GeoMetron G16 Full Length
Something Old, Something New…

Personal Rides: GeoMetron G16

Words AJ Barlas
Photos AJ Barlas
Date Jan 8, 2018

Chris Porter is a name some may recognize for his challenging theories on bike size and geometry. The mastermind behind Mojo Suspension and now, GeoMetron Bikes, he is a constant tinkerer and someone who regularly questions the way things are done. In 2014 I stumbled across Porter’s Size Matters articles, a series that highlighted a number of points which I agreed with and left me pondering many others. I dabbled with the ideas for a number of years but mid-way through 2017, when I jumped aboard the Mondraker Dune, things changed more drastically. 

The Mondraker Dune is a great bike that offers some adjustability and going from the short chainstay to the longer one made it even better. I still wanted more, though; more size, stability, and compliance—so I dove in and spent three days on a GeoMetron G16. During those three days, I found the answers to all of those desires and more. I learned that I needed to be more open-minded than I was, I learned that individual numbers on paper mean jack in the real world, and I learned that until trying something very different, you never really know.


GeoMetron G16 Three-Quarter Front View
GeoMetron G16 Non-Driveside


You may have read in my Best of 2017 that I had acquired my own GeoMetron G16. While the bike will be riddled with test parts for years to come, initially I wanted to build it up with my own parts but without spending a fortune to get it there. Sure, new parts and insanely expensive “dream builds” are great to look at but this is something a little different—it focuses on functionality rather than how much money I could spend because really, I don’t have enough to do that anyway. I feel that geometry and suspension are the most important elements—the heart of a bike if you like—and this is where I was most willing to spend for top dollar parts. The rest is a mix of stuff I had laying around and bits and pieces that were obtained in the leadup to building my next bike.


GeoMetron G16

FRAME: GeoMetron G16

Size: Longest  •  Travel: 155mm  •  Shock: Fox Float X2 (215 x 64) 

As mentioned, prior to jumping in one-hundred percent on the G16 I first spent three days riding one, that was set with the 175mm rear travel setting. While the 175mm was incredibly efficient and there weren't any problems with momentum on mellow, flat trails in Squamish, like Rob’s and Cliff’s Corners, I still felt that I didn’t need that much travel. Having ridden a lot of 120–170mm travel bikes over the years, the 150–160mm travel range seems to be my happy place when rolling on 650b hoops. I have no regrets with opting for the 155mm travel option and have found the bike to be incredibly efficient both in its use of the travel available and its momentum on the trails.  It's also incredibly versatile, proving to me again that numbers on paper don’t tell the full story. A recent XC loop in Bellingham solidified this with only my (lacking) fitness being a problem.


Mojo badge

GeoMetron bikes are differentiated by the Mojo label in the seat tube gusset…

Nicolai Head Tube emblem

...But the bike is manufactured by Nicolai in Germany. A brand renowned for the quality of their craft. 


The bike is suspended with a 2018 Fox Float X2 which sees an improved damper over the 2017 model, giving the dials more usable range. It's also the shock that the G16 is typically sold with though there are a number of builds around with X2 coils and other shocks. I opted for this shock because the 2018 functions very well and I was really happy with it during the few days spent on a demo. Lots of adjustability is also preferred and the X2’s high and low-speed rebound and compression damping allow for this. The can is filled with bands adding to the bike's already bottomless feel, while the damper settings aim to prevent harsh feedback deeper in the stroke and take advantage of the traction the well configured Horst Link design provides.


Fox Float X2 on the G16

The 215 stroke length usually comes with a climb switch, but it was removed because I never really use them and on this bike there's even less of a need.

The Fox Float X2 on the G16

The adjustability of the X2 and the 2018 versions quality of travel and adjustments make it an easy choice for me. 


Current experience is that the G16 rockets through chuck and minimal rider input is required to squirt momentum out of features on the trail. Traction is the best I’ve ever experienced and the confidence provided in corners has had me laughing like a mad scientist on numerous occasions. While it's early days on the bike, this is a great start.


