My Pedals Are Better Than Your Pedals

Words Cam McRae
Date Jul 29, 2015

Originally published (at first with a different and unfortunately chosen, name) October 22nd, 2014

I keep trying to convince myself it didn’t push me over the edge. By the time someone called my flat pedals ‘faggotty-ass’ I was already considering a return to clipless. (Note – to be clear – I do not use this kind of language, nor do I approve of using sexual orientation as a slur). In fact, because of my stubborn Scottish temperament, the comment may have slowed my move back to clipping in. I wanted to continue standing up (on sticky rubber) to the elitism that can be rampant in cycling – and that I have often been guilty of. We riders frequently believe there is one right way to do almost everything to do with mountain biking. Choose a wheel size, or a pedal, and be a dick about it.

gee_svenmartin

Two riders became heroes for flat pedal riders during this year’s World Cup, but the first one was unexpected. Gee Atherton, who always seems to be clipped in, defeated the mud and all comers in Cairns in 2014 – wearing borrowed shoes and pedals. Photo – Sven Martin/Red Bull Content Pool

Time has mellowed me but in the past my Scottishness made me stingy, close-minded and cynical about the-next-big-thing. I resisted ditching my toe clips from the 80s and then pushed back against SPDs when they first appeared. I lengthened my pig-headed streak when, as freeriding was negotiating its awkward infancy, flat pedals began their heyday. After that I dug in, sticking primarily to flats off road for the next 16 years, long after most riders I know.

The quest to figure out a better way to securely attach shoes to pedals, while letting you escape when things go haywire, is as old as the bicycle itself. The first clipless model was patented in April of 1895, just a year after ball bearings first appeared in pedals. Like SPDs they released with a twist – but it took a twist to get in as well. 1895 had more to offer though and in April a suction cup pedal was invented along with a second clipless pedal in August, this time with a recessed cleat. (according to the Speedplay pedal timeline, in 1895 there were two US patent offices, “one for bicycles products and one for everything else”). Magnets weren’t tried until 1897 but it wasn’t over; Mavic made a magnetic pedal in 2009. And the quest hasn’t stopped since. The fact that many of us are torn between flats and clicking in suggests the pedal will continue to evolve.

timeline

This exists. You’ll find a fairly comprehensive timeline of the bicycle pedal on Speedplay’s web site – to go along with their pedal museum.

In 1991 Alex, Mike and I filed into Robson Cycles on Fir St. in Vancouver to buy matching sets of Shimano 737 pedals and top of line shoes. Keith Whittaker, one of the shop owners and my boss for a short time, told us he’d give us a discount for our triple purchase. He was lamenting his math by the time we arrived, and he probably still is today, but he kept his word and we were off. I have a vague and highly unreliable memory that we paid $164 apiece.

We took our bounty to Alex’s place on Coleman street, near the gate on Mt. Fromme, and there we installed cleats and pedals before cruising boisterously up the fire road. We knew crashing without releasing was inevitable on our first ride, so Pipeline wasn’t the best trail choice, but we were young and rendered stupid by testosterone. There were a few hard bails – I tumbled clumsily off a bridge and into a creek without releasing – but by the end of the ride turning our heels out was becoming instinctive.

My career as an awkward, skinny-riding, drop to flat specialist began after I had picked up those bulk-purchase 737s. Clipping out became natural and, while my frequent falls were often worse than they might have been, I liked the security of being attached to the bike.

737

In a world of planned obsolescence, Shimano’s SPD pedals are an outlier. A cleat from 1990 will work on a pedal from 2014 and vice versa, And they work exceptionally well. Including touring across Europe, racing XC and years of commuting I put some serious abuse on a set just like these over the course of 15 years – and they were flawless. This past summer I put a set on my Dekerf for an old School Hardtail ride – and I couldn’t feel the difference between them and my brand new XT Trail pedals.

My buddy Trevor Hansen was the first to try and talk me into flats. I didn’t see the appeal at all but one day at the Woodlot, a riding area not far from Vancouver, I gave them a go. At that time the Woodlot had some of the most imaginative and challenging trails around and our favourite, the Crazy Carpenter, began with a series of 6-footers to flat, spiral ladder bridges and lots of skinnies. A teeter totter on top of a fallen log that was 6 feet in diameter was one of the less intimidating moves. Half way down I was hooked. Being able to toss a foot as an outrigger was a revelation, as was sliding my foot up the pedal to prevent drop-to-flat ankle injuries. Trevor was right and I was an immediate convert.

A shot of the clipless pedal version. Only the red sole distinguishes the cleated version from the flat.  Flat versions all have a black sole.

Since my conversion Specialized’s new 2FO shoe has been choice for clipping in. I no longer have the patience for XC slippers and these are comfortable off the bike as well. A relatively new feature in these shoes and the Five Ten Impact VXi clipless is the long cleat channels that allow you to move your foot forward on the pedal for a better descending position. I don’t mind it for climbing either, but my cleats aren’t back as far as they can go. Photo – Ryan Cleek

In those days, before Five Ten saved the day, pedal grip was terrible. When I found a shoe that did a decent job I bought two pairs. Crappy bearings, heavy, overbuilt cages and easily sheared pins (that were difficult to replace) were features most flat pedals shared circa. 2000.

