OneUp Goes to 10-50

Words Pete Roggeman
Photos Dave Smith
Date Mar 20, 2016

 

OneUp-Components-50T-Shark-Sprocket-Green-Front-Assembled-M700-Evil-Following-Orange-966

Dinner is served. 50 teeth look massive – and dwarf a 7″ brake rotor.

OneUp goes to 10-50.
With the front derailleur being pushed nose first into the loam, the logical step in the drivetrain campaign is to attack from the back. The cogset wars are well underway and OneUp Components just dropped the mic: their new cogset is now available as a 10-50 and they’re calling it Shark (great whites have about 50 teeth…that worked out nicely). In the process, they’ve left tooth marks in an Eagle (that’ll make sense soon) and have one-upped Shimano’s recently announced 11-46T cassette as well as e-13’s 9-44. There are pros and cons in each case, but for now, OneUp can lay claim to the only 500% gear range, and it’s available right fuckin now – none of this dicking around with availability months after a press release.

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I’ve mounted Shark to the Nomad as well as an oval 34T ring up front and have already noticed an improvement when scampering up some steep climbs on Mt. Seymour.

I headed up to Squamish earlier this week to jump the Shark myself and came away impressed – and with a 50T cogset on my Nomad, as well as a chainring jump from 30 to 34 teeth. Does everyone need 50 in the back? Hell no. But if your terrain goes up steeply in places and you’d like to be able to reach decent speeds on roads or wide open spaces of trail, then this represents a huge opportunity.

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We’re starting to get the hang of climbing trails on the Shore.

A 500% gear range rivals and surpasses many 2x setups. You have a large jump at the low end from 42 to 50 teeth to contend with – which won’t be loved by racers especially – but in this age of increasingly trying to get one bike to do everything you want it to, this is another step forward. Shifting is surprisingly smooth and…there isn’t too much else to say initially, except that it works as advertised without too much in the way of funky B-tension or other weirdness. You may have to play with crank spacing, and the chain does drop from the 50 when I backpedal (on the Nomad – the Yeti was fine) but I’ve had that issue with most SRAM 10-42t setups as well – nothing new there.

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OneUp Shark isn’t just for giving your legs a rest on the climb. You’ll maximize the benefit of it by running a larger ring up front as well. In this photo I’m in 34-11 and that allowed for some nice, torquey pull out of the high speed turns on Upper Dale’s.

We’re putting time into a variety of systems right now, with more on the way, and we’ll report more on them all as we have a chance to evaluate them. But based on initial impressions on two bikes (a Santa Cruz Nomad and a Yeti SB-6c) I can endorse this $125 (US) upgrade as both money well spent and a reliable way to increase your range. You may need to factor in a new front ring (go up 4 teeth) and, maybe, a new chain. Still worth it. Note: the $125 kit gives you a derailleur cage which will work with a Shimano Shadow+ 11-speed derailleur and the 50 tooth ring. If you want to run 10-50, you also need to spring for their new MiniDriver freehub body and a 10-12 tooth cluster – $40 USD. Compatible already with Hope, DT Swiss, and Stan’s (more on the way – it’s open source and not a big deal for manufacturers to offer).

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It’s actually steep here even though you can’t tell. Normally it’s 30-42 and a grunt. In 34-50 I was spinning freely – almost easily.

The press release from OneUp with a lot of detail is below.


OneUp-Components-1x11-Drivetrain-Range-Chart

Drivetrain ranges. Missing from there is e-13’s 9-44T cassette, which represents a 489% range. With OneUp Shark, you can run a bigger chainring, with e-13, you can go smaller. Clearance up front and, with certain frame designs, an opportunity to min/max pedaling characteristics. Small tuning options. Good stuff.

OneUp Components Shark 10-50T: The widest range 11-speed 1X system ever.

A climb crushing, descent hammering, 500% of range.

OneUp Shark is a set of modular upgrades for Shimano 11 speed mountain cassettes. Extend the range of your stock Shimano 11-42T cassette by almost a third, by adding a 50T sprocket and cage kit, a 10T cluster or both. Shark allows you to build the perfect cassette for the trails that you ride.

Shark 50T Sprocket and Cage Kit
Increase your chainring size by 4 teeth, and still gain range on both ends of your cassette. This means a higher top speed, a better average chainline (you now spend more time in the middle of your cassette) and legs for days on your next backcountry epic. The converted 11-50T cassette is the widest range cassette available that uses a standard freehub body.

OneUp-Components-50T-Shark-Sprocket-Kit-Grey-Front-966

In the standard Shark kit you get the 50T ring as well as an 18 (to replace your 17 and 19) and a derailleur cage – which works with Shimano Shadow+ 11-spd derailleurs.

