oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07626.jpg
Bigger & Better

Oakley Sutro Review

Words A.J. Barlas
Photos A.J. Barlas
Date Aug 23, 2021
Reading time

For riders who have been looking for riding glasses that resemble a goggle lens with arms, the time has finally arrived with several strong options to choose from. The first decently sized pair of riding glasses I tried was the 100% Speedcraft, released around 2014/15. Despite their claimed dimensions, I haven't found them to offer the coverage of some recent models, like the Oakley Sutro.

If you ride with bare eyeballs, you may wonder what all the fuss is about. When your eyes are covered, stray branches, rocks, dust, and most other foreign objects are kept at bay. Until the Sutro, I had always found my vision obscured by the frame, and objects were somehow still able to get to my eyes. I often chose to ride with frameless glasses like the Oakley EVZero but the coverage was still less than ideal. Some of these problems stem from the shape of my face and nose, but it's tough to argue that increased coverage doesn’t offer more protection.

Highlights:

  • Available with Oakley’s Prizm Lens technology
  • Large lens improves peripheral vision
  • Oakley’s tough O-Matter™ frame material
  • No-slip nosepads
  • Thin temple of arm improves clearance with helmet
  • Not available for prescription lenses
  • "Asian fit" available
  • Optimal precision and impact resistance that meets or exceed ANSI Z80.3 optical and impact standards
  • MSRP: 173 USD / 208 CAD
    • Clear lens/White frame option available for 143 USD / 168 CAD
self-portrait-8t5mm52weeks-wk1-020121-ajbarlas-07741.jpg

The Sutro's were used in this self portrait for a photography challenge during the winter. Even with my busted up nose, they fit well and offer the best coverage I've had yet.

The Sutro

I was surprised to discover the Sutro's measurements more closely matched others I’ve been using. They’re actually 1 mm shorter than the Oakley Flight Jacket I reviewed in 2019 and according to the numbers, offer less coverage. But similar to flat pedals, I’m learning the shape has at least as much impact on coverage as the measurements themselves.

Aside from glasses like the Speedcraft, Smith Wildcat or newer models like the Shift MAG or Poc Devour – which both look like excellent large coverage options – the lens height often drops quickly as it moves away from the centre. This cuts down on coverage at the outer edges, which gives foreign matter an opportunity to exploit.

Taller lenses result in better coverage and I'm finding the taller and more square they are, the better. After spending heaps of time peering down the trail through the Oakley Flight Jacket, Jaw Breaker, and EVZeros, I can confidently say the Sutro is the best pair of Oakley glasses I’ve used. And aside from the others mentioned above, there aren’t many that provide a nice big, square lens to protect the eyes.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07698.jpg

Oakley pay homage to their 80's Eyeshade glasses in the nose bridge support, which the Sutro is claimed to be based on.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07680.jpg

Oakley has updated the nose piece, making it larger and wider than other options. It still uses their "Unobtanium" material, which is claimed to become stickier when in contact with a rider's hot, sweaty face. I haven't had any issues with movement from the Sutro.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07694.jpg

I haven't experienced any issues with the thinner, longer arms and helmet retention systems of the Oakley DRT5, Specialized Ambush, TLD A1 or Giro Tyrant helmets but it is possible the extra length could cause problems with some helmets.

Slipping the Sutro on for my first descent with the clear lens, I was surprised by how unobtrusive they were and caught myself trying to find the frame for reference. This continued for a few rides until wearing the Sutro became less interesting. Finding the frame was a conscious decision and other than the lower portion, it was an exercise that stretched the muscles at the back of my eyes. When riding, I didn't notice the lower frame unless something about my front tire drew my eyes down.

I rarely climb for extended periods wearing glasses, but there were no issues with fog when I did. If I left the Sutros on after a moderate effort, a slight fog would build above the nose piece between the eyes, but it was quick to clear once they were removed or shortly after I began rolling again.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07678.jpg

The Prizm technology is interesting. For riders often under thick forest canopies, all but the Prizm low-light option are too dark.

