oneup 240mm dropper post2.jpeg
Review / Product Intro

OneUp Introduces The Longest (240mm!) Dropper

Words Cam McRae
Photos Cam McRae
Date Feb 1, 2022
Reading time

The first dropper post, the Hite Rite, had an enormous drop of 1 1/2 inches, but longer models that allowed 2 1/2 and 4 1/2 inches soon followed. Introduced by Joe Breeze and Josh Angell, the Hite Rite was simply a spring that attached to the quick release lever on your seat clamp and then around your post. Riders were already dropping their saddles on the fly by pinching the nose between their thighs and opening the QR before putting some pressure down, but raising it was trickier, which was where the spring came in. It also had the benefit of keeping your saddle pointing in the right direction.

HiteRite-Ad-B.jpg

We've come a long way since the Hite Rite.

The next development on my radar came from a patent owned by North Shore local who licensed his design for a two-piece telescoping seat post to Titec. The Scoper post had an extra quick release and it had almost as much drop as it had extension. This allowed proper climbing height for bikes with interrupted seat tubes while also getting the saddle out of the way for the descent. It was fine if you were grinding up the climb on a DH bike because you probably needed a rest at the top anyway. And then came the Gravity Dropper followed by the orginal Reverb, which dropped a total of 125mm. And at the time I was convinced it was enough.

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Titec's scoper was the first telescoping post I used, and it was a huge benefit for the riding we were doing on the North Shore at the time.

Since then, each and every time a longer dropper post has arrived on the scene I have been skeptical about any benefit, but each one has improved my riding. I'm not NBA tall or anything but I have long legs so my saddle runs high for the frame size I normally choose. When 150mm became a thing I liked it but didn't think I need to go further. I sang the same tune for 175, 200, and 210mm of dropper travel. I spent some time on a prototype 225 from Bike Yoke and felt like I'd met my match, but I was still eager to try a 240, having finally learned my lesson.

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I've been accused of compensating before... Like all OneUp posts, the 240 has the shortest stack of available droppers and a short overall length considering all that drop. OneUp 180mm posts have a shorter overall length than 170mm droppers from most other brands.

Installation was as smooth and simple as expected for a OneUp dropper, with one exception. In order to keep my housing length reasonable with such a long post I had to detach the lever and feed the housing almost all the way into the frame to attach the cable. Once that was done, it was game on. The post was as smooth and trouble-free as any of the OneUp posts I've used in the past. After a few rides there was no excess play or binding in either direction. The trademark low stack height allowed me to run the post at full drop on my Yeti SB150, but I tried the same on a WeAreOne Arrival and couldn't quite get enough insertion.

Once I got to descending I realized I had finally met my match. While 240mm of drop got the post entirely out of the way, the added clearance was no longer beneficial. Too much clearance for me can make buzzing my rear tire with my ass a little too convenient and it also makes sitting down for a moment's rest less comfortable. Luckily OneUp had me covered.

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These shims are all that is required to reduce the travel of a OneUp post by either 10 or 20mm. I chose 20mm but I may end up going back to 10. A set of replacement shims can be purchased for 13.50 CAD if needed for some reason.

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Just slide them into the three grooves, (one per groove for 10mm drop and two for 20mm) close things back up and you are golden.

I'd never tackled the travel adjust feature of a OneUp post but I assumed it was straightforward. In fact it was ridiculously straightforward. I assumed I would at least have to remove the post and use the odd tool but I was mistaken. In fact it's probably more difficult to reduce the travel with the post out of the frame without gravity holding the shims in place. All that is involved in the entire process is unscrewing the collar by hand, extending the post to expose the channels where the shims reside, inserting either 3 or 6 shims (for 10 and 20mm of drop respectively), and then screwing the collar back on by hand. You'd have to make an effort for the task take more than 5 minutes and it could easily be done trailside, but I'm not sure why you'd ever want to. Now that the 240 has dropped down to 220mm, it seems that's my Goldilocks zone. It's more comfortable sitting on the dropped saddle and I'm less apt to grate my rear with rubber knobs, which can be somewhat unsettling. While 240 didn't get me any added benefit over 220, there will be many riders who appreciate all that space, particularly those taller than my 6'/183cm (albeit with a 35" inseam - Ed).

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I hadn't used OneUp's updated V2 actuator and I was impressed. Rather than just two holes to adjust how far inboard your lever will sit, OneUp added a third.

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The cartridge bearing in the V2 lever makes for very light action. This design will integrate with SRAM Matchmaker X, Shimano I-Spec EV and I-Spec II to reduce the number of clamps on your bars.

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OneUp never misses details. Rather than the industry standard 2.5mm hex head for the cable fixing bolt, OneUp uses a 3mm. Mechanics everywhere will be giving them a high five.

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You may be wondering where the insanity will end, and for now this is it. Jon Staples, the engineering mastermind at OneUp, has done all he can: "We are at the upper limit of the V2 chassis, I can't get any more length without a more sweeping redesign. Whether a 270mm is in the cards for the next generation, you'll have to wait and see." On my Yeti, the 240mm post needed to be inserted as far as possible for me to use all 240mm, but it worked. If you'd like to see if the post will work for your set up, you can use OneUp's Dropper length calculator.