Shark 50T Sprocket Tech Specs:

Cassette Progression: 11,13,15,18,21,24,28,32,37,42,50
Sprocket Material: 7075-T6 Aluminum (50T), Nickel plated hardened steel (18T). Maintains the 42T as the smallest aluminum sprocket, preventing premature drivetrain wear. No major drivetrain manufacturer goes smaller than a 40T cassette sprocket in aluminum.

Compatibility: XT M8000 11-42T cassettes (For Shimano 11-40 use the OneUp 45T sprocket)
Freehub requirement: Standard freehub
Cassette range improvement: 19%
Colours: Grey or Green

Shark Cage Tech Specs:
Pulley Offset: 50% more than stock
Compatibility: Shimano Shadow+ 11spd rear derailleurs
Colours: Grey or Grey/Green

Shark 50T Sprocket and Cage Kit MSRP: $125 USD

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Spring for another $40 US and get yourself the 10-12T cluster and the MiniDrive freehub body (shown inside the 10-12).

Looking for even more top end? Add the Shark 10-12T Cluster and OneUp MiniDriver, to gain another 10% range on any 11-speed Shimano mountain cassette.

OneUp has collaborated with Hope Technology to develop a non-proprietary, freehub body standard that accepts a 10T sprocket. This shortened version of a standard freehub is available for Hope, Stan’s and DT hubs with more coming soon. The MiniDriver open standard isn’t shrouded in patents, making the production of inexpensive 10T equipped cassettes a future possibility.

10T Cluster Tech Specs:
Kit contains: 10-12 cluster, 14T and 15T
Cassette Progression:
– 10-12-14-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40 (11-40 Shimano converted to 10-40)
– 10-12-14-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42 (11-42 Shimano converted to 10-42)
– 10-12-15-18-21-24-27-31-25-40-45 (11-45 OneUp’d Shimano converted to 10-45)
– 10-12-15-18-21-24-28-32-37-42-50 (11-50 OneUp’d Shimano converted to 10-50)
Compatibility: Shimano 11-spd 11-40 and 11-42 cassettes and OneUp’d Shimano 11-45 and 11-50 cassettes
Freehub requirement: OneUp MiniDriver (or compatible)
Cassette range improvement: 10%
Colour: Nickel Plated cluster with Green Lockring
MSRP – $45

The 500% range of a Shark 10-50T cassette matches a typical 2×11 drivetrain, which should be enough to silence any remaining 2X hold outs.

MiniDriver Tech Specs:
Length: 4.5mm shorter than a standard freehub
Lockring Thread: M29
OneUp DT star ratchet compatible MiniDriver MSRP – $40

Ride faster, higher and longer with a wider range cassette.

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Close-up of the MiniDrive freehub and 10-12T cluster. This is what you’ll need to get from 11-50 to 10-50. #worklessridemore

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Clever. That spacing inside the 50T helps fit a 10T cluster riding on OneUp’s MiniDriver freehub – no XD driver required. Already compatible with Stan’s, DT Swiss, and Hope hubs. More in the works.

OneUp-Components-50T-Shark-Sprocket-Grey-Assembled-M700-Iso-966

Come ‘n get it.

OneUp-Components-Shark-Cage-Green-Assembled-XT-M700-RD-Front

There’s a closer look at the Shark cage.

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These decals look amazing on seat/chainstay junctions. Or head tubes. Can’t get enough sharks, really.

Order yours today at www.oneupcomponents.com.


You’re gonna want to brag about how big your booty is – OneUp’s hashtags are below. While we’re at it, are you following @nsmbteam on Instagram? Maybe you should be.

@oneupcomponents | #getoneup | #worklessridemore | #sharkattack


How do you like dem apples?

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Comments

craw
0
Cr4w  - March 21, 2016, 8:55 a.m.

I wonder why they didn't opt for a 46 or 48 to give a slightly smaller jump?

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k4m1k4z3
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K4m1k4z3  - March 21, 2016, 1:03 p.m.

You'll see in a few days.

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craw
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Cr4w  - March 21, 2016, 2:25 p.m.

Now I'm going to need more information!

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 4:08 p.m.

True. Also…e-13 offers 489% range, and 500 was the unicorn. They couldn't do less than e-13.

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Timmigrant
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Tim Coleman  - March 22, 2016, 11:27 a.m.

As I mentioned in the e13 article I'm on the limit of the X1 derailleur eating enough chain on a bike with substantial chain growth to reach from 9 to 44 tooth rings. The cage length on this looks longer than the X1, but I wonder if there is a limit on chain growth as 10 - 50 is an additional 5 links to eat up.

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0
t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 7:28 a.m.

i don't understand how derailing on backpedaling is 'acceptable'

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 8:08 a.m.

It's not. But if it's comparable to what it replaces, it's a net zero in terms of acceptability.

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t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 8:13 a.m.

fair enough…I still think it's hilarious how people lament the front derailleur yet are willing to accept actual shitty attributes of these expanded gear cassettes.