Lenses: Prizm vs Clear

As with other Oakley lenses, clarity is excellent regardless of tint. I. had a poor experience with an aftermarket lens for another pair of Oakleys, and I realized all optics are most certainly not created equal. I don’t understand the science, but wearing a pair of cheap glasses, (or knockoff lenses) doesn’t offer the same, clear vision provided by the Oakley. I've also had similar, less than optimal experiences with name-brand lenses of other similarly priced glasses in the past.

When the Sutros arrived, they had a pair of Prizm Jade lenses fitted. They looked flashy and I enjoyed the vision they provided when worn casually but they were too dark on the trail. Under the canopy, the clear lenses provide the best vision but I've enjoyed the Prizm low-light lenses from Oakley as well.

oakley-sutro-nsmb-review-090921-ajbarlas-09104.jpg

The clear Oakley lens offered incredible clarity compared to clear lenses from other brands and worked great in the dark forests of the PNW.

oakley-flight-jacket-prizm-glasses-120219-ajbarlas-01153.jpg

The Prizm low-light lens is great when riding in most conditions, but still cuts a bit too much light when it's really dank on the trails.

Supply chain issues have impacted the availability of some lenses, including those for the Sutro, and sourcing a Prizm low-light wasn't possible. I was able to find a clear lens and purchased that for the review. I’ve not worn another clear lens with as much clarity and combined with the large size, I’m occasionally left wondering if I forgot to slide them on before dropping. Some glasses I’ve used still need to be removed even with a clear lens in super dank lighting. The Sutro is the first pair of glasses where I haven’t needed to do that. And despite using clear lenses from many other brands, these are my first Oakleys.

The Prizm low-light lenses I've used with other frames have been fantastic and I enjoy the subtle contrast added by the technology. But there’s something to be said for the unaltered view of a good clear lens. Everything looks as it does to the naked eye but with the added protection from low-hanging branches and other trail hazards. And when it’s dark in the forest, the shift from the low-light Prizm lens cuts more light than the clear.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07626.jpg

On paper, the measurements of the Sutro and Flight Jacket (below) are similar but the rectangular shape of the Sutro offers heaps more coverage.

oakley-flight-jacket-prizm-glasses-120219-ajbarlas-02153.jpg

The Flight Jacket is claimed to be a touch taller than the Sutro but the thick frame and sport shape doesn't offer the uninterrupted view of the Sutro.

Size Improvements

While large coverage eyewear choices are improving, some helmets have failed to evolve and could interfere with the top of the frame when the trail gets rough. I’m not sure if my head isn’t as stable, if helmet fitment has changed, the MIPs tech is now moving more freely, or if my longer, often cleaner hair is to blame, but the Jaw Breaker glasses and DRT5 helmet had begun arguing on the trail occasionally, leaving me to mediate the conflict. No amount of helmet or eyewear adjusting could remedy the issue without separating the two in these situations.

Moving to the Sutro stopped the occasional chatter above my brow while providing a larger lens to hide behind. The arms are longer and slimmer, which has improved stability on my head, despite there being no rubber texture across the temple. They’re also thinner and interfere less with various helmets around the ear. An example is the TLD A1, which contacts the arm of many glasses I’ve tried just behind the ear. The Giro Tyrant also fails to play well with some but fits the Sutro very well.

Despite their larger presence, the Sutro frame is more slender than other Oakleys with similarly-sized lenses. It fits better with more helmets and I’ve found them more stable when the bronco starts to buck. Best of all, the frame does a better job of hiding from view. A black frame helps, its dark colour blending with much of the riding environment.

oakley-sutro-prizm-glasses-020121-ajbarlas-07687.jpg

Oakley used to be among the more expensive choices and while they still aren't cheap, similar products from Smith and POC come with a higher price tag. The clear lens option for 143 USD / 168 CAD is. solid value.

Conclusion

I take the protection of glasses as seriously as a helmet when riding. Oakley’s Sutro lens is the closest I’ve come to eye protection that goes unnoticed. They’re comfortable to wear and provide plenty of protection with little flash, with a clear lens at least.

