?oq=US20180264756A1

And, I wonder when we'll see self healing carbon bikes. This stuff works, it's not vaporware. 

https://comppair.ch/about-us/

AndrewMajor
+1 Sanesh Iyer
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:15 p.m.

Interesting! I thought GG had their patent already.

Does healable carbon fiber mean no fatigue life (heals minor stress) or is it like T1000?!?! Had never heard of it. 

Drew from Regular.Bike has absolutely invested a fair amount of cash in his garage operation.

AndrewMajor
+1 Sanesh Iyer
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 8:15 p.m.

Yes, absolutely. When I see pictures of fat bikes out in the snow with metal bars and metal pedals it blows my mind. Carbon brake levers make the biggest difference for me, but I would happily run a carbon bar for the coldest few months of the year.

I still think there are lots of good reasons to run a good aluminum bar over carbon when it isn't cold - especially folks on a budget who are going to think twice about replacing a bar after a bad crash - but cold-weather performance is not one of them.

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sanesh-iyer
+2 Andrew Major Andy Eunson
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 20, 2021, 5:15 a.m.

Any more images of his work?

T1000 is a brand/model of carbon fibre, not a matrix or composite. compair makes a matrix. Matrix plus fibre equals composite. Their matrix, if I remember correctly, can be used with more or less any fibre. That's the idea. 60x the fatigue life (i.e. you can reset to t=0 60x) and ability to repair minor dings (scratched bars!) That are either compromised matrix or would act as stress risers.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Sanesh Iyer
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7:15 a.m.

Hahahahahaha T-1000... like Robert Patrick

sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 19, 2021, 1:34 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

grimwood
+1 Andrew Major
grimwood  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:03 p.m.

Andrew, nice review, as always. I had the pro version for a little while. I noticed that my wrists felt a little better on some of my rides (but not all). But the calluses on my hands hurt way more. I haven’t tried to tune the grip yet. I think they would be great with a different grip pattern. Maybe the waffle is better? I just went back to my Renthal lock ons, which are great. And now I’m trying the Sensus push ons as well (as you know).

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 19, 2021, 9:08 p.m.

Thanks Mike!

If they did a thinner version of the new tapered RG5 I'd be very interested to try it, but it's based on the medium size which is thicker than I like.

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Gbergevin
+1 Andrew Major
Gbergevin  - Jan. 20, 2021, 6:29 a.m.

I've had terrible hand trouble since I was a kid, riding bikes, motorcycles, even dealing with dumbbells, barbells, etc when lifting. Numbness, shooting pains, etc, less 'the claw' or crazy forearm pump. I also have very large mitts; all my gloves are 2XL, I've even got some "XYL" moto gloves - and not all those XXLs are big enough.

My 'solution' has been various combos of grips and gloves...I currently favor a glove with as little going on on the palm as possible; no seams, no pads, nothing to create a hot spot or pinch. I've used every grip Ergon makes, plenty of ODIs, Squarewave XLs, Meaty Paws, etc...

The BEST grip for me is SQLabs MTB/Tech grip in large. It's a downright weird shape, now the paddle or shade of a paddle Ergon uses, something much more organic and irregular. Rubber is squishy, and they're huge... Large is really large, especially with winter gloves. I tried them because I was so happy with their saddles (611s), and I tried the saddles in part because of the reviews here... definitely recommend them.

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Lynx
0
Lynx .  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7 a.m.

Overall reply about the grips - if I was going to spend that sort of cash on something to help the "feel" of my bike, it would be on some inserts  like the Rimpacts to help with some dampening and rebound control on the rigid, other than that, with a bar with proper sweep, I think there's not much need for "gimics" - think people need to try bars with sweep greater than 9 degrees if they have hand issues. Other than that I'll stick to my nice, cushy OURY single clamp lock ons, thanks - great value at just over $30.

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AndrewMajor
+2 kmag76 Spencer Nelson
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7:21 a.m.

Given it’s a passion of mine I’ve tried all those combos (run CushCore, plus tires, more sweep, push-on grips, Flexx bar) and the Rev grips are definitely doing something different than bar sweep.

As with the major underlying theme of the article - if you don’t need them great, but if you do need them they’re brilliant. I think there are some solid comments here (above) from people who do need/love them and as I noted in the article I know a few folks who work(ed) with their hands who basically can’t  ride without them. 

Keep an open mind. There may come a day that micro-suspension products keep you riding too.

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kmag76
+1 Andrew Major
kmag76  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7:11 a.m.

Great article Andrew!

I run these on all of my bikes, Race version and Pro versions. And prefer the medium/soft. 