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0
t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 8:14 a.m.

fair enough….I still think it's hilarious how people whinge about the 'complexity' of a 2x setup but are wholly willing to accept these very real negative attributes of extended range 1x cassettes

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Dirk
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Dirk  - March 21, 2016, 8:29 a.m.

It sucks, but it seldom factors into real world riding. That would be my take on why it isn't a big deal.

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t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 8:42 a.m.

I would strongly disagree that it seldom factors into real world riding…maybe if all you do if spin up logging roads or 5% grade mineral surfaced trails.

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Dirk
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Dirk  - March 21, 2016, 8:46 a.m.

That's why I called it "my take".

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CoilAir
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CoilAir  - March 21, 2016, 12:59 p.m.

I ride the shore regularly and am semi-okay at lots of the technical climbing available. I have to say that backpedal derailment, while not ideal, has never affected a single ride for me.

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drewm
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DrewM  - March 21, 2016, 5:25 p.m.

I love all the new Singletrack climbs on the shore, but there are very few "technical" moves on them, and few regularly ridden technical climbs on the Shore in general (not counting steep pitches or tight switchback corners as technical trail features) in the vein of what I'd assume Todd is talking about.

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t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 5:41 p.m.

That's exactly what I'm talking about, Drew….stuff with lots of odd shape roots and rocks, lunges, weird shit where you're grinding away and need a quick rachet or backpedal to clear an obstacle. maybe those kinds of trails are going away, or maybe I just find myself on them more often, but I cannot trust any expanded cog setup to not derail and leave me standing beside my bike pushing as every single one has done that to me in those situations….

I actually like the thinking of the larger cog to allow for a bigger front chainring as my other big complaint about 1x is lack of top end speed and being forced to coast everywhere….but the chainline thing will keep me away from this too likely.

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drewm
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DrewM  - March 21, 2016, 8:45 p.m.

Keeping in mind I also prefer what is now considered a slack seat angle (so maybe I'm just a grumpy old luddite), if it's my personal bike I'm definitely going with one of Shimano's new forward pivoting front derailleurs. Maybe sounds a bit ridiculous given I love singlespeeding and it is another level of complexity over a 1x system (extra shifter, extra mech, extra ring) but I like the fast up/down single shift that the front derailleur gives me, the awesome(r) chainline, and the low gears for working the bike up technical bits without losing the top end.

But, I definitely understand I'm in the minority. Riders are definitely voting with their wallets and there are many bikes on the shop floor that are perfectly capable of accepting a front derailleur (some of which ride better with a larger ring than they are being spec'd with 1x), vs. the few new models that are 1x specific, that are coming spec'd with 1x systems because that's what riders want.

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Jerry-Rig
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Jerry Willows  - March 21, 2016, 8:46 a.m.

Where is the weight on this thing? All these add-ons make 2x more likeable if you need gear range plus 2x will give you a proper chain line. Add in Di2 and the complexity is nil.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 11:24 p.m.

It's nominal. Less than 100 grams to go from an 11-42 (current XT) to a 10-50 including derailleur plates (only 7g more or so), 50t ring, and 10-12 cluster.

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miked.
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can't pedal backwards  - March 21, 2016, 3:13 p.m.

I ride a Nomad here on the shore with Srams 1×11 and the backpedal derailment annoys the heck out of me. before I made the commitment to a frame with no front derailleur, I did all the research I could to make sure I wasn't missing anything. I never read anywhere about this issue in any of the reviews I could find. I know this is a bigger issue depending on the bike and setup… and I know I'm not the strongest climber… but being constantly stressed out through a techy climb what my gears are going to be doing while making adjustments is crazy to me. Not to mention that backpedaling while coasting down fast roads, something I've done since childhood (only because for some reason it feels good inside) is no longer a thing. I've literally had to train myself to not backpedal when looking for that childhood feeling of freedom. How this mostly goes unmentioned on the biggest reviews of the biggest thing in bikes since the dropper post is mind blowing. It's not until you get into the comment sections or the reviews on this new 50t setup that people talk about it. Again, it's probably my fault for riding my bike wrong. Also, I'd still not trade my Nomad or it's faulty drivetrain for anything 🙂

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 4:07 p.m.

The backpedal thing only happens on the 42 (sometimes, on some bikes), or, in this case, in the 50, on one of the two bikes I've ridden. If you can't backpedal in your 21 or 24 (or 11 etc) while coasting downhill, then you have a different issue. I've been running a Nomad for almost two years, and backpedaling in 42 is not a problem - nor is it in any other gear on that bike. I have experienced it on other bikes, though.

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drewm
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DrewM  - March 21, 2016, 5:16 p.m.