My better half also says these are the least ridiculous-looking riding glasses I have, and if the wife says, it must be. That's a bonus because for what seems like an eternity, riding glasses have been the dorkiest of dorky. Looks are subjective, but I find the crop of squarer, large coverage choices look far less silly and in my experience, they're more functional too.

More on the Oakley Sutro.

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Vikb
+4 Pete Roggeman Andy Eunson Dan Endur-Bro
Vik Banerjee  - Aug. 23, 2021, 5:42 a.m.

I've owned a number of Oakleys over the years as well as other sunglasses from mid-priced shades to gas station cheapies. I don't regret the $$ I've spent on Oakleys. The optics are great, they are durable and I've even been able to buy replacement parts to keep glasses going for the long haul. 

My current riding glasses are some Jawbreakers with the photochromatic lens that adjusts nicely from deep forest in the winter to sunny clear cut/road. 

The Sutros look good. I've had them in mind to snag when I see a sale on them in a colour lens combo I like.

The self-portrait challenge photo....is that Blue Steel or Le Tigre?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+3 Vik Banerjee AJ Barlas Dan
Pete Roggeman  - Aug. 23, 2021, 6:14 a.m.

I'm calling Blue Steel all the way.

Great photos, AJ!

Reply

bailey100
0
william bailey  - Aug. 24, 2021, 7:03 a.m.

There's no way that was Blue Steel, it' still in development.

Reply

Zero-cool
0
Zero-cool  - Aug. 23, 2021, 10:43 a.m.

They’re not as good with replacement parts as they used to. Replacement arms seem to be their downfall nowadays. But I can’t fault the quality of the glasses even if they are ‘designed in the USA’ rather than ‘made in USA’ like they used to be.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:22 p.m.

Interesting. Has what you’ve noticed with replacements since COVID or does it pre-date that?

Reply

Spaztic
+3 Dogl0rd Sandy James Oates Todd Hellinga
Spaztic  - Aug. 23, 2021, 6:52 a.m.

General question for you sweat-heads: how do you manage sweat and condensation on the ride up, to keep it off the inside of your lenses?

Glasses on helmet, front or back, get condensation on them.

Wear them, sweat drips off my forehead on to the inside of the lens.

Even if I can keep glasses dry on the way up, squeeze out the foam liner of my helmet at the top and wipe my forehead as best I can, sweat drips off my forehead on to the inside of the lens on the ride down. It's infuriating.

I'm guessing some sort of headband?

Stop being a sweaty beast?

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Aug. 23, 2021, 6:57 a.m.

I know folks that like these. I don't sweat enough to benefit. Cheap enough to be worth a try.

https://tinyurl.com/fjw57vsw

Reply

fartymarty
+2 kcy4130 AJ Barlas
fartymarty  - Aug. 23, 2021, 7:16 a.m.

I'd be interested to hear peoples answers on this one as I've given up wearing glasses riding because I sweat so much - altho I know I should be wearing glasses.

Reply

kcy4130
0
kcy4130  - Aug. 23, 2021, 11:12 a.m.

Yeah, I usually don't wear glasses for the same reason. But sometimes in winter when there's snow and bright sunshine, (i.e. snow blindness conditions) dark glasses are absolutely required. In that case my glasses fog up and I get to choose between not being able to see due to completely fogged up glasses and not being able to see because the sun reflecting off the snow is blinding my unprotected eyes. Just one of several reasons why winter biking (around here in mt) is a lot more challenging than summer, most of them gear related.

Reply

Wilson
+1 AJ Barlas
Wilson  - Aug. 23, 2021, 8:36 a.m.

My tld a2 was awful for this, but the neoprene strip on the a3 does a really good job of directing the sweat off to the temples. Before getting on to these glasses I struggled to find anything good to pair with contact lenses. Goggles are best, but not so practical in the summer heat. The sutro is a perfect balance of airflow and coverage. I still stash them on my helmet for long sustained climbs btw.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 23, 2021, 9:26 a.m.

People talk about vents and cooling but more important is sweat management. Back when I was a road racer before real helmets, I wore a thick headband only. I still sweated a lot. The headband could be wrung out periodically too. Still wasn’t perfect though. People say oh helmets make me sweat. No. Going hard makes you sweat. 

