Trek Commuter Pro RT Light Kali Invader NSMB Andrew Major (2)
EDITORIAL

One Mechanical From Dark

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Oct 3, 2022
Reading time

Spoked

I have a special kind of luck when it comes to proper ride-ending mechanicals. They almost always happen when it's raining sideways. If it's not raining then it will most certainly be pitch black. They don't happen to my bike often, but whenever this subject comes up I can't help but think of the two separate times that the (hidden) aluminum spoke nipples on my Enve front wheel disintegrated, a pile of spokes pulled out of the rim, and I was left doing the old two-foot shuffle out of the woods.

In both situations it was well after dark and nothing more than an inconvenience. I adjusted the helmet light to a more walking-friendly brightness, turned off the bar light to keep it in reserve, and started strutting. I'm not generally too far from civilization when I'm out on the trails at night and so even if it septupled my time back to the car it simply wasn't a big deal. It wasn't a big deal because I had lights with me. It was a night ride after all. But it was surprising how long it took to walk out with my deconstructed hoop, both times, compared to riding back to base.

There's a very real chasing-the-last-light window where those wheel woes would have resulted in an unexpected walk out in the dark. Or worse, given the dark and rainy nature of those nights, hunkering down until dawn with my too-small Space Blanket and whatever stale science experiment of a granola bar is forming a fresh society, forgotten in the bottom of my pack. In both of those instances I was with friends, but it was just as likely for me to have been alone In the dark.

Trek Commuter Pro RT Light Kali Invader NSMB Andrew Major (1)

Fewer lumens, fantastic light. My review of the new Trek Commuter RT Pro light will be in soon. The optics on high are the story when it comes to trail mode, but the commuter setting's 'Kindbeam' setup that keeps from flashing drivers and other riders is very nifty for those of us who often ride from somewhere.

In the fall, in the forest, almost any afternoon ride can become a night ride with the wrong set of circumstances. Shit happens, and if you or your friend is hurt in the woods at any hour, make the call so the wonderful folks at your local SAR or fire department can come and get you. But please don't ruin some volunteers' dinner with their families or have your local first responders trudging around in the forest looking for you because you didn't bother to pack some sort of light source. We all know the flashlight on your phone, that you could potentially need to call for help, doesn't count right? Right?

There are plenty of riders out on the trails who are obviously unprepared for the transition to fall riding. I say that fully aware that a wicked-bright light fits easily in a hip pack or frame bag. It's just one of those things - nosey know-it-all that I am - that if I'm thinking I might need lights, and I'm properly passing someone, well, it seems neighbourly to ask if they're packing. I carry a spare and there's an okay chance that if someone has lent you a light to ride out on Fromme or Seymour in the last few years, it was me.

Soaked

I've only had a call to use a Space Blanket a couple of times and while they're amazing for how light they are and how little space they take up, they also kind of suck. I've been talking about upgrading to a larger option for trailside mylar snuggles, maybe even a Space Bivy, because for a few grams more, if it's actually needed it's nice to have the right tool for the job.

Aside from injury management, there are plenty of situations that call for extra layers in the forest and mechanicals are a common one. I've stood around on a proper cold and rainy day waiting for a friend to sort something - and folks have done the same for me - and it's amazing how fast things go from comfortable to chilly without some strategic gear choices. For me, that means wearing a pack. Some of my friends are on the frame bag program for lights, jackets, snacks, and extra water and I know some folks who do a pretty amazing job of using their hip packs dimensions for all the things.

7Mesh Guardian Vest NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

My weatherproof, breathable, 7Mesh Guardian vest has a perfectly-sized hood for sitting over my full-face helmets. I don't ride with it up often, but when I do I'm so glad it's there. Hanging around waiting for friends it's a beautiful feature.

RaceFace Emotional Support Layers NSMB AndrewM (8).JPG

This RaceFace Stash jacket has proven to be a great piece when I need it and something I never think about floating around in my pack when I don't. I will say that the Pearl Izumi Summit Shell is still my preferred ESJ though. What's your favourite emotional support jacket?