Pedals improved slowly but Five Tens blew the lid off over night. Grip stopped being an issue the moment Stealth rubber made contact with even mediocre platforms. Pedalling improved, descending hit the next level and I started unrepentantly using flats for everything from Chilcotin epics to the Whistler Bike Park.

samhill_parisgore

Lately flat pedals have become as rare as skin suits on the World Cup Circuit, but Sam Hill has kept the faith and returned to the podium after a significant drought. This photo is from his winning run in Méribel in 2014. Photo – Paris Gore/Red Bull Content Pool

For a time I switched back to clipless on rare occasions when it seemed to make sense – but it was always a disappointment. I’d arrive at a media camp where the trails were sinewy and smooth and slap on some SPDs for the first day. I’d have a shit time, ride poorly and put them back in my suitcase for the rest of the trip. I simply had less fun clipped in so I forsook SPDs completely.

My reluctance to switch back had a lot to do with the downsides of clicking in. Clipless pedals are horrendous when you jump on your bike wearing flip flops – or anything but the right shoes – and hiking on slick rock or slime-covered logs is treacherous in clipless footwear. Even the best new shoes for clipping in are crap for hiking because of the slippery metal cleat that is rarely recessed more than a millimetre – and often not at all. Crashing is more likely it seems to me, or more accurately easier to avoid on flats, but that is open to debate. It’s less controversial to contend that crashes are usually more punishing when you’re clipped in.

I remember watching Stevie Smith on a great run in 2011 or 2012 (it might have been Leogang Worlds?) before he started clicking in. He nosed into something heavily but he rode the front wheel and managed to wrestle the rear wheel back to the ground. In my memory he shot his feet out to the sides to counter balance but that probably didn’t happen. Everyone watching gasped but he held on and, because he’d lost almost no time, he ended up on the podium. I remember thinking he would surely have eaten shit if he’d been attached but we’ll never know.

me_naramata

I’ve wished for my flats on a few sections of several trails, but only one trail had me pining from top to bottom. The trail shown, above Naramata B.C., was just fine with spuds. Photo – Pete Roggeman

I had lots of reasons to keep the flat pedal faith but my health tipped me over the edge. A back injury that was slow to heal had slowed me down last spring and I was feeling like I’d take any help I could get. I felt restricted and uncomfortable at first, as expected, but after several months I’m mostly over the hump. The knowledge that I’m not going to slip a pedal at speed through a rock garden allows me to stay loose on the bike – which is faster and more fun. More surprising is the revelation that I’m more comfortable in the air. I feel like I’ve got more options for controlling the bike which gives me more confidence when I’m, very briefly, off the ground. My technical climbing has improved unsurprisingly and now that things have fallen into place I’ve been feeling really good on the bike in most situations.

Even a few months in, clipping in isn’t as seamless as it was at the end of my first tour of duty – but I know it’ll keep getting better. And aside from any time I’ve had to walk on hard surfaces, I’ve only yearned for my flats once, while riding TKO, one of the steepest trails in the B.C. interior (more on that soon). The soil was silty and forgiving allowing us to ride pitches that would be impossible in other areas, and I missed that planted feel of flats and the easy on and off security that tempers my terror. There were also a few log rides and elevated moves that I was too nervous to try while firmly attached to the bike. While it seems like I’m in for the haul on Shimano XT Trail pedals, a direct descendent of my 737s, my long tenure on flats will allow me to swap back and forth when I get the itch.

Did I buckle in the end, forsaking my individuality to be accepted by the cool kids? I’m reluctant to admit it was likely a factor, but this old interface that feels new has added more juice to every ride, so how I got here is hardly relevant. Everything I learned riding flats is of use now that I’m clipped in and I don’t regret my platform time at all.

Whatever pushed me over the edge, the stubborn Scot in me is grateful for the intervention.


Any thoughts on pedals?

Comments

terry
0
Terry  - July 30, 2015, 1:22 a.m.

What has happened to the quality of 5_10 products lately, since Adidas took over their shoes more or less fall apart within a month. The amount og stealth rubber added to the sole is minimal, and the sole just delaminates from the shoes. My pins chew through the sole in 30 days. The old impacts lasted forever, the new flimsy ones are a joke. I started out riding spd's and changed after 5 years to flats, having a hard time seeing myself going back.

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Hellhammer
-2 IslandLife Velocipedestrian
Jeff Craig  - Dec. 9, 2014, 4:32 p.m.

I haven't rode flat pedals since I stopped riding my Banana Bike; on the streets, on the Shore or racing. I believe your feet belong on the pedals, unless your doing a can-can, in which case you must certainly be a homo…

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Ryan-Leech
0
RyanLeech  - Oct. 30, 2014, 3:36 p.m.