I like big lenses too. I have those same Flight jackets. With the advancer thing they work really well. But they can interfere with the helmet. That is something with how helmets fit me though. It’s important to take your eye ware with you when trying helmets on and vice versa.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:27 p.m.

Great point! Taking the eyewear with you is such a good idea. It would be horrible to get home with a new lid only to discover it doesn’t fit with your glasses.

Reply

Timer
0
Timer  - Aug. 23, 2021, 11:14 a.m.

I buy riding glasses which don't sit too close to the face. That helps a lot in my case. Most sports glasses don't seem designed for slow, sweaty mtb riding. They sit too close and touch my eyebrows or forehead, which then channel sweat onto the glass.

Reply

Gunnar-man
+2 AJ Barlas Andy Eunson
Gunnar-man  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:16 p.m.

I have used the Halo head bands before but started using these a few years ago with great success.  They can be a tight fit under some helmets, though.  

They really helped keep the sweat off my eyes.

https://www.traxfactory.com/

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 Andy Eunson
AJ Barlas  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:31 p.m.

Calling my friend, Andy. There are some great sweat management options being discussed here.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 23, 2021, 2:29 p.m.

Got those. They work but as you say, might not fit in helmets that are just right in the fit department. Take an extra one along for going down. I found a face cloth on the trail the other day which I assume someone was bringing to wipe the sweat off prior to a decent and had dropped it. Mine now. I washed it and use it thusly.

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Aug. 23, 2021, 2:58 p.m.

So you think Trax are better than Halo? Been using Halo for years and just started using their thicker X3 version, which is killer.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 24, 2021, 8:17 a.m.

Way better in my limited experience with Halo. The rubber strip sort of directs sweat to the sides but overwhelm the Halo when it’s warm. Plus it takes up too much space in some of my helmets.

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Aug. 23, 2021, 2:56 p.m.

For sweatband, Halo X3 (thickest) is killer! Also regular Halo. Skip the Halo Air as it's useless when you're really sweating.

Glasses on back for climbing (have A3, but similar with my A2 or A1) and always carry a cleaning cloth in a ziplock (so it can't get contaminated by other sweaty gear) to clean em off if need be during the ride or before the descent.

That'll take care of your issues.

Reply

Spaztic
+2 Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas
Spaztic  - Aug. 23, 2021, 6:37 p.m.

Thanks for all the feedback.

Glad to hear that I'm not the only sweat hog, and jealous of those who don't have to contend with it.

Seems like some sort of headband option is the way to go.

Reply

Lornholio
+2 Andy Eunson Metacomet
Lornholio  - Aug. 24, 2021, 12:43 a.m.

I used a Halo headband for a couple of years.  Works well but looks ridiculous when worn and even worse when removed as it leaves a line on your forehead, so leaving your helmet on for post-ride drinks is the least bad option.  But hey, if you're considering these Macho Man Randy Savage glasses maybe you don't care about things like that...

A Sweatbuster helmet pad has been working very well for me for the last 5 years or so in several helmets and makes a Troy Lee A1 even comfier.  Easy to remove and wring out in a stream or water fountain mid-ride or throw in the wash regularly.  Check it out.

Reply

SlurpyTurkey
+2 Metacomet Andy Eunson
Julian Sammons  - Aug. 24, 2021, 9:59 a.m.

Look up the "Sweat Buster" on Amazon. Best $14 I've ever spent,. now running them in all my helmets. Replaces the front part of the foam insert in any helmet (you have to cut it out). You can take it out, clean/wring it and throw it back in in seconds. It looks like it could keep your head too warm, but I've had no such issue. Aside from the sweat issue it solves, I actually found the biggest benefit is it makes all my helmets far more comfortable and snug. I was always disintegrating those foam pads, they'd get all salty from sweat, and I'd end up getting forehead rashes unless I wanted to deal with cleaning the pad and putting it back in each ride. Can't. Recommend. This. Thing. Enough.

Reply

hbelly13
+1 kcy4130
Raymond Epstein  - Aug. 24, 2021, 6:46 p.m.