Fox 36 Factory Float

FORK: Fox Factory 36

Model: FIT HSC/LSC  •  Travel: 170mm 

Over the last 18 months, every Fox fork I’ve ridden has resulted in a very positive experience. The new 2018 36 continues on that trend, providing an incredibly efficient use of the 170mm travel. Nothing is perfect, though, and I am currently working on eking out a little more from the mid-stroke while balancing the top and bottom ends of the travel. Still, this is the best single crown fork that I’ve ridden to date thanks to the firm chassis paired with a fantastic damper. 

One change I made immediately was to drop the QR15 axle in favour of Fox’s own Kabolt, a 15mm through axle threaded in securely with a 5mm hex key. So far there have been zero issues with the sleek setup, with everything remaining in place. Another change that may be in the cards is to throw in a 180mm air shaft, which will be done more for bike shape than for the travel. The G16 is currently being run by the staff and many riders at 180mm and is said to provide an even better ride. My current stance has me leaning that way, but I won’t make a decision on the move until I finish working on the mid-stroke support that I desire.


Easton Arc 30 with Specialized Hillbilly Tire

WHEELS & TIRES

Easton Arc 30/27 laced to DT Swiss 240s Hubs  •  Front Tire: Specialized Hillbilly Grid 2.6  •  Rear Tire: Specialized Purgatory Grid 2.6  •  Extras: Wolf Tooth Boostinator Set

A couple of years ago I invested in a set of custom wheels. Without question, the hub was going to be DT because I've found them to be very reliable and easy to maintain when required. I opted for the 240s over the 340 to save some weight in the wheels, but at the time rim widths were still in their infancy. After a number of good experiences with Easton’s Arc rims (now under the Race Face brand) and their availability in a number of sizes, they became the rim of choice. 

I opted for a wider 30mm internal width front rim and a slightly narrower 27mm internal width rear. Of all the wheels I’ve spent time on this range seemed to be the happy place and moving forward a couple of years since first purchasing these, it appears to be the case for many brands. But why opt for a wider front than rear? The idea behind it was to provide a slightly wider profile front tire to help with steering and comfort in rough terrain—also to assist in those “oh shit” times of need—while the narrower rear wheel makes the bike slightly quicker in direction changes. I’ve found it provides a really enjoyable dynamic whenever these wheels are thrown back on a bike.


Wolf Tooth Boostinator front

The Wolf Tooth Boostinator on the DT 240 front hub is a single piece — a wider end cap on the drive side of the bike. The replacement cap is easy to fit with the DT threaded design on this version of the hub. 

Wolf Tooth Boostinator rear

The rear Wolf Tooth Boostinator for a DT 240 hub features a new end cap and a spacer to place the rotor in the correct position. No issues with brake noise or loosening of the bolts.


The only problem was that when I bought these wheels bikes were more commonly sporting 15x100mm front axles and 12x142 rear ends. With the wheels sitting in a corner and having seen little use, I couldn’t part with them and opted to try out Wolf Tooth’s Boostinator kit, which would allow them to be mounted to the GeoMetron. The kit requires a slight re-dish to the wheels, but it ends up providing a more even dish than stock, which should result in a longer lasting wheel. So far, so good.


GeoMetron G16 Front On

The Specialized Hillbilly 2.6 up front is ready to party. Just looking down at the tire gets me giddy and so far it's treated me very well on the trail. 

Specialized Hillbilly

The Hillbilly exhibits similarities to the Butcher, though with a squarer more widely spaced tread. I always sticker over the recesses in the fork arches to prevent crap building up back there. 


With it being winter here in the Northern Hemisphere I opted to try Specialized’s updated Hillbilly up front and not needing that much tire out back, their Purgatory, each in a 2.6” size, and with the Grid casing. The tires provide excellent value at 60 US MSRP and feature Specialized's most up to date carcass and rubber compounds. The new 2.6” tires measure closer to 2.4 under the calipers, which for me is perfect. Volume is similar to the current range of e*thirteen TRS tires and they feature Specialized’s new Gripton tire compound. So far these have been great in the wildly varied conditions that we’ve been experiencing here in Coastal B.C. They’ve been reliable in everything from snow and thick frost to wet roots and rock. The Grid carcass has provided a great trail feel for the conditions.


