Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 Light NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG
REVIEW

Night Riding Needs: The Blackburn Dayblazer 1500

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Oct 15, 2021
Reading time

Promises, Promises

I can taste battery acid. Not because I've had Blackburn's new Dayblazer 1500 in my mouth. This is sadly much, much worse than sucking on plug-in electronics. I just almost typed the word 'disrupting' to describe this light system. Now I'm thinking about burying it on the trail somewhere and denying it ever arrived.

It's not entirely my fault. You see, I've been waiting for this light for a long time. Ever since NiteRider introduced their TriNewt LED to compete with finicky HID systems. Ever since Light & Motion introduced their self-contained Taz. And most especially, ever since I rode Bontrager's Ion Pro RT.

For years, complex multi-part light systems ruled the night for anyone who is serious about night riding. Especially anyone serious about regularly night riding on North Shore trails in the pissing rain. For years, self-contained lights have been evolving toward the point where they would render multi-part systems overpriced and obsolete, for all but the most aggressive 'daylight-at-night' mountain bikers.

Blackburn's new Dayblazer 1500 throws a bold beam with great colour for 95 USD. And it runs on high - or what they call 'Blitz' - for two full hours in the pouring rain at 7°C.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 NSMB AndrewM.JPG

The 95 USD kit includes the 1500 lumen Dayblazer, rubber strap, and a GoPro mount. I ran it on the same GoPro helmet jig I use with all my headlamps.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

Construction is identical to the Dayblazer 1100 I previously reviewed. It uses a lightweight finned aluminum body & plastic head for heat management.

I have a couple of high-end light systems from 3-5 years ago, each with batteries and bulbs connected with a cord. Both have plenty of life in the batteries and the LEDs are good. And the more impressive unit, also rated at 1500 lumens (both ANSI FL1), has a very big beam. Unfortunately, they both have shorts, presumably in the head units, and I haven't managed to sort out either of them. They're well out of warranty, the manufacturer doesn't offer service anymore, and it was a defect in rider skill and judgment not materials or manufacturing that caused the issues. I could purchase new head units to run on the batteries, but I've decided to fix them or recycle them because I'd rather have self-contained units if given a choice.

I've been out in the woods with this Dayblazer 1500 on my head and the solid L&M Seca Comp 2000 on my handlebar and I really can't see spending more on lights. And in a given year, I use my lights more than enough to amortize investing in the right setup.

The Seca has a bright flood beam that complements the more focused light of the Dayblazer 1500. It runs an honest 90 minutes on the high setting where the Dayblazer will pump out 120 minutes. I generally turn off the Seca entirely on climbs and cycle down the Dayblazer, so I have yet to run out of battery on any ride I've done.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

I love that there's no pesky little hard-to-remove charger cover and no faffing about with the mount itself to get a cable in.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

Just pull the rubber plug and insert a micro USB cable. It's the best system I've used in this regard. A full recharge takes about 5 hours.

If I was buying lights tomorrow, I would have a hard time not choosing a pair of Dayblazer 1500s over my current Dayblazer/Seca setup. It just comes down to a 95 v. 230 USD unit cost or a system cost of 190 v. 325 USD. There's no ride I'm doing where I wouldn't be totally happy with a pair of Dayblazers despite the Seca's broader beam. I hope we see an updated runtime, reduced weight, or lower cost from L&M in the future to reflect updated technology.

With much respect to the folks I know trying to ride after hours at top speed on DH bikes like it's daytime, I night ride as much as most folks and I ride fairly technical terrain (though a step down from my regular daytime routine) and I can't fathom spending over 300 USD for a system again. The Blackburn is bright, simple, durable, and robust, and if I smash it I can afford to replace it.

The light the Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 has largely replaced is my Bontrager Ion Pro (1300 lumen) and it's still getting close* to the specified 1.5 hours of runtime on high, a full three years since I first tested it. I carry it as a spare when my daughter's not using it on the trails.