The first thing I do when we stop in the rain is pop my hood over my helmet. Even if it's just for a second, it's not like it's a big deal to pull it off again, but making the decision to cover my head right away is a comfort booster when quickly plugging the tire turns into installing a tube. This is a reason I always seek out jackets that have over-a-helmet hoods. My weatherproof vest also has a big enough hood to cover my full-face helmet.

I also like to swap out to dry, and preferably warmer, gloves if we're going to be stopped for any length of time. I didn't used to get particularly cold hands, and still prefer to ride in the lightest gloves whenever I can get away with it, but I guess my circulation isn't as good as it used to be because I get proper cold digits in the rain now. Carbon brake levers help a lot, and I'm trying some lever grips from Lizard Skins on my aluminum levers to see if they help. I'm also still a big fan of 100% Brisker gloves - the regular version, not the claimed weatherproof version - as a happy medium between warmer and usable.

Since the weather is often ornery around here, even if I'm not packing a hard shell, I never leave home without an emotional support jacket, spare gloves, a change of shirt, and usually some fresh socks. I know the socks sound silly - if your shoes are soaked they're soaked - but just like putting on fresh gloves that are going to be soaked in minutes, sometimes there's a psychological boost from sliding your foot into fresh merino, and I don't feel like I have to be sheepish about it.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM.JPG

As an aside, I think my new rule if after one wet winter wheel removal you have to commit to running CushCore, or another run-flat-friendly insert system, until it's been over 10°c for at least two weeks straight.

100 Percent Brisker Glove NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

I can imagine better other-season gloves than the 100% Brisker but I have yet to find them here in reality. These aren't weatherproof, super-warm, or nano-thin but they're a solid compromise in keeping my hands happier.

Stoked

The sweetest part of night riding is once you're out in the dark then you're out in the dark. It's all bonus time. Hit easier trails than you'd normally aim for and be happy that 1.5hrs on high translates to a couple of hours ride with good light management. So what if it's raining? Pop your hood on and you're in your own ecosystem anyways. And even if night riding isn't the goal, I think it's fairly easy to justify a very decent all-in-one light system that's great for your dawn, day, dusk, or after-dark commuting needs and worthy of being in your pack so that you don't have to try and ride by brail when the universe turns the lights out on you.

Once you have the proper gear to keep you comfortable enough when things go sideways, maybe you'll be extra motivated to get out in all weather and at any hour. Then when we cross paths near sundown in the trees and I ask if you have a light you can smile, say yes, and ask if I have enough juice for another lap. Hopefully, I do. We motivated after-dark forest travelers need to stick together.

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 months, 1 week ago
+5 Andrew Major kcy4130 yardrec Niels van Kampenhout hairymountainbeast

My preference is for morning rides whenever possible. Nothing to do with safety, but in the winter it does allow for a lot of daylight to sort out a mechanical, walk out or wait for help. For those times I ride at night I do use 2 bike lights and have a fully charged phone. So at least I should be in the dark if one or even two lights fail.

Happily I have not had a mobility kill mechanical nor an injury that required SAR so far in my MTB career.

It's hard to get other people stoked about this, but my favourite type of night ride in winter is a pre-dawn rip. The trails are empty, the darkness gets less and less as I ride and if I can get to a viewpoint there is a nice sunrise on offer as a reward. If something were to happen being stranded in the pitch black for 10hrs+ isn't a risk.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Vik Banerjee finbarr

I used to love dawn rides. Often timing worked that I could climb up in the dark and come down in light. 

Now if I can’t get out during the day while my kid’s at school it’s going to be after bedtime.

Reply

kcy4130
kcy4130
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Yeah I never worry about getting stuck past dark. I'm very much a morning person. And I start early (at work) so can usually leave as early as noon once or twice a week. Or I can ride before work when too hot in summer to ride after work.

This also reminds me of a classic dad joke: I hate funerals, I'm not a mourning person.

Reply

TristanC
TristanC
2 months, 1 week ago
+4 Andrew Major Adrian Bostock Pete Roggeman Velocipedestrian

I'd like to shout out the humble Emotional Support Jacket. I've had one living in my saddle bag for years and I've lost track of the number of times it's made me just that little bit more comfortable. Good work, little guy.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 TristanC

I don’t use it much, but I’m always happy to know it’s there.