GeoMetron G16 SRAM Eagle Drivetrain

DRIVETRAIN

SRAM X0/GX Eagle Mix  •  e*thirteen LG1r Chainguide  •  Race Face Next R Cranks  •  Deity T-Mac Pedals

After spending some time on test bikes with Eagle drivetrains, I was left really impressed. Admittedly, when SRAM first released Eagle the thought of it simply being the 11-speed system with an extra gear was prominent, but did it ever prove me wrong. The shifts are lighter than any other drivetrain I’ve ridden and the setup runs so quietly that it’s hard to believe. I can’t speak to long-term durability at this point but Cam will in his soon to come review of the GX Eagle drivetrain. 

The drivetrain here consists of an X01 Eagle cassette and derailleur, paired with the GX Eagle chain and shifter and is working well. Not much makes me happier than a quiet, well-functioning bike and the Eagle drivetrain is certainly holding up its part there. The only possible change I would make is thanks to more recent experiences: with it now being available I’m leaning toward GX replacements to save some coin when the time comes in the future.


GeoMetron G16 with SRAM Eagle X01

Before GX Eagle was available I got ahold of some X01 Eagle. Once it is worn it will likely be replaced with the higher value little brother.

GX Eagle Shifter

A GX Eagle shifter and chain were obtained later on. The DMR Deathgrips prevent an injury similar to skier's thumb in my right hand from flaring up too much, allowing me to continue riding how I want. 


The e*thirteen LG1r guide has been on three of my bikes now and it’s still going strong despite many connections with obstacles. Moving it onto the G16 was an easy decision and it provides extra piece of mind that the chain will stay put while also providing protection when going full ham and snagging things like a complete hack. The Race Face Next R cranks are the only test product on the bike here and after a set of Shimano Saints got lost in the mail from a Cyber Monday sale gone wrong, they’ve been working flawlessly. It’s also fantastic that they offer the Next R with a spindle that covers an 83mm BB width and while I generally prefer a crank to be alloy, these have been great so far. (Look for a review in the spring.)


Race Face Next R and e*thirteen guide

The Next R crank from Race Face is the only test product on the bike after my Shimano Saints were lost in the mail. They've been a happy coincidence given they cover the 83mm BB standard that this all-mountain sled sports, without needing a DH crank. 

Deity T-Mac Pedals

The Deity T-Mac pedals offer gob loads of traction and plenty of support thanks to their large, square shape. Others may offer bigger platforms on paper but not many feel as big and supportive in reality.


Having ridden a lot of different flat pedals over the years, and especially in the last 12 months, the Deity T-Mac is one that I keep coming back to. The large platform is great, but it’s the shape of the platform that really makes this pedal so good. For some shoes, like the updated Specialized 2FO, I find the platform is too big for my size 10.5 US foot, but for Five Ten, Giro, Shimano, it’s the best I’ve ridden to date, providing loads of traction and a nice planted feel.


Renthal 31mm Apex Stem

COCKPIT

Deity Black Label Bar: 38mm x 800mm (25mm rise pictured)  •  Renthal Apex Stem: 40mm (31mm pictured)  •  Saddle: Fabric Line  •  Race Face Turbine Dropper: 175mm

Up until last year, I swore by Renthal’s Fatbar but began to suffer from new issues with hand and arm pain. No matter what I did elsewhere on the bike the discomfort persisted until the bars were swapped. Trying the larger 9-degree sweep Deity Black Label bars resulted in an increased level of comfort and that's what I've ridden since. 

I prefer 31.8 bars because, in my opinion, the move to 35mm was unwarranted and I haven't come across a bar that changed my opinion. With reports of some brands only developing 35mm to appease demand and putting R&D time into designing them to feel the same as their popular 31.8mm bars, it's safe to say the jury may still be out on that one too. 

Initially, the bike was built with a 31mm Renthal Apex stem and 25mm rise Black Label bar, with more spacers beneath the stem. I have since opted for a 40mm stem and placed it lower down the steerer with taller 38mm rise bars, enabling a much closer feel and shape that I was after from the bike and am very happy with the fit currently.


Race Face's Turbine Trigger Shifter

The Turbine dropper post with the shifter style lever is one of the most comfortable and easily initiated droppers I've ridden. 