*I plan to run it out from a full charge to determine exactly how long it runs after 3 years of use.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 Light NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

The system is rated as waterproof for immersion up to 1 metre for 30 minutes. So it's good for the wettest nights in Raincouver.

Blackburn Dayblazer 1500 NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

To give this unit a proper test I've been riding with it mounted down low on the control arm of my cargo bike. Lots of grit and puddles on the local bike routes.

I would never advocate going out into the woods with one light system. I have friends who don't carry a backup or rely on an old secondary light and they've yet to have a problem but I don't want to spend a night alone in the woods or make a Search & Rescue call, so I always have two systems I completely trust and a third light source - that isn't my cellphone - for hiking out.

Night riding is increasingly inexpensive and it's accessible for folks who don't have the flexible work and family schedules that allow them to get in a daytime lap before dusk when the days are short. I enjoy being in the woods alone at night, but for anyone who doesn't I've never found it hard to find fellow travelers - at least on a nice evening.

95 USD for the Dayblazer is the best value I've found in an offroad light source to date when I consider the quality of light for the runtime. The fact that I can use it regularly for commuting, usually in a lower setting, is a bonus.

More information on the Blackburn Dayblazer 1500

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Comments

ReubenSandwich
+1 Andrew Major
ReubenSandwich  - Oct. 15, 2021, 2:56 a.m.

Interesting...

I'm running a L&M Seca 2200 enduro on the bars and an older Seca 1700 race on the helmet as I have long subscribed to the "daylight at night" idea. The 1700 is starting to show its age a little; decreased run time, insulation has broken down on the cable from absorbing sweat where I run it through my helmet. 

I've looked at a few options (namely Outbound) but the run time and/or light output makes me hesitant but low weight is so tempting! Especially when you add a ~300g light head to 400g helmet. Do you know what the weight is of this Andrew?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 ReubenSandwich
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 5:55 a.m.

I was long a system rider too. Just to have enough light to see jumbled roots and pick the less greasy lines down rocks at all.

Kept wrecking extension cables - which is apparently a me thing - which is when I switched to a self contained helmet / system on the bar setup. I figure the next gen Seca Comp will be lighter and run longer, so excited for that. No more cords!

The advantage of systems is, of course, not having the battery on your head. The Dayblazer is light though. They claim 140-grams. I’ll toss it on a scale and confirm this morning.

Reply

smoothjazzlines
0
smoothjazzlines  - Oct. 15, 2021, 11:45 a.m.

I recently retired a 2010 vintage set of Magicshines and picked up a Evo DH setup from Outbound and it's a joy to use. So light. So much light. I haven't found run time to ever be an issue for me. Fairly short 3ish hour rides. PNW fire road climb situations being what they are, high beams only go on for the descent. And the Outbounds are in stock... sooo. Really fun product to use. No external batteries is wonderful.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 2:46 p.m.

With the GoPro mount bolted on (ready to clip on to the stick-on receiver on my helmet) its 146-grams.

Pretty freakin’ light for 1500-lumens / 2hrs running.

Reply

vincentaedwards
+2 Andrew Major Cr4w
Vincent Edwards  - Oct. 15, 2021, 6:34 a.m.

Wow, that’s a lot of light for $95 - I might need to check this one out.

I’ve been pretty impressed with the outbound hangover light. 105g +20g for the mount. Medium is plenty bright for general riding. I’d describe the beam pattern as spot + flood. It’s not as big and even as a Seca 2000 system, but it’s great as a helmet light. 

I’d say nearly 1/3 of riders are now using the hangover on our weekly night rides. 

I go back and forth between Taz 1200 and Seca 2000 system on the bars, depending on the ride. I’ve  been tempted to pick up the Seca Comp, but as you mentioned the price/performance seems to be lagging this year.

Considering the weight and price of this Blackburn, I could see running two on the bars. Having 3 of the same light would provide plenty of backup - redundancy. And would still cost under $300

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 6:49 a.m.