I find that they really do work for me, taking out a lot of the arm pump on those fast rough trails, I bought Med, Waffle and Large grip sleeves, and prefer the Large soft sleeves the most from what I have tried. (the waffle is a very hard uncomfortable rubber IMO)

I can see how these probably aren't for everyone, I kinda thought they were a dumb idea when I first heard of them, but I was trying to build up a bike during Covid last summer, and most of my favourite grips were sold out, so I went with the race series, and haven't looked back, buying 2 more sets.

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AndrewMajor
+1 kmag76
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7:24 a.m.

Cheers! You’re probably in the same category as me where you like them but don’t need them?

Very different value propositions.

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kmag76
+1 Andrew Major
kmag76  - Jan. 20, 2021, 7:41 a.m.

Yes, defiantly do not need them. But they do help with the overall ride experience. Similar to running inserts... Don't need them, but they add to the experience!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 8:59 a.m.

Totally. And hopefully our positive experiences, and talking about the product, helps folks who do need them, like Tim Williams or Dave Smith above, to hear about them. 

At least that was my experience with Fasst bars. For every couple or few unimaginative “that’s stupid because I don’t need it” comments out there I’d get a message or see a comment from someone for whom they were experience changing.

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Speeder1
+1 Andrew Major
Speeder1  - Jan. 20, 2021, 10:55 a.m.

I've been on these for a season and I like them. I bought them after reading positive reports from others with hand issues and also an interesting review of them from theloamwolf. I've had serious arthritis issues in my thumb in the past and these do make a difference for me with less thumb MCP joint pain during and after riding. I work in a profession where I am doomed without good dexterity and hand grip and these are a noticable improvement in hand wear and tear. Expensive up front but a tiny price to pay for something that might keep me riding and working as I age into second tier masters class obscurity.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Speeder1
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 11 p.m.

"Expensive up front but a tiny price to pay for something that might keep me riding and working as I age into second tier masters class obscurity."

THIS!

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Shackleton
+2 Andrew Major Speeder1
Shackleton  - Jan. 20, 2021, 12:44 p.m.

As someone suffering from vibration sensitive carpal and cubital tunnel syndrome I'll add my tuppence worth:

Revgrips: amazing at reducing vibration fatigue but only if you have small to medium hands. I have large hands and they are just too narrow so I end up overgripping, leading to forearm fatigue! I've ended up back on my sensus meaty paws /ergon GA2 fat (full sus) and wolftooth mega fat silicone grips (hardtail). A real shame as otherwise they are superb. I hope they develop some grips in the >34mm diameter range to cater for larger than average hands.

Bars and backsweep: 8-10 degrees seems good for me, Raceface atlas (8 deg) on the full sus with greater sweep better on the hardtail for more xc stuff (nukeproof horizons - 10 deg). I have an sqlab 30x 12deg sweep bar, and it is more comfortable, but only in a very limited range; I can have it set up for climbing or descending, not both. I also run 31.8 bars, no point adding unnecessary stiffness! 

I tried Spank vibrocore bars; not sure I noticed anything special in terms of vibration but they were a nice shape. Padded endura humvee gloves made more of a difference.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Speeder1
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 11:03 p.m.

Have you sent this feedback to Rev? 

I've talked to some riders who wish the small was smaller and I think they're SOL, but folks looking for thicker grips - and, anecdotally, there seems to be plenty of them - should be easy enough to accommodate if the demand is there.

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Shackleton
+1 Speeder1
Shackleton  - Jan. 21, 2021, 12:13 a.m.

I did feedback to revgrips, they seemed pretty indifferent tbh. I was a bit surprised, particularly as larger grips for a given hand size generally reduce issues if you have hand troubles, so would have thought that this would fit with their usp more than selling 5 different minor variations all aimed at the same size hands!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 24, 2021, 5:28 p.m.

I was thinking about the Meaty Paws grips today and didn't that project start out with Kyle Strait running a push-on grip over a lock-on grip? It would be interesting to know the exact process because by the same concept one could possibly stretch a grip over a 31mm Rev grip to create a thicker option.

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Skeen
+3 Andrew Major Speeder1 Spencer Nelson
Skeen  - Jan. 20, 2021, 6:42 p.m.

I started down this path with a Spank vibrocore bar on my enduro FS bike because it had the right dimensions, was the right price and I was interested to try something new. I definitely notice less hand/ arm fatigue after rides. Next I decided to take it a step further and combo vibrocore bars with rev grips on my Honzo ESD. Even through the front  has plenty of suspension I was looking for any extra relief possible due to a pinched nerve in the should causing several months of finger pain. I added both components at once so it’s hard to tease out the details but the setup feels great! I am running softest washer combo and never notice unwanted movement on the trail.

Thanks for reviewing Andrew, that was another fun read. And as others have said, keep the niche product reviews coming!

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AndrewMajor
+1 Speeder1
Andrew Major  - Jan. 20, 2021, 11:04 p.m.

Cheers! 

I've really appreciated all the personal stories from folks with hand issues that these grips help to relieve.

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