Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM
2 Minute Review

Orange Seal - VersaValves Tubeless Valve Stems

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Oct 13, 2017

High Volume

Orange Seal Cycling's new VersaValves tubeless valve stems are a why-didn't-I-think-of-that level product. Orange Seal removed the rubber rim gasket molded to the end of the stem and mounted it externally. Inner diameter is maximized for improved air flow and decrease potential for clogs in one simple product.

Compared to a Stan's (or standard) valve stem the increased air flow is significant. 

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

The rim gasket slides over the valve stem. The rest is a standard tubeless valve system. 

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

Swappable rim-valve gaskets to accomodate different rim profiles. 

Orange Seals current valve stems - the RVC-  aren't anything to write home about.* The most obvious difference is the permanently attached rim gasket of the old versus the swappable gaskets of the new.

The Package

My favourite detail of the VersaValve package is the extra set of valve cores. There's also a plastic core removal tool and two different gasket profiles.

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

The package. Extra valve cores are a nice bonus. 

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

The packaging. 

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

Another thoughtful little feature: the valve nut tightens down with a 9mm wrench. 

Simple in design and execution. Faster to air up. Less prone to clogging. Easier to clean out.  I'll be surprised if most** companies hawking valve stems don't eventually transition to a similar design.

Orange Seal Tubeless Valve Stem AndrewM

Ready to roll. 

Estimated MSRPs for VersaValves... 

32,48mm $23.99

60,80mm $25.99

More information and pricing will be available soon at Orange Seal Cycling. 

*The RVC version is still available in many retailers while the new version will be available sometime this month (Oct. 2017)

**Most: e13's two piece alloy valve stems are awesome - though pricey - as well. 

Comments

DemonMike
+1
mike  - Oct. 13, 2017, 5:41 a.m.

Battling stem leak issues right now , these I will have to take a closer look at . I am amazed that with the tubeless theme today that no one has designed a stem similar to automotive use .  Pull thru design ,self sealing with no nut to tighten up .

Reply

Endur-Bro
+1
Endur-Bro  - Oct. 13, 2017, 8:14 a.m.

I'm surprised no one is selling a moto stem system; but then "lightweight" is 99.5% of cycling marketing shtick...

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 13, 2017, 8:51 a.m.

Is your tape all good? In the shop 95% of the tubeless valve issues we’d see was the tape being torn or otherwise damaged at the valve interface.

Legacy fitment concerns, pumps, different internal rim profiles, the need to be able to seat MTB tires, how much can you charge - lots of factors I guess in terms of making a big leap? 

The Orange Seal and e13 valves both seal really well - assuming tape is good - and move a lot of air with the cores out.

e13 tried to climb out of the box and their system is a bit more money and maybe a bit large - no issues though and I’m running them on my own bike and a test bike. 

These NEW Orange Seal valves are a really well thought out take on the standard valve. I’d be surprised if anyone wasn’t happy with them.

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Oct. 13, 2017, 10:10 a.m.

I was stoked to see the innovative e13 stems and got a pair. Unfortunately they do not play well with any of my Lezyne pumps and pump heads so I will be removing them. Look forward to checking out these Orange Seal ones.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 13, 2017, 10:17 a.m.

It’s funny... I have a few pumps and I grab my Leyzne mountain floor pump first when airing up the e13 stems. 

The pump head doesn’t thread on to the valve body but it seals fine if I hold it against the valve and I find it really fast to add air. 

Maybe it doesn’t work with the lower volume Lezyne pumps?

...

That said, the Orange Seal stems are standard layout and dimension so you’ll have zero compatibility stress there.

Reply

ac
0
Ac  - Oct. 13, 2017, 9:13 p.m.

Do both the E13 stem and the Orange stay tight without loosening up periodically unlike stans valves?

Does the E13 also provide extra air flow like the Orange?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1
Andrew Major  - Oct. 13, 2017, 11:13 p.m.

Zero issue with either coming loose if we’re talking valve stems (bodies). The e13 uses a hex key (internal) and the O-S uses a box wrench (external) which is clean. 

I don’t have issues with Stan’s coming loose - I use vice grips. But definitely not as clean.

If you’re talking valve cores they all can come loose especially if you use a thread on pump like Lezyne. The e13 valve cap is a stem tightener which is cool. The Orange Seal (and Schwalbe) valves come with a little plastic tool to throw in your tools. Some - not all - chainbreakers can be used to tighten valves and I carry a Leatherman usually as well.

If valve cores come loose regularly on you a dab of blue loctite on the threads will probably make you happy. 

.

Valve cores can be a PIA to acquire - and now that so many people run tubeless robbing your friend’s flat tubes isn’t an option - and they’re the wear item in the tubeless valve set. To my knowledge Orange Seal are the only company that includes spares.

.

*edit: Mis-read your question sorry. e13 has really impressive air flow. 

For the record I’m at peace with my level of bike-nerdiness... I reviewed those too here.

I’ve been really happy with both products but - guesstimating what the O-S will sell for - I would probably buy the Orange Seal valves for my own bikes simply because the performance and quality is equitable to me and that means they’re a better value. I reserve the right to take that back if they’re more $ than I’d guess.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - Oct. 13, 2017, 11:37 p.m.

Shwalbe sells valve cores separately.  They also include the top cap and crappy little tool.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 13, 2017, 11:45 p.m.

The e13 top cap/tool is definitely nicer - although my chainbreaker is the most reliably with-me option. 

The plastic doo-dads work fine but certainly don’t last if used frequently. Actually surprised most multitools don’t have a valve tool. Not sure why a regular plastic valve cap is notable - every valve stem comes with them I think?

Yes, Stan’s sells cores as well. More meant I can never buy one when I need one - nice to have spares included with the valves.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - Oct. 14, 2017, 9:57 a.m.

I don't know, first time I've bought valve cores.  I'm certain the planet is overrun with loose valve stem caps by now though.

Reply

ac
0
Ac  - Oct. 14, 2017, 10:01 a.m.

If your bike shop has a tub of trashed tubes some of the presta tubes have removable cores for the taking.

jan
0
Jan  - Oct. 17, 2017, 11:35 p.m.

These seem like a great improvement over the first gen valve stems that orange seal brought to market. Also, thems nipples is fancy.

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