Saddle choice is incredibly personal and currently, the Line from Fabric has been quite comfortable despite my having been off the bike for 10 weeks due to injury. The Race Face Turbine post is my preferred dropper to date, with the 175mm length being great and the smooth actuation thanks to the very well designed thumb trigger, the best I’ve experienced. This was mounted on a previous test bike around mid-summer last year and so far is still going strong, and as a result, I wanted it on the G16. Could I run a 200mm? Definitely, but I’m not sure that it’s needed—though I said the same thing when on a 150mm a couple of years ago…


Avid Code Calipers

BRAKES

Frankenstein Avid/SRAM Code  •  Extras: NSB 180–200mm Brake Adapter

These brakes have been hanging in my garage for upwards of four or five years now and after continually being disappointed with others for one reason or another, I decided to breathe some new life into them and use them on the GeoMetron. Why did I hang onto them to begin with? I had nothing but good memories using them. Reliable, little need to be serviced, and great stopping power—the lever feel is still one of my favourites too. By all accounts I hear, the new Code brakes offer the same experience but I didn’t want to spend the money if I didn’t need to.


Avid Code Calipers and NSB Brake Adapter

The galvanized Avid Code callipers from circa 2010 mated to a CNC brake adapter from Whistler's NSB. These work well and were gathering dust—now they have a purpose again. 

2014 Avid Code Brake Lever

A couple of years after getting the Codes my levers needed a service, but some friends at SRAM opted to replace them with the last model instead. No complaints here. 


After a much-needed rebuild—anything sitting for this long would need some love—the brakes were mounted up and have been working great. Stopping power is excellent and they’re always there when I need them. The only potential problem I foresee is finding replacement pads in the sintered variety, which I am seeing fewer of. Changing the pads is also a considerable struggle compared with more recent brakes.


It may not be any exquisite dream build like you may see elsewhere but to me, there’s no need to spend exorbitant amounts of money on parts that don’t really add up benefiting a rider. A few grams here or there aren’t worth the dollars if you get the same functionality for less and with the exception of the hubs I've stuck with this. I don’t know what the bike weighs anyway and I honestly don’t care, the ride is fantastic and I want to spend as little time wrenching on it as possible, which makes for more time riding. The quality of the frame and the attention to detail are very high and it pays off on the trail. This is the quietest bike I've ridden to date, both in terms of sound and trail manners.


External Cable head tube guides

I'm honestly excited to be running external cables again. I never had an issue with them before and they make working on the bike so much quicker.

G16 Downtube Cable Guide

The external cable routing is securely fastened with well placed and designed fixtures which aid in the bike's quiet ride. I borrowed some mastic tape to place between the cables and the frame, further deadening sounds.  


The GeoMetron range of bikes aren't so much the outliers they were even as recently as a couple of years ago. With brands like Pole, Starling Cycles, and Nicolai Bicycles (who also manufacture the GeoMetron for the brand) to name a few, also looking to place the rider in a position more central in the wheelbase. The goal is improved handling and confidence in a range of situations thanks to more comfort and greater traction. Read the reviews on any of these bikes and you will see that there is a reason a number of manufacturers are moving in this direction, only some more confidently than others.    

You can learn more about the GeoMetron G16 and the other bikes available on GeoMetron website.


Comments

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Jan. 7, 2018, 11:10 p.m.

If you are interested in progressive geometry there is a geometron thread on mtbr that is worth reading.

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
0
Tjaard Breeuwer  - Sept. 2, 2018, 6:47 a.m.

And if you are tall, here is a nice chart showing stack and reach for many of the biggest bikes available:

Reply

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Jan. 8, 2018, 4:05 a.m.

AJ - Thanks for the great write up on a great bike.  Out of interest how tall are you?

Reply

craw
+1 qivittoq
Cr4w  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:08 a.m.

I'm fascinated by this bike and the Pole. It seems like bikes are really poorly designed for taller riders. I've been looking at the XL Pole Evolink 158, which has comparably extreme geo. To my 6'6" those number make a lot of sense. I'd be interested to hear what were some of the bikes you had before and how they led you to the Geometron.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 Cr4w
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 8, 2018, 10:56 a.m.