If you have a crankset with a "standard" 4-bolt chainring you can solve the issue you are experiencing by spacing the ring inboard. It will still work fine in the high gears (although obviously the chainline will be less-optimal) and you'll get better shifting performance, life (wear), and no dropped chains in the low gears.

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t.odd  - March 21, 2016, 5:36 p.m.

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miked.
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can't pedal backwards  - March 21, 2016, 5:38 p.m.

DrewM

I think part of my problem is the cinch turbine crankset I'm running. From what I understand, it's a consequence of the Race Face direct mount chainline.

Pete

You're absolutely correct, on the higher gears it is a non issue. I do experience it in the lowest 2 gears though. I suppose the "training myself not to backpedal" part is a more a general thing to get myself out of the habit in general to avoid issues on the trail. I should have been more detailed and less bitchy in my comment 😀

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craw
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Cr4w  - March 21, 2016, 5:40 p.m.

Are some direct-mount rings spaced inboard further than others?

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drewm
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DrewM  - March 21, 2016, 5:42 p.m.

Yes. Different direct-mount rings have different chainlines. I've not heard of any that sit inboard enough to make enough of a difference to resolve this issue (just as while many people note that it is only a problem on some frames I've yet to see a list of bikes where it isn't an issue). They'd have to be made of a heck of a thick piece of billet.

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Dirk
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Dirk  - March 21, 2016, 8:48 p.m.

You must be reading the wrong websites. I definitely mentioned it here:

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drewm
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DrewM  - March 21, 2016, 8:49 p.m.

You can buy a spider for your Cinch crankset that lets you run "standard" bolt on rings.

Yes it would add weight.

Just noting that there are ways to correct your chainline issue if it's a big deal for you.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 22, 2016, 9:19 a.m.

The irony of that is that OneUp is comprised of ex Race Face guys…that are responsible for Cinch!

Hey man, backpedaling is necessary sometimes for ratcheting up tech climbs, and at other times it's just fun. Just like bitching in article comments 😉 You can stop one but don't have to stop the other - I'll let you decide…

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miked.
0
can't pedal backwards  - March 22, 2016, 10:14 a.m.

For my case, I was specifically talking SRAM 1x… back when it was the greatest thing since sliced bread and could do no wrong… Even when I discovered the issue for myself, the only information I could find on it was in comment sections and forums… not in any of the professional reviews. Of course, that doesn't mean the information wasn't out there… could be I'm a bad Googler

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miked.
0
can't pedal backwards  - March 22, 2016, 10:17 a.m.

Thanks for the advice! I'll look into that!

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hbelly13
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Raymond Epstein  - March 21, 2016, 6:22 a.m.

OneUp blew the doors down Thanksgiving '13 when they released their original 42t cog. Suddenly you didn't have to spend a fortune to have a wide range cassette. I hope they will find a way to make something like this work for SRAM users too.

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CoilAir
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CoilAir  - March 21, 2016, 1:01 p.m.

I'm sure once SRAM's Eagle 1×12 groupset is released later this week, and all their 1×11 groups drop the 10t cog and go back to a Shimano splined freehub body, you'll be able to use this set up. But don't believe everything you read on the internet…

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craw
0
Cr4w  - March 21, 2016, 5:41 p.m.

That is hilarious. After all that they're going to drop the XD body and go back to Shimano? Is it April 1 already? Oh wait.

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hbelly13
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Raymond Epstein  - March 22, 2016, 11:18 a.m.

Doubtful that SRAM will dump the XD. OneUp's Minidriver (Clever tip of the hat to the Gen X movie star) is good idea and they left it open source too. I have continued to use a 42t cog with my 10 speed set up simply because it works great and I cannot find a good reason (cost, performance, weight savings) to switch. Not including the NX stuff (which is too heavy) I would be into nearly $700 retail to go to GX including the XD conversion bits for my Hadley hub. That gets me no weight savings and one extra tooth. That's tough to justify.

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zigak
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ZigaK  - March 21, 2016, 12:45 a.m.

re: backpedaling
I read a review of the shark on a different site and the reviewer said that he had no issues when backpedaling in 50t but in the 42t the chain would derail even though it had better chain line being in the second spot out.
Did you have similar issues with the 42t?

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 8:08 a.m.

No problem in the 42t. That was Levy on PB and he attributed it specifically to the bike he was riding. I can't claim to have my setup absolutely dialed yet and we'll see if I can get the backpedal issue sorted a bit after a little more tweaking.

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zigak
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ZigaK  - March 21, 2016, 10:06 a.m.

I read it on bikerumor. They had it set up on Kona heihei with 49mm chain line.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 4:09 p.m.

I heard that site was only full of rumors. And that most of them weren't even their own.

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Dirk
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Dirk  - March 21, 2016, 8:48 p.m.

Ouch.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - March 21, 2016, 11:27 p.m.

Deserved and then some.

Reply

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