Reply

Joe_Dick
Adrian Bostock
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 Andrew Major Todd Hellinga Niels van Kampenhout

I am in the camp of my light is on my bike for any ride which starts after noon this time of year. I use a 500 lumen bar light if I don’t plan on being out in the dark. I also have a rear red light for the cruise home along the road. 

whether I bring a pack or not depends on the weather. still feels like summer, for now. 

Changing flats in the field if you are running inserts is not something I have yet to have to do and not something I look forward to. I guess whether or not you run it flat depends how far you are from home. around here it’s pretty easy to tick off 20-50 km rides in a few hours if you count the commute to and from the trailhead. not far from home on a bike, a long ways from home on foot or pedalling a flat tire.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Adrian Bostock capnron

I’ve put in a decent ride home on a fully flat rear with CushCore. Trail plus road combined I guesstimated it out to just under 20km. It would have required patching a sidewall to put a tube in. It’s slower but reasonable. 

My longest front run flat was just under 10km with a lot of it uphill but all on road. Cornering sucked but it was totally pedalable where normally a full-flat is not. 

I’ve twice now seen riders coming down with insert-bandoliers dripping sealant and that certainly informs my insert choice (as rare an occurrence as it may be - I don’t want that to be me). 

———

Yeah, it’s been a bizarre September. I know a couple of people who’ve almost been caught out without lights (bailed out to the road at the right time) because they’re not used to sunny September/October weather.

They’re taking lights on every ride now too. Certainly part of my inspiration to write this.

Reply

Joe_Dick
Adrian Bostock
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Andrew Major Todd Hellinga

A long time ago I was in NV visiting a friend who had just moved down there. It was around this time of year. Both of us had similar experience playing around in the wilderness that there may have been a little complacency in our ride planning. On the way back to the car, as we re grouped at the top of Severed D it was starting to get dark. He looked at me and said, "Experienced Hikers Go Missing". lol.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 Adrian Bostock Todd Hellinga capnron

Hahahaha. I’ve been lost once with my batteries dead or nearing the end of their run times on all three lights (helmet, bar, spare) and enough cell service to call home and say “I’m paying idiot tax, don’t send anyone, I’ll see you when the sun comes up” but luckily over the next ridge I could see some houses.

Crazy how easy it is to get turned around in the dark even with lights and being in an area (I thought) I knew well.

Reply

FlipFantasia
Todd Hellinga
2 months, 1 week ago
+4 Andrew Major Adrian Bostock Pete Roggeman capnron

I nearly got caught out a couple falls back, was mid september, smokey air, and weather was rolling in with fog so it started getting really dark about an hour before I expected. Was walking the dog out of town in a unfamiliar area and stumbled on a new trail build so obviously needed to check it out, didn't have my pack or light like normal and ended up getting off the brushed line in some bluffy terrain...had a scary half hour and ended up back at the truck as it went full dark. Lesson learned!

Reply

kperras
Kenneth Perras
2 months, 1 week ago
+7 Andrew Major Adrian Bostock Ryan Walters AndrewR Pete Roggeman JT capnron

Cushcore tip: make sure the spare tube you're packing is of the long valve stem variety. You can install the tube on top of the cushcore and poke the stem through it, and out the valve stem hole in the rim. Of course some tire levers might be nice, especially if you're running tough casing tires. The one included with the OneUp tool works well enough for the time I had to do this exact repair.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

That’s a solid tip! Thanks.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
2 months, 1 week ago
0

This tip just blew my mind. Brilliant, Ken.

Reply

jt
JT
2 months, 1 week ago
0

More than a few folx owe you a bevy for that nugget.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

I gotta ask, after riding 20km on a fully flat CC, the insert must be pretty cut up and damaged??

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Pete Roggeman capnron

I’m still riding the same inserts years later. They certainly don’t look new but they work like new. Lost count of how many tires they’ve been in.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
2 months ago
+1 capnron

Interesting. When I was running CC, I never had a run-flat experience, but the inserts definitely sustained some damage just through general riding. Obviously, all those damaged spots were instances where I could have easily caved a rim in, so worth it.