Outbound certainly crashed into the market with strong marketing and an interesting product. I have a few friends using their helmet/bar combo with good results aside from some handlebar mount failures. When it’s dank and technical it’s they’re certainly running full-juice though.

I expected L+M and NiteRider to have updated self-contained systems this year to take another step but, at least in NR’s case, they traditionally release new stuff in spring (capture the summer night riding season in the hotter parts of the USA) and with ‘rona lots of releases are delayed a year.

My Seca Comp rubber strap died in a crash, which is an annoyance. I’ve been running it for ages in a classic (awesome) NiteRider Universal mount. I still think it’s a great all-in-one bar light but hadn’t considered just running paired Dayblazers.

With the Blackburn I can run.a lower setting at climbing speed but I run full-on coming down trails. Once it starts raining I find the forest eats any light.

Reply

DanL
+1 Andrew Major
DanL  - Oct. 15, 2021, 9:28 a.m.

I picked up the outbound set as well, they've been great, excellent customer support but If I see you out there in the dank it'd be great to compare lumens. (I imagine a set of two mounted either side of the helmet on the chinbar in full Orbital manner would be pretty spectacular)

Reply

ReubenSandwich
+1 Pete Roggeman
ReubenSandwich  - Oct. 16, 2021, 2:27 a.m.

I've always wondered how the Outbound helmet light would compare to the Seca as far as beam pattern and output. 

The Outbound marketing sounds like they have an inferior product that they are trying to drum up when they talk about not listing output and how "your eyes will adjust". They should list a Lux value (the amount of light measured at a given distance from the light source) as that actually has real-world use whereas lumens are more a theoretical or calculated output (and therefore a bit shit really).

I have a lux meter built into one of my multimeters (I'm an electrician) and have in the past measured the amount of light my various light systems put out in spot and peripheral positions.  My old bar light was home made LED and was better than the bought ones I'd copied off!

*EDIT* I see outbound do actually list an approx output now of 900- 1000 lumens for the hangover lamp.

Reply

Vikb
+1 Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:14 a.m.

I've got a couple long suffering Dinotte lights with head units + separate batteries. The batteries have lost a lot of capacity so I really need to buy either two new ones or at least one new one and then the 2nd light can have 2 older batteries. Given a single battery is $121CAD + $61 shipping it's tempting to try something like this all in one unit and given up on the old lights. Analysis paralysis! 

My crappy getting worse eyes lean me in the direction of maximum light firepower.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Vik Banerjee
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:24 a.m.

Sometimes it’s nice to have a big flood lamp on the bar but beyond that 2000-lumens is plenty bright. Lighter, smaller, less expensive is the future. 

If you’d bought a top end system five years ago it would still be plenty bright today, but lamps like this Dayblazer are the future. $95 USD! It’s just so much more convenient to pack along all the time (I always bring a light in the shorter-season as dusk hits quick) and the quality of the lamp is similar.

Reply

rigidjunkie
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
Allen Lloyd  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:22 a.m.

5 years ago I bought a NR self contained unit.  It cost a bit less than half my prior system, weighed was less than half and had 1/3 the parts needed to ride (old one was light, cable, and battery vs. new self contained unit).  Ohh and it was double the lumens.  For all the talk about increasing bike prices, light prices seem to be the opposite and I think the products have advanced even more.  

I am due for a new light again and I have been a loyal NR customer, I hope they come out with new stuff and do some crazy sales on the current stuff.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:35 a.m.

NR make great products - I’ve owned their systems and I use their rear flashers all the time - but they are definitely overdue for a refresh on their self contained Lumina units:

Light, brighter, longer running.

I mean, the current brightest Lumina (1800) only pumps out max output for 45mins and 1500 lumens for 1.5hrs (Dayblazer 1500 = 2hrs) and weighs 258grams (Dayblazer 140grams) and costs $170 USD (Dayblazer $95 USD).

I wonder if some of the disruption coming from the Bontragers and Blackburns out there is that they haven’t been selling expensive systems previously? It’s a big change in revenue per unit selling a Dayblazer 1500 v. a Pro 2200.

