Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano
Product Review

Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Words Cam McRae
Photos Cam McRae
Date Oct 15, 2018

Sealant sucks. It gets all over everything and it often stinks. But it sucks less than flat tires so I soldier on. Lately I've been installing and changing so many tires I've left a towel on the floor of my shop to use as a mop under my shoe to clean up all the spilled spooge. There are less messy ways to dispense the stuff, but I always seem to spill. 

Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Sealant is likely the big seller, but both companies produce several other products. These pouches are handy and can be reused. Peaty's holds 120ml while the Effetto Mariposa holds 60ml. The EM pouch comes with a short tube to help dispense the goop while the Peaty's version threads on and is designed to be refillable. 

I'm sure German publications have figured out a way to do science with sealant. They can probably give you a measurement in some obscure units that determine which is superior down to the third decimal place. Or they could puncture a bunch of tires and see how they perform, which isn't such a bad plan, unless you have an issue with wasting good rubber, as I do.  

peatys_effetto_mariposa_2.jpg

I'm giving the edge to the Peaty's 38mm valves (right) because they look sweet, are a little lighter, and include a core wrench in the form of a valve cap. MSRP 25 USD. I also prefer the look of black valves and Peaty's will warranty these for as long as you have them. The EM valves also measure 38mm and pairs include a valve core tool and red anodized valve covers (not pictured). MSRP is a very reasonable 15 USD.

Instead my methodology was to use the two brands of gunk for my regular riding over a period of months to see if I could see any difference. Until recently there wasn't much to go on because they both failed me once and the rest of the time they did the job well enough for me to not notice them, which also means neither clogged my valves. In fact lasted long enough without me having a puncture, to give each a thumbs up. 

Peaty's sealant valiantly attempts to avoid the use of ammonia, because it's harmful to the natural world, but there is also glitter in there to provide larger particles to plug holes. I asked Tom Makin of Peaty's and he told me the glitter they use is biodegradable. I have no way of verifying this (no reason to doubt it either) but a quick web search reveals that plant-based glitter is readily available.

peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Beyond valves and sealant, Peaty's makes lube, cleaner (15 USD for 1 litre) and degreaser (20 USD for 1 litre), each with an eye on the environment. I've been using all three and they are very effective. I particularly like Linklube (10 GBP MSRP), which separates into two components, with blue on the bottom, as seen in the image. A quick shake mixes things up properly. The oil on top is designed to penetrate and drive out moisture leaving the "secret sauce" behind to lubricate. The applicator is also one of the best I've used, with a convenient top that opens and closes with a twist. 

Effetto Mariposa (which translates to butterfly effect) is a Swiss company that makes what they call 'technical cycling products,' and sealant was one one of their first releases. Like Peaty's, Caffelatex sealant is ammonia free and contains particulate, in this case silicate. Effetto Mariposa takes a different approach however, using microscopic particles, meaning less than 2 microns in diameter, which shouldn't clog your valves. They even make a syringe that allows you to pump fluid in through your presta valve, without removing the core. In theory at least. 

peatys_effetto_mariposa_1.jpg

When it works well the Effetto Mariposa syringe is a thing of beauty. Unfortunately I haven't had consistent luck with it. At first it worked flawlessly but since it's been inconsistent. I have been careful about keeping it clean and free of clogs but the through-the-valve approach, with core attached, hasn't been reliable. I'd love to see a second connection that threads onto the valve with the core removed but one is not included. At times the hose comes loose from the syringe end and sprays sealant everywhere as well. Despite this I find it very useful to measure and dispense fluid even if I decide not to go through the valve. 

I have had mixed results with sealant. I've had several holes which I felt should be easily plugged that would not seal. In some cases the sealant was a little old but in others there was a good volume of fresh gunk in my tire. 

The most recent one was a small puncture near the sidewall that produced a very slow leak. I had relatively recently added 90ml of Peaty's sealant but the small puncture would not seal. I tried to shake the sealant down to the point where the puncture was and leave it over night, to no avail. I opened up the tire and found that the sealant was clinging to the inside of the tire, which is good, but so much was clinging that there was no sealant that could be sloshed around to the area where the puncture was. A case of reduced sealant motility. And any that did slosh around failed to plug the wee hole. Normally I'd fix a small hole once I got home, with a vulcanizing patch on the inside and some shoe goo on the outside, but this one was in a bad spot near the bead. It was too small to see so plugs seemed like a bad idea as well. Instead I cleaned out the Peaty's sealant and gave the competing product a chance. 

Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Manoeaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Effetto Mariposa also makes a particulate you can add to the mixture. It's said this will speed sealing and plug larger holes. A downside is that everything will likely dry out more quickly. I would be inclined to scoop some of this in for more adventurous rides or in particularly nasty terrain.  Standard Effetto Mariposa sealant also is meant to foam up once the wheel stars moving to disperse the product evenly. 

peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

The Effetto Mariposa torque wrench is the nicest I have used. The one-way ratcheting head is smooth and precise and an audible click makes it clear when you have reached the selected rating. 

peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

A dial easily adjusts the torque value you are looking for, in Newton metres. Unfortunately it's quite difficult to read for those over 35. 

peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

This particular version of Effetto Mariposa's torque wrench is the Giustaforza II 2-16 Pro Anniversary Racheting version, which comes in this tidy case. MSRP is steep at 280 USD but you can purchase a non-ratcheting version without bits (which you can pick up for a song) for a little over 100 USD on sale on the web right now. 

Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Manoeaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Another issue is that the 4mm, 5mm and T25 bits are long, which makes it difficult reach higher torque values. I'm not sure what utility there is to having 10 cm bits when there is an extended driver option, but this makes stripping fittings much more likely and it makes the mechanism feel cheap and loose. Maybe it's a road bike thing? I would immediately chuck these in favour of standard short bits. 

The EM sealant sealed the small hole I mentioned above and has held fast for more than a week, after several rides, and seems to be a permanent fix. Another way to distinguish between the two goops is mess. Peaty's fluid is a blue that is almost fluorescent. Add the glitter, that can dry and stick to anything it comes in contact with, and it's a an OCD nightmare. If you get to it quickly it rinses off easily, but when it dries it requires some elbow grease. Because the Peaty's wasn't completely fresh this isn't a perfect comparison, but I would have expected this hole to seal on the trail despite the difficult location. 

peatys_motility2.jpg

Good cling from Peaty's sealant..

peatys_motility1.jpg

but not enough motility to get to where an issue has occurred. Adding a little extra (I used the recommended 90ml) is likely the way forward. 

Peaty's Sealant VS. Effetto Mariposa - Mano a Mano

Both these companies have put more thought than most into the nasty business of setting up tubeless tires and keeping them running. 

An added bonus of avoiding ammonia is that neither sealant stinks. I wouldn't want to bathe in either, but these are much less scary than most of the competition. 

Peaty's has taken a more realistic approach to adding sealant after the tire is fitted by including a simple tube that connects the bottle to the valve once the core has been removed. The EM syringe is amazing when it works, but until I figure out why it sometimes fails it's not much help. 

Peaty's Sealant is 40 USD for a litre while you can find Effetto Mariposa for 38 USD. And both do an admirable job. If you don't mind adding a little extra, you may find Peaty's suits your needs just fine, but if you like to keep the gunk in your tire to a minimum Effetto Mariposa might be the way forward. 

Check Peaty's products here

Effetto Mariposa here.

Comments

GladePlayboy
0
Rob Gretchen  - Oct. 15, 2018, 6:15 a.m.

Interesting... but Stan's Race Sealant FTW... not sure why anybody would anything else.. plugs seriously large cuts.   Its the go to in our shop after seeing all the others that don't work well.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 15, 2018, 8:06 a.m.

Doesn't it contain ammonia Rob? It certainly smells like it does and Stan's suggests that "any trace amount of ammonia in Stan’s sealant will evaporate soon after it is injected into the tire," which doesn't give me too much confidence. Not only is it nasty stuff for foliage and critters, it's what makes the stuff stink. That's two reasons for me. Ammonium hydroxide is corrosive and nasty for skin etc. without even getting started on the impact a spill in the woods may have.

Reply

GladePlayboy
0
Rob Gretchen  - Oct. 15, 2018, 5:27 p.m.

Hey Cam.. I downloaded the safety data sheet for Stan's and could not find "ammonia" or "Ammonium hydroxide" listed as an ingredient... it did list propolene glycol which is apparently safe.   Perhaps  there is more information out there?    I have had very little issue with evaporation as you put it...  I have seen it form small balls inside the tire.   And of course spewing sealant on foliage, etc.. is not cool...

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 15, 2018, 11:23 p.m.