The drive for the longer post, like many OneUp projects, was internal. Quinn Lanzon, who does marketing at OneUp, is a tall fellow and his response to the new post was unequivocal: "Before 240, I had to manually drop my post before pretty much every descent. Now, I don't have to and it's amazing, absolute game changer. I can't believe people have been riding around without this for years!" I know a few riders in the same boat. Another improvement, which has been found in all posts shipped in the last six months, is a new secondary seal for the air chamber to prevent pressure from seeping out prematurely. The 240 also has 15% more bushing overlap than the 210mm post to accommodate the extra leverage of all that drop. And finally, OneUp has added a 90mm post for diminutive riders or those who don't need much drop. Both posts can be ordered now.

OneUp Dropper V2 240mm

NEW FEATURES

  • Increased bushing overlap (240)
  • Sealed cartridge cap (on all posts)

CARRYOVER FEATURES

  • Travel adjust shims allow you to dial in your perfect length
  • Reliable sealed cartridge internals
  • User replaceable cartridge $69.50 USD
  • Light weight (shorter total length means less material and less weight for a given drop)
  • Easy to service at home
  • 2-year warranty

SPECS

  • Price: 90mm $199.50 USD / 240mm $229.50 USD / Remote $59.50 USD
  • Weight (30.9): 90mm: 377g / 240mm: 648g / Remote: 41g
  • (31.6): 90mm: 388g / 240mm: 668g
  • (34.9): 240mm: 812g
  • Overall length: 635 mm
  • Max Insertion: 340mm at full diameter (+15mm for actuator)
cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 170lbs/77kg

Inseam - 34"/86cm

Ape Index - 0.986

Age - 56

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Boogieman

Bar Width - 760mm

Preferred Reach - 485-500mm (longer with 27.5 wheels than 29)

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Comments

just6979
Justin White
8 months ago
+3 Cam McRae Tjaard Breeuwer Angu58

I'm slightly surprised they're making it in the narrower diameters. That's a LOT of extension on a pretty thin tube.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
8 months ago
+2 IslandLife bushtrucker

I might be worried if it was another company but I have confidence in the engineering behind OneUp products. It helps that they ride hard and build products for themselves. And while I see the merits of 34.9 for an application like this, it comes at a cost: 800 grams!

Reply

BenHD
BenHD
8 months ago
+3 IslandLife Lu Kz Cr4w

240 mm of Alabama blacksnake, too beaucoup?

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
8 months ago
0

We'll be like jolly green giants, riding the earth...

Reply

Zowsch
Zowsch
8 months ago
+3 Pete Roggeman Cam McRae Geof Harries

Reggie Miller eagerly awaiting the 440mm version

Reply

bushtrucker
bushtrucker
8 months ago
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman

Great little summary Cam. I started with a 185mm Revive on my hardtail thinking that would be plenty but upgraded to the 213mm version as soon as they hit the market. About 10mm off full insertion so that seems to be the max for me. I'm also 183cm  with a 35" inseam so based on your feedback it's nice to know that I'm probably not missing out on the longer ones. Oh and I will be paying extra attention to your future reviews now!

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
Tjaard Breeuwer
8 months ago
+2 Cam McRae Bogey

Can you get some details on the 34.9mm version? Is it just a thicker lower tube, or is the upper larger diameter? Any other changes (both for durability and to justify the extra weight)

Reply

oneupcomponents
oneupcomponents
8 months ago
+2 Cam McRae Tjaard Breeuwer

The 34.9mm posts uses the same upper tube as 30.9/31.6mm. This also means that it shares all service/rebuild parts. I hope that helps.

Reply

bogey
Bogey
8 months ago
+3 bushtrucker Lu Kz Vik Banerjee

This is a big miss IMO. I’m sure you guys know it, but a 34.9mm post can be made lighter and stiffer when designed to use the 34.9mm OD of the lower tube. 

As a tall and heavy rider I immediately appreciated the larger diameter upper tube on my XFusion 34.9mm dropper that came stock on my Stumpjumper EVO. It only has 190mm drop but I can easily feel the extra stiffness of the larger diameter tube over previous droppers that I used. It’s almost as if the seat tube angle is a touch steeper when climbing and there is definitely less bounce as the post flexes. I honestly won’t buy a 34.9 post without a larger diameter upper tube.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
8 months ago
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer

It isn't quite that simple. A little more info from OneUp about this:

" The upper tube remains the same for 34.9mm. We chose commonality of service parts over the weight reduction of a dedicated chassis. 

The big advantage we have over guys like Bike Yoke who do a 34.9mm dedicated version is that our upper tube has a 26mm diameter (instead of 25mm). That means for a given upper tube ID, our upper tube can be ~30-35% stronger than a 25mm version. They are further constrained by the hydraulics running directly on the upper tube ID so increasing the wall thickness requires an entire hydraulic design."

Reply

trumpstinyhands
trumpstinyhands
8 months ago
0

On the plus side, the collar on the 34.9 post is super thin so you get the maximum amount of drop for the length of the post. That might be a moot point with 240mm drop though!