Anyways, I would count on them to release updated self-contained systems this Spring. I would never count them out. I’ve relied on their lights to get me through the woods for years with good results.

Reply

DadStillRides
0
DadStillRides  - Oct. 21, 2021, 5:03 a.m.

NR now makes a lumina 2500, but only lasts 30 min on max output. 216 grams

Reply

Shoreloamer
0
Greg Bly  - Oct. 15, 2021, 10:56 a.m.

Chances are the tiny protection circut connected to the sealed battery failed. Common occurrence. Then what? Throw it in the garbage? 

I have bike lights with batteries I can take out and charge. I can also bring spare batteries for unlimited riding. 

Maybe a bike light investment should have more value than a disposable bic  lighter. 

How difficult is it to have a battery you can remove ? More important to save a dollar on cheaper assembly.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 2:50 p.m.

Hi Greg, the tiny protection circuit on what battery failed, sorry? If you’re talking about my systems that aren’t working they have separate batteries and the batteries are good. The shorts are in the wires/circuit in the head units (x2).

I would have agreed with you re. replaceable batteries (I like serviceable stuff) but I’ve had zero issues with any of the self-contained lights I’m using - Blackburn, Bontrager, L+M, etc. I’m going to run test my oldest Bontrager Ion Pro (three years old) and see how much run time has changed since new.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+2 Greg Bly Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - Oct. 15, 2021, 6:21 p.m.

If the batteries are 18650s you can buy wall wart chargers for them. And replace if required... Just some Johnny 5 disassemble / reassemble. No need to bin the whole unit.

Reply

Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - Oct. 16, 2021, 9:29 a.m.

Yep that's how I discovered the soldered 18650 in one of my trashed units.  

Batteries can be purchased on line for low $.

Reply

Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - Oct. 16, 2021, 9:25 a.m.

I'm going to guess that every single unit uses the same battery it's a 18650 lithium ion battery. Ranging from 1.5 to 3 amps.   The battery has a protection circut . So does the charging circut. To prevent fires . 

I have had one unit compleatly fail and another that never gave a full charge.  Yes warranty covers this. Warranty is rather pointless in the bush at night.  Purchased my units from MEC . 

How long would your Ion pro last if you used it every day, um night , for commuting? 

Cables failing is exactly why I would never use a separate battery.  Night rides and loose cables is a problem waiting to happen.  

Are you aware that all these single units  most likely use the exact same extremely common battery?  

When my battery is low on power I pop in a fresh one. Who wouldn't want that feature. ?  No need for battery conservation.  Full burn whenever I want.  And you probably have a story or two as I do of creeping home on low power.  Those days are over for me.

Reply

mammal
0
Mammal  - Oct. 19, 2021, 7:49 a.m.

Congratulations Greg Bly.

Reply

Shoreloamer
0
Greg Bly  - Oct. 15, 2021, 10:56 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

Shoreloamer
0
Greg Bly  - Oct. 15, 2021, 10:56 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

Bad-Sean
+1 Greg Bly
Sean Chee  - Oct. 15, 2021, 11:29 a.m.

I use nitecore torches for riding. They’re cheaper, use common batteries (21700’s on my newer torches), and are more useful off bike than dedicated bike lights. I’m currently using a HC35 (60 usd including battery) with a custom 3d printed helmet mount, and a MH12S (55usd inc battery) on my bars.

Reply

mikeynets
+1 Agleck7
mikeynets  - Oct. 15, 2021, 4:54 p.m.

I always try to double up gear for multiple uses and I've looked into several headlamps/flashlights like the Nitecore HC35. Mounting is always the catch, though.

Could you share the plans for your 3D printed helmet mount? I've never printed anything myself, but figured it's something I could send to a person or shop that has a printer?

Reply

Bad-Sean
+1 Agleck7
Sean Chee  - Oct. 16, 2021, 4:36 a.m.