My quote was from the FAQ on Stan's website, and I have smelled the noxious ammonia smell in the past, so I guess more research is needed.

Reply

Lornholio
0
Lornholio  - Oct. 16, 2018, 2:13 a.m.

I emailed Stan's a few years back to ask if it's OK to dump sealant at the side of a trail if fitting a tube, from an environmental viewpoint.  They replied yes no problem, non-toxic, etc.  Looking at the front of a bottle I bought this summer it does indeed state "Non hazardous, non-corrosive, non-toxic".

Reply

Sethimus
0
Sethimus  - Oct. 21, 2018, 3:28 a.m.

thankfully no NH3 is ever released in natural cycles, ever had biology or chemistry in school? i suggest you look again at the nitrogen cycle, especially the nitrogen fixation...

Reply

Sethimus
0
Sethimus  - Oct. 21, 2018, 3:26 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

scoleman
0
SColeman  - Oct. 15, 2018, 12:29 p.m.

I've noticed that the Stans Race sealant tends to congeal the particles into little "cotton balls" very quickly, leaving nothing behind to seal the holes.  I've tried a few different things and just keep coming back to regular old Stans.  Orange Seal will do in a pinch as well.

Reply

tehllama42
0
Tehllama42  - Oct. 16, 2018, 12:48 p.m.

I've found Orange seal slightly outperforms basic Stan's, but that's in a more desert environment out here.  I think the difference comes to it performing a touch better as it dries out and gradually fails, whereas Stan's is great-great-great-instantly dessicated and then I'm walking.

Reply

goose8
+1 Cam McRae
goose8  - Oct. 15, 2018, 2:36 p.m.

I’ve had good luck with trucker co cream. Easy cleanup, doesn’t stink, seals pretty well, even in cold weather. I’d be interested to hear how it stacks up to the two products reviewed here.

Reply

pedalhound
0
pedalhound  - Oct. 16, 2018, 8:43 a.m.

I used to use normal Stans and it was okay...not great. Earlier this year when I built up my Chromag, I tried the Finish line sealant...and it did not get along well with my Conti TK's with hookless rims, probably mostly to do with the tires but when I took them apart they were dry and this was only after a few months. On one ride I had to stop and pump up my tires 4-5 times...no holes in the tires either. It was easy to clean the Finish Line out though, so that was good. I then went to Orange Seal as I heard it really does a good job of coating the inside of the tires/rims with latex and since I changed over have not had to touch the pump hardly at all.

Reply

tehllama42
+1 Cam McRae
Tehllama42  - Oct. 16, 2018, 12:47 p.m.

I totally agree that trying to recuscitate old worn out tires is probably the best acid test for sealant performance - Orange seal seems to be the leader in my experience has a slight edge, unless I go with double the amount of homebrew, in which case it's a wash.
Orange seal never comes out, but it does play nicely with other sealants, and actually does a great job of being the first sealant pass.  If money was no object, fresh Minion day would also come with Orange Seal, then I'd run whatever else after that based on ease of adding more and lifetime in dry hot desert climates.

Reply

tehllama42
0
Tehllama42  - Oct. 16, 2018, 12:45 p.m.

For all the hassle and effort, I've been equally disappointed with each sealant I've tried.  Since this includes the basic homebrew stuff (triple the mess, but 1/3 of the price), I just go with that.  
The only areas near me that feel like I'd make any appreciable ecological impact with the odd ounce of bike tire sealant are all wilderness areas replete with horse turds along each trail, so that isn't a driving decision point for sealant to me.
Cornbread and pepper are solid additives for sealing stuff up, but there are always going to be limitations when trying to seal up 6 year old Maxxis Asspen tires that somehow have immaculate bald tread areas but keep failing specatularly at the sidewalls.

Reply

12snap
+1 Cam McRae
12snap  - Oct. 16, 2018, 1:34 p.m.

I had that same syringe from Effeto Mariposa.  I removed the piece that threads on and just slid the hose over the valve stem with the core removed to inject the sealant.  The hose is a tight enough fit that there's no mess.  Just make sure you clean out the syringe after every use.  I forgot to do that once and the sealant residue dried up leaving me unable to move the plunger.  I eventually broke it trying to get it free.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 17, 2018, 1:13 p.m.

I tried that as well but wasn't as happy as I'd like to be about the connection - and I had it slide off. Maybe I'll give it another go.

Reply

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