Reply

cheapondirt
cheapondirt
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Lynx . capnron

Yesterday I ran into a guy with a light on his bars at 5:30 pm. It was sunny and there had to be an hour of daylight left. I internally saluted him for undertaking a long evening ride on a Sunday night, then to my bemusement saw him again twenty minutes later, loading up at the trailhead. Now I'm the underprepared dummy! Thanks for the reminder Andrew.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 cheapondirt

Hahahaha. Great story. I should add a disclaimer that I learned this stuff the hard way too. It’s shared with love not judgement.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

Once I'm heading out for an afternoon/evening ride, a light is on the bike, period. It weighs not much and at the least it'll help keep me safe coming back during dusk or at worst to see what I'm doing if I have a serious mechanical I need to fix. I try to pass this along to anyone I ride or bring into riding, but it always truly amazes me how many don't want the extra "weight" - these tools also don't normally have a spare tube or if they do, no pump.

As to the rest of the stuff you talk about, where you live, makes perfect sense to me, but again, too many who don't want the extra "weight" or to use a proper pack, etc, etc. It could apply down here to me I guess, but honestly now, I don't have that "need" to ride so bad that I'll go out when there's weather expected, I just don't enjoy the having to clean down the bike or being wet and cold as I did when I was younger and newer to the sport.

As to night riding, hell yeah, completely opens up a whole new world, makes trails that were getting "old" and boring new again and with where lights are these days and the cost for a decent light being . I was the first guy to bring in a HID light, when I was on the roads heading home on a night (common back then when I HAD to ride as often as possible) the people would freak out and think it was some silent motorbike coming because it was so bright and would then freak again when it was just a bike.

Reply

fartymarty
fartymarty
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Sandy James Oates

Even in the middle of summer I'm carrying a light.  Worst case I have a mini-mag on my keyring.

I'm surprised helmets don't come with front and rear lights built into them.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

You can buy some integrated commuter helmet/light setups but modularity is key don’t you think? I’ve had lights survive helmets getting written off and vice versa. 

Daytime running lights is becoming more popular. The Trek light I’m reviewing has a day-flasher mode (and also the traffic friendly night mode that didn’t blast other riders/drivers in the face, which I mentioned). I’ve started using a rear light in the day with my daughter so I guess I’m at least partially bought in. 

And yeah, the Kali mount is so quick/easy and also fits the helmet (open) that I ride to work in so the light and a small/bright rear just live in my pack. Never know when you’ll have a chance to take the long way home.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

We’ve had a shockingly dry September, but most years if riders aren’t willing to ride in the wet - on any number of trails armoured for this usage - then they’re hanging up their bike for months at a time. 

I don’t know that anyone “enjoys” being wet and cold. I certainly don’t. But I’ll suck it up for forest time on a bike.

Proper rainy days are of course also the best time to do trail work (thanks, Jerry).

Reply

syncro
Mark
2 months ago
+1 capnron

I'm a bit of an outlier in that rainy rides can be awesome, it's just the cleanup after that is a hassle.

Reply

Squint
Squint
2 months ago
+1 capnron

Totally agree with you. I actually find that traction is a bit more predictable when it's wet.

Reply

Jeff_Carter
Jeff Carter
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

Does any company make a waterproof thin glove? 

I've tried 100% Hydromatic & Brisker, Specialized, Castelli. Nothing has kept my hands dry for a whole ride yet.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 JVP

I’ve never found something that’s both wearable and actually waterproof. If there was I’d own a couple pairs.

I’ve been thinking that those hand guards that Sam Hill uses should have a winter version with little tents to block wind/rain. I mean, I would try them for certain.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Lynx . capnron

"I’ve been thinking that those hand guards that Sam Hill uses should have a winter version with little tents to block wind/rain. I mean, I would try them for certain."

My GF has circulation issues in her hands and rides with neoprene poggies installed on her MTB on particularly cold/wet days. She loves them and they install/remove relatively easily so she doesn't keep them on if they are not needed.

As a bonus they are twice as much theft protection as a rear Mudhugger. ;-)

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Anti-theft guarantee mush be very good with those hahahaha. 

What are they like to exit in a crash? 

I’m more interested in dry than warm but there’s days I’d consider them for sure.