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
Tjaard Breeuwer
7 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Thanks for the reply. In that case, wouldn’t I be better off just getting a 30.9 and using a shim(one is actually include with my Stumpy Evo frame)? I haven’t weighed the shim yet, but it has to less than 162 grams.

Any reason you’d recommend the thicker one?

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
7 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I'll leave that to the OneUp folks!

Reply

oneupcomponents
oneupcomponents
7 months, 3 weeks ago
0

30.9mm post with a 2mm shim is a great option for bikes with 34.9mm seat tubes. This will save you a significant amount of weight. However, we can understand that some people don't like the thought of using a shim & that's why we make posts in all 3 popular diameters.

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
Tjaard Breeuwer
7 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Thanks for the reply. In that case, wouldn’t I be better off just getting a 30.9 and using a shim(one is actually include with my Stumpy Evo frame)? I haven’t weighed the shim yet, but it has to less than 162 grams.

Any reason you’d recommend the thicker one?

Reply

JakeRedrum
JakeRedrum
8 months ago
+2 Cam McRae trumpstinyhands

I never had to bleed my Hite Rite.

Reply

craw
Cr4w
8 months ago
0

You also never got to enjoy a product that actually worked well.

Reply

JakeRedrum
JakeRedrum
7 months, 3 weeks ago
0

It was bleeding-edge technology at the time!

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
8 months ago
+1 Cam McRae

Damn, this would probably fit my hardtail, and the 210 in there is only a couple of months old.

I don't Need it, but I surely Want it.

Reply

craw
Cr4w
8 months ago
+1 Bogey

I'm often surprised by how low some people bury their seats to descend. At its lowest point I still need to be able to lean into my saddle to steer.

Reply

bogey
Bogey
7 months, 4 weeks ago
0

This comment has been removed.

bogey
Bogey
7 months, 4 weeks ago
0

@cr4w, I’m with you 100% on this. Maybe I don’t ride steep enough trails on the Shore or maybe I’m more old school but I just don’t want my saddle completely out of the way. I use my saddle to stabilize and steer my bike with the inside of my knees. On rough trails it adds another touch point along with my hands and feet.

This is also why I dislike bikes with super slack actual seat tube angles. At full drop of a 200mm dropper, the saddle ends up way too far forward for it to be useful as a stabilizer.

Reply

tripsforkidsvancouver
tripsforkidsvancouver
7 months, 4 weeks ago
+1 Cam McRae

6"3, 36" pant inseam, long legs. I used to manually slide down my 150mm droppers with the quick release before gnarly descents. 200mm Onup v2 was a game changer. Have the 210mm X-Fusion stock on my Norco Sight now and it is enough for me. This is my first 29er bike and also the first time my as* has rubbed the rear tire so much. The low seat is definitely a huge part here! I wouldn't need 240mm so this is definitely either a niche market or OneUp's version of building the Burj Khalifa! Designed by men no doubt :)

Also - anyone else still have the Titec post-in-a-post sitting around? I keep one with a shim in my parts box for if my dropper ever breaks. That post was a GAME CHANGER!

Reply

DogVet
Hugo Williamson
8 months ago
0

Are you actually on the correct size bike with a dropper this long??

Reply

HollyBoni
HollyBoni
8 months ago
+1 Geof Harries

Just as an example, my inseam is around 92cm and i'm 185cm tall. My bike is the biggest size the manufacturer makes and it has a 500mm seat tube. I have a OneUp 210 currently, with about 1cm of space between the seat clamp and the collar. 500mm is considered pretty long, I see some other XL bikes with seat tubes in the 460-480mm range. On bikes like that i'd have a bunch of exposed post even with a OneUp 210.

Reply

gdharries
Geof Harries
8 months ago
+1 HollyBoni

I agree. My inseam is 94cm and the trend of mega-short seat tubes on the largest models is unfortunate, unless you have short legs. I am thankful for my XXL.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
8 months ago
+1 Geof Harries

Some companies like Norco are putting absurdly short seat tubes on their rides these days. I could see someone at like 6' 2"-6' 4" with more inseam and less gorilla than me needing this on a bike like the Optic in an XL.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
8 months ago
0

I think I am. My upper body isn't very long so a larger/longer bike isn't necessarily the solution. And that certainly won't help get the saddle out of the way on descents. The reach of the large SB150 is 485mm and I have comfortably ridden bikes up to 500, but beyond that feels too big with my preference of 750 or 760mm bars. 

I tend to size for reach rather than post length.

Reply

tim-lane
Tim Lane
8 months ago
0

@Cam McRae, do you think you'd feel benefit from the full 240mm drop if your bike had a 27.5" rear wheel? (i.e 40mm less tire-ass inteference). I'm also 6'0", thinking I might at least give the 240mm post a try (on my mixed-wheel bike).

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae
8 months ago
+1 Tim Lane

Possibly but I personally didn't find any added benefit in terms of descending going over 220mm. And discomfort when seated would remain. Our proportions and riding styles may differ, however. My riding position has veered towards an extended leg, weight forward descending position which likely has an impact as well. Cheers!

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