I can do that. It's just a cradle that uses zip ties to secure the torch to it. It attaches to the helmet with gopro tines. I'm away from home for the next few weeks, but I will upload to thingiverse when I get back to that computer. I'm sure if you ask amongst your friends network, someone will have a 3d printer. 

The HC35 is a beast! It's my most used torch, the magnetic base being particularly handy. I just wish it could fit standard 1" accessories as I would like to fit a diffuser cone or red filter to it. I spend a lot of time doing astronomy and photography at night, the red light doesn't blow out your natural dark vision like a white light does. I do have another headlamp with an aux red led (NU25 I think it is), and the MH12S takes both the filter and diffuser, making it handy for doing general farm tasks at night. I just wish it had the magnetic base, but you can't have everything I guess!

Reply

Ripbro
+1 Andrew Major
Ripbro  - Oct. 15, 2021, 5:58 p.m.

Currency conversion is tough these days. 98 USD but most shops are selling these for $149CAD. I started night riding and have been contemplating going all in and purchasing a Gemini system, but maybe a few of these is a better choice.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 6:04 p.m.

Yeah, full disclosure that the reason I didn't include a Canadian SRP is that its silly beans. The dollar has been hovering close enough $0.80 for long enough that even accounting for the average higher costs of doing business in Canada (shipping, rents, wages, etc) that's a big difference to swallow. 

I'll throw out $125-$130 as a fair price to pay on this side of the border.

Reply

Ripbro
+1 Andrew Major
Ripbro  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:45 p.m.

Agreed. I’ll see if there are any Black Friday sales and hopefully pick one up for around that price.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Ripbro Martin
Andrew Major  - Oct. 15, 2021, 7:49 p.m.

I guess it depends on how/who you ask but I'd be surprised if any dealer wasn't happy to split the difference on CAD/USA SRP and sell you a light for $130. It's been a long time since I worked in or ran the front of house of a shop but certainly, and especially this time of year, we appreciated folks that wanted to help us keep the lights on instead of automatically ordering from an online store.

Reply

AJM
0
Alexis Morgan  - Oct. 16, 2021, 7:44 a.m.

Sounds solid. I suppose I'm struggling a bit these days with Blackburn/Giro/Vista being an ammunitions company and trying to spend dollars on the brands that align with my values (and no, I'm not seeking a gun debate - each into their own). Any hot tips for other solid choices beyond the Trek/Bontrager Ion?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 16, 2021, 10:09 a.m.

Reply

AJM
+2 DadStillRides Andrew Major
Alexis Morgan  - Oct. 16, 2021, 9:09 p.m.

Were that it were true Pete! Yes, they sold their gun business, but not their ammunition business (in fact they doubled down on it I believe).  Check out their website:

https://vistaoutdoor.com/brands/

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 21, 2021, 1:06 p.m.

Right you are, and I think I was being a bit lazy. They sold the gun biz (and it was the one that makes assault-style rifles that was controversial) not ammo, as you point out. Without going down that rabbit hole, or engaging in a debate about where the line is, I'll simply say that personally, I'm not against hunting* so the ammo thing isn't an issue for me, but respect the fact that it could be for you.

*when done responsibly, by people who eat what they hunt and respect conservation laws, etc

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 25, 2021, 4:58 p.m.

I appreciate folks with the courage of their convictions and spending money with companies whose politics align with your own - whatever they may be. Vote with your purchases for sure. And generally, that's all I'd have to say on the subject.

But, I have to say, in the specific case of many if not most mountain bikers I know who use ammunition manufacturing as a reason to avoid Vista brands there's something that often rings a bit hollow and it comes down to the exact objection. It's easy to not buy Vista - it's obvious which brands they own, and yeah - bullets are bullets - but is that where the exercise stops? 

For example, Fox Racing Shox manufacturers suspension for armoured vehicles - and other military uses - under Fox Defense. But it's not like they publish a client list so who knows what conflicts their suspension is being featured in? Does that stop you from buying Fox products or is it a big enough step removed? Would you consider it when purchasing a suspension product?