Hey Cr4w. As far as trail bikes go, my recent jumps to bigger were the Transition Patrol, which I rode in a large, then sold and got an XL, then the Mondraker Dune I mentioned really cracked it open for me. At 6'6" there really isn't much from major manufacturers that would fit you, let alone the benefits other geometry highlights that these sort of bikes exhibit. You will not regret trying something like this, especially at your size.

Reply

qivittoq
+1 Cr4w
qivittoq  - Jan. 8, 2018, 11:41 a.m.

Sorry this triggered me and I urge you to dive in! At 6'4" with longish arms I have been where you are and it is not extreme geo, it is right sizing when you in this end of the scale. I have a Geometron with numbers and wheels very similar to a Pole XL and it is great not feeling cramped and have the room to move about.

Reply

T-mack
0
T-mack  - Jan. 8, 2018, 11:53 a.m.

At 6'4" Im on a L Evolink 140. You would be happy with the XL.

Reply

primoz-resman
0
Primož Resman  - Jan. 8, 2018, 1:28 p.m.

At 6'3", i'm not AS tall (i've been scraping along on a Large Reign 2015, which is too small though), but i too feel the pain, mainly due to the slack seat tubes (actual values, not effective, virtual values). Currently looking at what's on offer, i'm fairly certain i'll be springing for an XL Bird Aeris 145 (likely in the fresh LT guise), which is also a very long, slack bike when it comes to the front end, yet has a very steep (actual angle) seat tube. Compared to the Geometron and the Poles it is shorter and not as slack, but it's still out there :)

EDIT: should have replied Cr4w with this, didn't realize the replies are multilevel :/

Reply

jitenshakun
0
Jitensha Kun  - Jan. 8, 2018, 2:51 p.m.

My 6'4" comes with tall arms and my XL Reign has a longer stem, my dropper isn't slammed in the frame, and I can feel cramped at times.

I threw a leg over an XXL Santa Cruz Hightower and my first impression was it didn't feel like it needed a longer stem.  It was also the first bike my friends said I didn't look like a clown on.

Reply

bmak
0
bmak  - Jan. 15, 2018, 8:20 p.m.

How long is your stem on the XL Reign?

I have one too and I'm curious.

Reply

DangerousDave
0
DangerousDave  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:28 a.m.

Out of curiosity, what specifically about those grips helps you with your thumb/hand injury?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 8, 2018, 10:57 a.m.

Hey Dave. The mushroom portion on the inboard section of the grip provides a really nice cushion up against the area where my injury is. Other grips have a tendency to irritate the tendons there resulting in it flaring up again. Unfortunately, I haven't had much luck getting rid of it completely, despite lots of time off the bike since I first sustained the injury a couple of years ago.

Reply

lister_yu
0
lister_yu  - Jan. 8, 2018, 12:17 p.m.

Hi AJ, have you tried ESI grips? I struggled with grips vs. hands for years and ESI grips did the trick. There are more options (wolftooth, lizard skins etc.) availble and I guess any silicon grip with good thickness relative to your hand size does the trick.

...oh and bloody awesome bike :-)

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - Jan. 8, 2018, 12:57 p.m.

I've used ESI & Wolftooth silicone - they def. can't be beat in terms of cush / vibration damping. Due to lack of a gnarled grip surface, I don't care for them as much in sloppy season however. I'm also running Deathgrips (in the larger diameter) currently - and pretty happy with them. 

Also - rad bike, AJ. I've been following Porters' ruminations for a while - definitely intrigued by the new superstretched designs.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - Jan. 8, 2018, 8:35 p.m.

I'm a huge fan of the ESIs - and don't mind them in the wet/slop. Maybe depends on your glove of choice (or lack thereof?)

The PRO silicone compound is all wrong, though. 

I think with all the silicone grips, if you try 'em, they're love or hate. I'm clearly the former.

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - Jan. 8, 2018, 12:57 p.m.

If you have big hands this might not be the answer. I thought the big ESI would be awesome with such a big stated diameter (34mm!). Until I tried them. That material is so compressive that I could squeeze it basically to nothing. It was like they weren't even there.

Reply

primoz-resman
0
Primož Resman  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:38 p.m.