Reply

kcy4130
kcy4130
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

They're a bit harder to get out of in a crash, but not too bad. A lot of it is psychological for me anyhow, just makes me nervous about being able to bail. It's a similar feeling to a flat pedal rider on clips for the first time. In the pnw I'd avoid the well insulated ones, here in MT I sweat too much in my cheapo rockbros poggies if it's warmer than 10F (-12C). 

Going fast or into a strong head wind they can sometimes actuate the brake levers just a little which can be sketchy when not expecting braking. Same with g outs or similar. One has to hold the poggie away from the lever with the index fingers, which takes some getting used to. I guess my point is that poggies suck, but they're way better than frostbite.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

"...poggies suck, but they're way better than frostbite."

hahahaha and thanks. 

Any thoughts on just some GoreTex poggies? Like just a shell without insulation. I guess it would be the same story with crashing. Anything that's sealing out the elements is going to keep you in? At least to a degree?

mrbrett
mrbrett
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Andrew, the Wolf Tooth pogies have less insulation, a clip on the end of the bar so you don't have any interference at all with your brake/shift levers, and zippered vents to open up when it's too warm. Kind of like the gore tex bags you're talking about ...

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Thanks @MrBrett, I’ll admit I haven’t had a chance to play with any options but BarMitts. 

Would you say with the WT ones there’d be no issue with getting out in a crash?

kcy4130
kcy4130
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Not sure about shell poggies. I'd think some water would run down ones arms into them, but would keep hands dryer than no poggie. Wind chill is the big reason for poggies (for me) so a shell even if not completely water tight might still help a lot. Vik's neoprene ones look interesting for pnw climate.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
AndrewR
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Hbar

I have crashed my fat bike (before I committed to studded winter tyres) with these on - you eject just as quickly as not having poggies. The bonus is that the neoprene provides some extra protection for your controls.

Reply

mrbrett
mrbrett
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

Yeah, no problem getting my hands out of any brand of pogies either. The bars are either forcibly removed from my hands (quickly) or I have no problem ejecting otherwise.

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

Alright, I need to look into thin poggies. I have carbon brake levers on my Marin, which makes a huge difference, but I need to figure out something for my other setups. If it quick to move them bike to bike? It’s a new category for me.

Kevin26
Kevin26
2 months ago
0

I remember reading a review of a riding jacket that had a fold out hand cover thing, wonder if that worked out. 

If it's super wet i've used disposable rubber gloves over riding gloves (hands stay dry, grip and dexterity aren't good though) for years but finally got some 100% briskers a little while ago. If it ever rains again I'm looking forward to trying them out.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

I’ve seen folks running disposables under up-sized regular gloves with positive feedback when asked. 

Little jacket flaps are an interesting idea.

Reply

JVP
JVP
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

I've tried way too many waterproof gloves, they just all suck because you sweat them out and they get cold. Like Andrews, the non-waterproof Briskers are the best I've found. I bring a couple pair, and maybe a non-warm glove for when I'm warmed up and starting to sweat hard. Swapping into something dry half way through the ride is amazing.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 JVP

Yeah, it's not that they're particularly good. They're just better than everything else.

Reply

FlipFantasia
Todd Hellinga
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 AndrewR

I've been liking the Fox Rangers, not fully waterproof, but good in most situations that aren't heavy rain, and I generally don't ride in those conditions anyway so hasn't been a huge issue.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Cam reviewed the Pearl Izumi Pro Barrier WXB: https://nsmb.com/articles/product-review-updates-winter-edition/

And I've had good look with Gore's Infinium gloves. They're not waterproof, but the combination of water resistance, warmth, and dexterity is way better than anything else I've tried.

Reply

Squint
Squint
2 months ago
0

I keep a pair of yellow kitchen dishwashing gloves in my panniers for "wet but not too cold" commuting.

Reply

jt
JT
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Tis the beginning of the season. Pal and I went for a casual loop which happens to have a beer garden near by. Mistakes made, a liter or two had, and darkness falls. On the trail, not our eyelids. No lights, riding by memory, braille, and what little moonlight made its way through the remnants of the fall canopy. Of course one of us had to whack a derailleur (him) and have me figure out how to get things running under the cell phone's glow. Got it so he had 5 of 10, so was OK with the repair done with rock and wood. Our life partners were incredulous that a 2 hr roll somehow turned into 4, but the bent hanger and obvious gouges from the stone in his derailleur did help our cause even as our obvious C2H6O enhanced joviality hindered it. So now a light has permanent residence in my bag, same with a mount for it on the bars, and I always make sure to bring a 6" adjustable wrench for hanger adjustment and for silly little 8mm adapters for 6mm wrenches.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

8mm is a must. It’s funny how many things from crank bolts to frame hardware it can save the day for… adjustable wrench would be cleaner than my pliers in terms of hanger abuse. Always interesting where we all draw the line on the kitchen sink.