It gets even more opague when you start purchasing bikes that are manufacturer overseas (which is the vast, vast majority of them). Who, or in some cases what government, owns the factory where your frame was made? I don't know a soul who's gone that in-depth when purchasing a bicycle but I do know that it doesn't take more than 30-seconds on Google to figure out who is (or at least was) making carbon bikes in Myanmar. How in-depth did you research before buying your last bike?

Who's making say Bontrager's light system? Do they also make electronics for military applications? 

Please don't take it as a personal criticism, it's just something I feel the need to say in response to the usual, casual, dismissal of Vista. It could be a stepping stone to an individual being more aware of all their purchases but I feel like it's usually low-hanging fruit.

Reply

SpencerN
0
Spencer Nelson  - Oct. 16, 2021, 6:34 p.m.

Of course this review comes out a day after I buy a replacement battery for my cheapo (but bright) lights! Would've been enough to push me over the edge to abandon the corded setup. Ah, next year, maybe...

Reply

andrewbikeguide
+5 Andrew Major Martin ackshunW Greg Bly el_jefe
AndrewR  - Oct. 17, 2021, 12:36 p.m.

I switched to Lynx OGT Raven set up in 2020 (https://www.lynxogt.com/product-page/veblen) which is all Canadian made (Nelson BC), with the exception of the battery. 

For the price of one of the cheaper systems I have two head lamps (one for car and one for the house, or two for night riding), a bar mount, 2-3 helmet mounts and two spare 18650 batteries.

1800 lumens for 3.5 hrs so I can manage a full 0200 hrs depart for a Lord of the Squirrels sun rise mission and completely light up the night and know that I have an emergency reserve of light if I need it, even before committing to the spare batteries.

Useful as a guide for camp at night and all other reasons that an awesome head torch comes in handy.

The ability to set a variable (lower level) on the first setting is excellent and the SOS function is something that I hope I never have to use.

Reply

martin
+1 Greg Bly
Martin  - Oct. 17, 2021, 5:27 p.m.

Nice find! I like the versatility of the system too. It just joined the Fenix BC30 v2 on my want list. Thanks!

Reply

ackshunW
+1 Martin
ackshunW  - Oct. 18, 2021, 7:37 a.m.

Uh that light looks amazing, what’s the catch? 

Seriously ready to order that poste-haste .. to complete my research though, could you tell me your least favorite thing about it?

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Oct. 18, 2021, 8:26 a.m.

Get it! But see my other post - least favourite thing is the beam pattern with very defined line between spot and wide beam. But this is a GREAT headlamp. All my Petzl and Black Diamond headlamps sit unused now that I have the Raven

Reply

el_jefe
0
el_jefe  - Oct. 18, 2021, 8:24 a.m.

I have one as well and got a bunch for friends on a deal Lynx had a while. By far my most used headlamp - LOVE IT! You can get a GoPro mount for it too. I consider it an amazing back up for mtbiking, but personally prefer a bike-specific light that has a good beam pattern (which the Raven does not). Raven's biggest downside for riding is that the beam pattern is basically a very defined spot with a bunch of broad beam overspill. If you are used to using crappy lights with crap beam patterns, or just ride slow so aren't distracted by it, it's fine. But for dedicated mtb light, my preference is something with a better beam pattern (I use the Outbound EVO system Hangover and Trail).

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ackshunW
0
ackshunW  - Oct. 18, 2021, 8:57 a.m.

Aaarghh That’s too bad. Sounds like the light is still awesome, but the beam issue is virtually a deal-breaker for serious trail riding ( at speed anyway...?) 

Of course, no clue how it would compare to my old L&M setup. And regardless, I usually keep the tech and the speed dialed down at night. I’ve never had the confidence to go full-on (or maybe just never had enough good light?!)

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
0
Tjaard Breeuwer  - Oct. 17, 2021, 4:58 p.m.

What I don’t like is the tiny batteries on many of these lights. I don’t need some crazy amount of light, but I do need the ‘decent level of light’ to last my entire ride, with a margin of safety. 