I've tried both the Veos and the Gutrs along with the silicon strip gutter included with my Oakley DRT5 helmet. Those were all okay at best, but I'm a sweaty creep riding in the deep south. Every one of them would get overwhelmed with sweat pooling only to dump into my eyes just as I am dropping into something where seeing ahead of me would be helpful to put it lightly. The absolute best I've found are Wickflow headbands. They cost less than any of the others and blow all of them away in terms of performance. They are dumb simple which is the genius of them combing a super thin moisture wicking headband with a small silicone bead that channels your sweat out to your temples continuously. All I can say is they are the only sweat control headband that allows me to keep glasses on throughout my rides in the blast furnace Georgia heat.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 25, 2021, 9:30 a.m.

Ordered. If they don’t work as you say, I’m looking to you for a refund. Hahaha just kidding.

Reply

Spaztic
+2 Raymond Epstein Andy Eunson
Spaztic  - Aug. 25, 2021, 9:45 a.m.

Haha - me too! Impulse bought the double pack last night.

Raymond, your sales pitch sealed the deal.

@NSMB - sounds like a sweat hog headband shootout could be a helpful article.

Reply

hbelly13
+2 AJ Barlas Andy Eunson
Raymond Epstein  - Aug. 25, 2021, 10:52 a.m.

A few things I've found with the Wickflows. First, DO NOT WASH/DRY them. This instantly ruins the silicone channel. I simply wring them out at the end of a ride and then spray them with a combo of water/essential oil to let them air dry. No funk, no problems. Second, wear them low on your forehead so they literally are no more than a few mm or less from your eyebrows. Third, your helmet needs to fit snug up against it as it does not work as well if your lid is loose. The less internal padding the better. My Oakley DRT5 is especially good for this as it has hardly any pads. Fourth, you'll still need to lean your head back, push on the front of your helmet to allow larger amounts of sweat to drain.  Lastly, no I do not work for nor am I sponsored by Wickflow. However, when I come across something exceptional I share. I bought a friend one and he was blown away with it. I am all in on being a sweat hog headband tester. The saying "Hotter than Georgia asphalt" has been around for a long time for a reason.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+2 Raymond Epstein Andy Eunson
AJ Barlas  - Aug. 25, 2021, 11:27 a.m.

Just what I was thinking as I read through these comments. Thanks to everyone helping with suggestions based on their sweat management experiences. It's great to see the community step in to help each other like this!

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Raymond Epstein
Pete Roggeman  - Aug. 25, 2021, 11:36 a.m.

I was thinking the same thing. I'm going to try these at Raymond's suggestion. The other resident sweaty bastard - Andrew - may have opinions about them as well.

Reply

hbelly13
0
Raymond Epstein  - Aug. 24, 2021, 6:46 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

Andeh
+3 Andy Eunson AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman
Andeh  - Aug. 23, 2021, 9:25 a.m.

I get the appeal of wanting "normal" looking glasses, but unfortunately they just never seem to vent as well as the dorky looking ones.  I got a pair of Flight Jackets after your review of those, and with the vent switch open, I can pedal with them for hours in 80%+ humidity without fogging up.  They actually only ever fog up when I take them off and rest them on my leg while I'm wringing the sweat out of my helmet.

Reply

andy-eunson
+2 Timer Pete Roggeman
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 23, 2021, 9:29 a.m.

Exactly. It’s the same preference for cycling shoes that don’t look like cycling shoes. If glasses don’t look dorky, they don’t work well on a bike. Meanwhile, people wear goggles with half shell helmets.

Reply

morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Aug. 23, 2021, 10:25 a.m.

Has anyone found a good solution for prescription riding glasses?

Reply

trumpstinyhands
0
trumpstinyhands  - Aug. 23, 2021, 12:44 p.m.

My Ryders ones are fine for me. I didn't get fancy lenses, just normal ones that the optometrist had and they fog a bit if you stop at the top of a climb, but I just sometimes takes them off at the top, give them a quick breather and put them back on just before I 'drop in'. They have the added benefit of not looking 'enduro'.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:30 p.m.