Reply

WalrusRider
WalrusRider
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

In addition to a light on my bike for rides which may involve darkness I keep an emergency blanket inside my Wolftooth pouch strapped to my frame. I figure if I get hurt and I'm unable to extract myself it will help me stay warm and dry waiting for help. It's super light and hardly takes up any space.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
+1 capnron

I keep mine in the pack. I’d totally have it and some other emergency gear in my little WT frame bag but I switch between too many bikes (hard life I know) and suffer from dad-brain so a pack saves my bacon regularly.

Reply

tmoore
tmoore
2 months, 1 week ago
0

While I sure wouldn't argue against packing an ESJ and light or using Cushcore, I do keep in mind what an old Swiss mountain guide told me "Pack the kitchen sink and you gonna need it"

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

I have friends who say the same thing about tools while ignoring the times they needed to borrow my decent-leverage 8mm, or T-15, or whatever wasn’t on their micro-multi. 

It’s a balance.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

Big fan of the Blackburn Big Switch tool, although it doesn't have the T-15. Good leverage, excellent form factor. It's my wallet on ride days too, which makes it all the more convenient. Drivers license, credit card, and if I'm riding lifts, lift pass all go in the pouch. This year I've realized a spare key to my vehicle even fits in nicely behind the large base tool. Even better.  Because I go about my life with my wallet in one of my front pockets, it feels natural up there even when riding. Oh, and it's padded enough to not dig in to my flesh when I crash. Bonus!

On the insert note, I'm not loving them right now. I ruined an alloy rim in a race weekend with cushcore and 28PSI out back, and carbon rims and inserts seem to last less than a day at the bike park. Most recently, I did my annual Whistler trip and it got cut short by exploding my carbon rim on my very first lap (In Deep). Two weeks before that a carbon rim + insert exploded on Sweet One at Sun Peaks. I might just have to go back to no insert, high PSI life on both alloy and carbon. I've gone through 5 rims in the past year running inserts and 27-30 PSI, and 1 in the past many years running no insert and 33-35 PSI out back.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 capnron

Blackburn has been making some great non-pump/rack stuff. Still impressed with the light I reviewed last year. I’m a front pocket wallet person too but not sure I could handle riding with one. 

———

Bike parking is certainly a different story than trail riding. Though it seems more folks are on mean tires and inserts now than running just air. I assume every WC DH racer uses some kind of insert now?

I’m always on the look out for two valve stems per wheel because I think (homemade) ProCore was a great way to do it.

Reply

Konda
Konda
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Better to have and not need, than need and not have.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

This is how I pack my stuff, at least within reason - tools, food, clothing etc.

Reply

Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Would love to see a gear article on NSMB fave helmet lights. I love my lezyne bar light, but my helmet light (glow-worm) requires a wire and battery I wear on my belt, not ideal!

Reply

Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Thanks very much!!

Reply

jt
JT
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Todd Hellinga

Hangover. Dear lord is that an amazing bit of light. The bang:buck ratio is insanely high IME. Batteries can be had at near any battery store and aren't hardwired into the unit for when they need to be replaced nor do they have special circuitry, seems waterproof enough (one deluge doesn't make a good test), and holy light spread. I used to think bucket lights that had a spotlight beam were tops. This kicked the legs out from that thought. I'm sure opinions are varied, but if you want to ride fast in the woods in the dark this really needs to be mounted on top of your noggin. It completely changed my night rides.

Reply

FlipFantasia
Todd Hellinga
2 months ago
0

yup, I love my outbound setup! the beam pattern is amazing and changed my night riding experiences a lot as well! I put a gopro mount on mine and works so good on the helmet, and it's sleek enough to fit in my small fanny pack or even pocket in a pinch.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.