Wh can’t we get a light with ~1200 lumen with a good beam pattern, but a 4 hour run time? Instead, they just keep putting brighter and brighter LEDs in there. 

Considering that most batteries perform far worse in the cold, and that my night riding happens in the winter, when it is below (often far below) freezing, ad I have a hard time abandoning separate battery and light set ups.

Reply

Bad-Sean
+1 Martin
Sean Chee  - Oct. 18, 2021, 6:20 a.m.

The nitecore hu60 might be the light you’re after if you prefer split systems. I expect an updated model will be arriving in the next six months. They even make nice handlebar mounts for it  

https://flashlight.nitecore.com/product/hu60

Reply

SteveR
+1 Andrew Major
SteveR  - Oct. 18, 2021, 12:57 p.m.

These self contained systems look appealing, but like Tjaard, my night riding is in the (Alberta) winter, almost always at well below freezing. Keeping batteries tucked into an inner pocket or close to my back in a pack makes a big difference. My trails are usually snow covered though, with the increased reflectivity allowing longer runtimes at lower settings.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Andrew Major
Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 21, 2021, 1:15 p.m.

I find that riding at night in snow makes for far less demanding conditions as far as lighting goes. Often one is enough since you don't have to overcome nearly as many shadows as you do when the surface of the ground is dark. I'm sure it's not the same everywhere, but for riding on the shore, we've usually been amazed by how much the reflectivity of snow makes a greater range of lighting setups not only useable but effective.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 21, 2021, 8:46 p.m.

I love snow rides… it’s like daylight on the lowest setting.

Reply

martin
+1 Greg Bly
Martin  - Oct. 17, 2021, 5:24 p.m.

I'm still using my trusty bought-used Lezyne MegaDrive/SuperDrive lights with replaceable batteries. 

The SuperDrives use 18650s so I bought a few new ones last winter and I'm golden. The only thing is that they're only 600-700lumens, but for snow riding on not too technical trails they've been great on my helmet.

The 1100 lumen MegaDrive came with 2 batteries (double 18650s) so I can also swap one mid-ride.

The original batteries are from 2013-2014 and still give me around 80% of the advertised time. Keeping in mind that I'm always using them between 0c and -10/-15C. Below that it drops quite a bit faster.

Anyway, what I really wanted to say is that the Dayblazer would be a great replacement, even if I'd prefer replaceable batteries again. 

The Fenix BC30 (2200lumens burst, 1500 high for 2.3hrs) is probably the one I'd buy for this reason. It's 130$cdn/90$usd, uses rechargeable 18650 batteries and has a remote to put close to your shifters.

Reply

Bad-Sean
+1 Martin
Sean Chee  - Oct. 18, 2021, 6:31 a.m.

I’ve gone off Fenix over the last couple of years. I’ve had three headlamps fail in normal use and been denied warranty claims on all of them. Until then, I had quite liked their products. Nitecore support has been a much better experience. They recently sent me a replacement switch for a torch that is well out of warranty. I also discovered genuine nitecore lights available for huge discounts on AliExpress.

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martin
0
Martin  - Oct. 18, 2021, 8:17 a.m.

Thanks for the feedback, I might pass on the Fenix. Were your warranty issues for a bike light or one of their flashlights? 

The Nitecore HU60 could be another option then, I'm using their 18650 batteries in my Lezynes and their products seem to have good reviews.

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DadStillRides
+1 Andrew Major
DadStillRides  - Oct. 21, 2021, 4:57 a.m.

I'm currently running the Bontrager ion pro rt on helmet and Niterider lumina 1100 on bar. It's a pretty great setup, but always interested in more light and a smoother helmet setup.

I've never used a gobro and kinda lost in all the options for an action cam helmet mount to pair with this Blackburn (or Outbound). Any recommendations?

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Oct. 21, 2021, 8:45 p.m.

I’ve never owned a GoPro. Just bought their standard stick-on helmet mount at the local camera shop.

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