The Ryders glasses I’ve tried were really quite good, too and the only thing to offer similar clarity to the last couple of pairs tested from Oakley. Ryder’s Fyre lens is quite special.

Reply

cheapondirt
0
cheapondirt  - Aug. 23, 2021, 6:38 p.m.

Ok, so they look absolutely the dumbest, but prescription safety glasses (the wraparound style, not the old man style) are doing it for me. Nothing solid has gotten around the pair I've been using this summer. I get some wind in the eyes at bike park speeds, but still prefer it over the optical misery that is goggles over glasses.

Reply

morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Aug. 24, 2021, 4:14 p.m.

I've got a pair of sport specs, but they're too close to my face, so they fog up and/or get covered in sweat.

Reply

morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Aug. 24, 2021, 4:14 p.m.

I've got a pair of sport specs, but they're too close to my face, so they fog up and/or get covered in sweat.

Reply

araz
0
araz  - Aug. 24, 2021, 9:29 p.m.

I've gotten really good results getting lenses done at Sports Optical in Denver. They ship, at least in the US -- I don't live there. I have some older Smith Overdrive glasses that they've done a couple of sets of prescription lenses for. Those glasses have good wrap and coverage, and I don't believe were made to be RXable, and the Sports Optical folks didn't have an issue with them. If you find some glasses that you like and that fit well, it's worth calling them up to see if they can put prescription lenses in them. Obviously glasses with a single lens like these Oaklys won't work, and there's limits depending on how strong your prescription is.

Reply

4Runner1
0
4Runner1  - Aug. 25, 2021, 4:17 p.m.

After years of struggling to find appropriate glasses, I’ve been pretty happy with my Oakley Half Jacket 2.0’s. I use the “trail” lenses and they work well in all but the darkest of daylight conditions.

Look a little dorky but could care less.

Reply

cyclotoine
+1 AJ Barlas
cyclotoine  - Aug. 23, 2021, 1:50 p.m.

Those look good. If they can be had with a photochromatic lenses that doesn't increase the cost like crazy I am in. I only wear photochromatic, everything else is off the table. I want one pair of glasses for every ride and for the last few years the Ryders Fyre lens in whatever that most popular shape is for MTB (reviewed on NSMB and purchased after that) have been doing the job but they're pretty tired. I noticed a new Ryder's frame at the LBS that looks really good but they only had them in a tinted lens with white frame. I don't even see them online yet but if they offer those in a photochromatic lens they will likely be my next pair of mtb glasses.

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Aug. 23, 2021, 3:02 p.m.

Just swapped into the Sutros from Flight Jackets and really like them. However, 2 negatives - super crappy lens choices right now (no Low Light, which is my main lens) and lack of unobtainium socks on the arms. I actually hacked up a couple old extra Oakley ear sock spares I had lying around and shoved them on my 2prs of Sutros so that the Sutros stay stuck in my helmet while climbing. I know that Oakley added unobtainium to Sutro Lite I think? Wish it was on the regular Sutro.

Reply

Tadpoledancer
0
Tadpoledancer  - Aug. 24, 2021, 8:37 p.m.

I’m pretty keen on the Sutro Lite as that seems to be perfect, but the lack of lens choices is really holding me back. As far as I can see there is no clear lens yet which is what works where I live.

Reply

mhaager2
+1 cheapondirt
Moritz Haager  - Aug. 23, 2021, 3:41 p.m.

I really wish they would make glasses like these for prescription lens wearers. I can't stand contacts.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Aug. 23, 2021, 4:08 p.m.

Reply

rndholesqpeg
+2 Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas
rndholesqpeg  - Aug. 23, 2021, 4:47 p.m.

I mean if they are good enough for Rossi, they must be good enough for us mere mortals 

But thanks AJ for the review, I was on the fence on ordering them, and just pulled the plug

Reply

ReductiMat
+1 Andy Eunson
ReductiMat  - Aug. 24, 2021, 12:51 p.m.

I’m waiting for the arms to be 0.1mm thinner and 15% stiffer before I invest.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.