FWIW, though not sillicone, after running Superstar Excel grips (32 mm) i'm currently loving RF Gripplers in 33 mm as a longfingered guy.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 8, 2018, 1:46 p.m.

Hey lister_yu. I've ridden the Lizard Skins variation and wasn't a fan (pre-injury, mind you). I ride sans gloves and with the amount of moisture that we see in these parts, regardless of gloves or not, they just weren't right for me. Quite happy with the Deathgrip and the newer ODI's seem to be plenty comfortable for the thumb too.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - Jan. 8, 2018, 8:48 p.m.

FWIW, I think the ESIs are the only ones that have really nailed the silicone compound right. I do run gloves, and can see why grip in the wet might be an issue without... but with gloves, I haven't had any issues. 

At least not.... issues that were just my own fault. Look, its not my grips that make me slow. Or fall over.

Reply

jitenshakun
+4 Tjaard Breeuwer Cr4w Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas
Jitensha Kun  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:56 a.m.

At 6'4" I'm with Cr4W on this one. Slack bikes with proper reach have been missing from the market for ages - just ask any tall guy running a 80mm stem on an XL trail bike.

I appreciate that NSMB is spending some bandwidth on bikes that are offering something new to the market.

I've got a wonky wrist and getting up and off the wrists will likely help me out.  Currently geomoetry always has me reaching for the bar when pedaling and pushing back off the bar when in a descending (standing) position.  Sitting and standing neutrally on the bike will be worth trying out.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+3 AJ Barlas qivittoq Cr4w
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 8, 2018, 12:55 p.m.

We're finding it to be interesting to explore slightly different bikes, as well. Feedback like that is always appreciated, as is letting us know if there's are other things of interest - even if it strays a little outside the traditional boundaries we've normally stuck to. Let us know your fetishes!

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - Jan. 8, 2018, 1:03 p.m.

It seems like we are entering a new phase of boutique mad scientist bikes, like in the 90s.

Reply

cooperquinn
+2 Cr4w Skyler
Cooper Quinn  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:22 p.m.

WHICH IS SO AWESOME.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - Jan. 8, 2018, 9:22 p.m.

WHICH IS SO AWESOME.

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - Jan. 9, 2018, 8:46 a.m.

so terribly awesome.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+1 Pete Roggeman
Jerry Willows  - Jan. 8, 2018, 6:34 p.m.

Pete...  take a look at Starling Cycles.  Really interesting.  Builder/Designer used to work in the aerospace industry as a carbon engineer but ended making steel FS bikes.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 9, 2018, 8:25 a.m.

It's such a cool story how Joe started Starling. We shared a video highlighting how it started a little while ago: https://nsmb.com/articles/the-passion-behind-starling-cycles/

Reply

LWK
0
LWK  - Jan. 8, 2018, 10:10 a.m.

I'd also be curious how tall you are - Nicolai has height recommendations in their geometry chart but Mojo doesn't.  

I agree with your comments about focusing on parts functionality, etc.  But, this is not exactly a cheap frame.  I dont believe there is a distributor in NA?  and so one is looking at over $5K for the frame from Mojo? 

an overall ride or test report at some point would also be great.  You indicate that overall its fantastic but would be great to know its strengths/weaknesses.  Just by the geometry, I assume its better at steep and rowdy and less so in tight or flat but that is an assumption.

great read, thx!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 8, 2018, 10:52 a.m.

@fartymarty @LWK I'm around 191cm but with shorter legs. I opted for the Longest despite testing the Extra Longest because I wanted more clearance when on the bike (again, shorter legs) and wasn't as concerned with all-out speed. If I were chasing race results I would have gone with Extra Longest and dealt with it, but I'm not, so the size down was my choice. Very happy with the decision. Hope this helps. There's a lot of discussion in the MTBR and Singletracks forums about the bikes and sizing does get discussed in there too.

Reply

JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - Jan. 8, 2018, 1:09 p.m.

ok, i'll add to the tall guy geek out. at 6 5 or 195cm i'm tickled with the 'new' gen bikes. i say 'new' as in 2015 Transition sizing, they are substantially longer again now. i have xl Patrol and Smuggler and while i definitely want to try the new one's and bikes like Mondraker and others, i don't feel what i'm riding now is small at all. i feel there will be a negative tradeoff at some point.

Reply

Xorrox
0
Brad_xyz  - Jan. 8, 2018, 2:40 p.m.

I'll be interested to hear how this performs on tight techy north shore trails and how hard it is to ride on any of the remaining north shore skinnies.   Obviously it should work well at high speed, but I'd be worried about some of the slow tech riding.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 9, 2018, 8:37 a.m.

So far it hasn't presented any problems on tight sections of trail on the Shore. The shape has actually made it easier to hit tight corners where normally you get a little feedback on the front wheel, with it trying to tuck under whenever hitting obstacles in the corner. I've found this to allow for a more relaxed technique through such corners and sections of trail on the G16 and am yet to find a drawback that wouldn't be the same on a more common geometry. Skinnies would likely be an issue, exaggerated by my lack of practice. I generally avoid them at all costs. :)

Reply

Kelownarider
0
Kelownarider  - Jan. 8, 2018, 3:20 p.m.

Does it manual reasonably well? More or the same effort to lift the front wheel (I would assume more given weight-forward position)? Does this make is more exaggerated to lift and hop at slower speeds? Thanks!

Reply

kcam
0
kcam  - Jan. 8, 2018, 11:31 p.m.

I've got a G13 and it doesn't manual too well, may just be my bad technique though.

As far as lifting and hopping goes, I'm more willing to do so at faster speeds due to the gobs of stability that I'm afforded with this bike. I find myself willing to do more jumps and other risky stuff because I know I'll be coming out ok, with the bike saving my ass more than a few times already.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 9, 2018, 8:32 a.m.

Yes. The extra longest required a little more effort to get it started but I found it easier to hold than my previous bikes. On the trail (out of corners etc.) it required a more concentrated effort, but once comfortable on the bike it would have been no big deal. The first ride on the longest presented no issues and it manualled out of corners etc. with no extra thought. On flats/roads it was easy. I don't find it holds back any dynamic trail movements like lifting and hopping when at slower speeds. It's actually quite a lively ride.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - Jan. 8, 2018, 4:42 p.m.

I'm 1.75m in height with a tip to tip wingspan of approx. the same length.  I went with a Longer (medium) MOJO G16 as per MOJOs recommendations.  My bike is buried in one of the build threads; but is the 175mm 29er variety.  

So far this experiment has proven to be a success in my experience.  I spent many days and nights debating if this frame would be the correct on for myself.  It was no small chunk of change to throw at a frame that I've never ridden, let alone seen in the flesh.  Most all other über-frames come in at around the same cost as a G16 with comparable shock.  Besides  a few frames, they'd all be blind purchases as well.

Reply

kcam
0
kcam  - Jan. 8, 2018, 11:29 p.m.

I'm 1.78m and I've got a longest (large) Nicolai G13! Was really concerned it was going to be too large for me but I love the extra stability it gives. 

Same experience as AJ, the stability in corners is amazing

Reply

JLantz
0
Justin Lantz  - Jan. 8, 2018, 5:20 p.m.

What an exciting bike. I'm looking forward to reading more about your experiences on it, AJ. 

Sort of a silly question; can you ride it no-handed?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 9, 2018, 8:40 a.m.

Funny enough, Justin, it's pretty warranted. It does require a little extra effort to balance no-handed. You're taking away a lot of the shape that the bike is ridden in when you sit straight up, so it's not relevant in how it rides when you're in position, but something that is a little interesting and had me thinking for a moment when first noticed.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - May 20, 2018, 11:43 a.m.

Is your G16 a track stand fiend?

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - May 20, 2018, 11:43 a.m.

Is your G16 a track stand fiend?

Reply

goose8
0
goose8  - Jan. 8, 2018, 7:04 p.m.

I really like these sorts of articles featuring personal rigs. It's neat to see the frame you chose and hear about why, but I also appreciate the inside info on the components too and why they work for you. Keep them coming!

Reply

badIuck
0
badIuck  - Jan. 9, 2018, 10:04 a.m.

Do you not have any problems with denting the rims? I find them to be quite prone to dents..

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.

Trending on NSMB