Thanks for the sharing your pedal journey Cam, I love this topic. Cam, what was your experience with technical skill development during your time on flats vs clips? For me, I learned how to ride trials with clips, then I swapped to flats and immediately sucked, but since my hero's (Hans & Libor, Ot, etc) rode flats, I stuck it out and soon sky rocketed past my previous clipless skill level. I had to re-learn skills, but with flats I was forced to learn by using my whole body as a unit instead of shortcutting to yanks of the clips. I ride a lot of trail these days, and still haven't come up with any reason to switch to clips, my feet never bounce off on rough sections, and if they ever did I know I was going too fast for my own good! If you're racing, dh or xc, that's another story, every second counts, not recreationally though…even last year when I did bcbr I rode flats, I discovered that on a few rare and rough pieces of undulating fast single track sections clips would have allowed me to keep mashing the pedals and applying power, but I was still keeping up quite happily to satisfy my recreational competitiveness. Wow, I can blab on about flats!….One other opinion I have is that new riders best be encouraged to start with flat pedals until they learn the basics, at which time they can experiment with clips. Cheers!

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 31, 2014, 10:46 a.m.

Thanks Ryan. I don't think I suffered much when I switched to flats because I didn't have many skills to lose! Back in those days I would practice taking a few hops on my back wheel and doing level hops - and those skills suffered initially but I wasn't good enough to use them on the trail. At the same time I'm sure that my progression as a rider was boosted by my time on flats. Before that I couldn't properly bunny hop and the way I used my body was limited because I kept my feet in line at all times. Now, even clipped in, I angle my feet and push against the mechanism in the pedals to add body english. My inputs are different and being clipped in boosts some of those skills - like bunny hops and placing the rear wheel. I agree that the best way to learn to ride is with flats. Otherwise there are skills you are unlikely to pick up. It's likely that after I get to the point where I'm comfortable again clipping in and out and riding the odd elevated challenge clipped in I'll revert to switching back and forth - using fun factor to decide the best pedals for a given ride. Thanks for chiming in!

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vernon-felton
+1 Cam McRae
Vernon Felton  - Oct. 27, 2014, 1:05 p.m.

Strong article, Cam. I was stoked to see an even-handed assessment of the ever-bitter flats vs. SPD debate… Though, to be honest, I think riders who trip on (and get aggro about) other peoples' equipment choices are kind of missing the beauty of riding in the first place. Finally, I also understand why people blew a gasket about the headline, but you guys handled the title change like pros, admitted the original title should have been better, and were cool with people who felt the need to speak up about it. Kind of reminds me of the site in general-well-written and responsive. Kudos.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 31, 2014, 10:49 a.m.

Wow. Thanks Vernon!

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bigwave-dave
0
BigWave Dave  - Oct. 23, 2014, 10:04 p.m.

Based on the context of most of the posts here I hesitate to say this, but with pedals, I go both ways. Although they're hard to find, there are a few good dual sided pedals (Wellgo Wam D-10s for ex) that have good flats with pins on one side and shimano style clipless on the other. When free- riding/jumping I ride the flats, as soon as it goes flat, uneventful, or uphill, I clip in. My downhill bike is typically a flats only affair, but with 90% of my cross-country, park, freeriding, and even downhill riding done on my all-purpose rig - it's an easy solution to those who are torn. If you can kick a pedal over then there's no need to have to commit to one or the other. Is this popular? Who give a crap!

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PeterO
0
PeterO  - Oct. 22, 2014, 11:03 p.m.

Growing up XC racing I always used clips but I had a brief riding break during college and when I returned back to riding I decided to try flats. I stuck with them for a couple of years and learnt a lot from flats. I always had it in my mind that I would go back to clips but before my re-attaching Five Tens appeared on the scene and after trying a pair I was blown away by the level of confidence they provided.

I've now been using flats exclusively for over 10years and unless I return to race at a serious level I can honestly say I'll never return to clips. The skills you learn on flats are incredible and once you dial in the correct inputs you don't need the 'performance' enhancement provided by clips. All new MTB riders should rock flats for at least a few years to build the right techniques before ever even trying clips, there's no advantage to clips to the new rider but there are many disadvantages.

I'm a strong believer that if you are racing and you are at the pointy end of the group then ride clips because they could be the difference between winning and losing, unless you're Sam Hill of course!!

Clips for racing, flats for recreating…

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klankilla
-1 IslandLife
RV  - Oct. 22, 2014, 12:21 p.m.

I'm curious if the NSMB viewership is going up or down over the recent years. Some of the articles are too hipster/snobby/opinionated for me. The site has a 'boys club' kinda feel to it. Not super inviting and kind of preachy.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 3:04 p.m.

Our numbers have been increasing steadily for the last 18 months RV. I'm sorry you haven't appreciated our approach of late. We have made telling the truth and being authentic high priorities. Too many publications are run only to generate profit - and the commercialization of the media is something we can't abide by. We have lost advertisers because of this approach but we have gained even more to replace them. This way we end up working with companies we respect rather than those who think they can, for example, buy a positive review. What is it you'd like to see more of? What would you like to see less? Frankly we've had more positive feedback from all corners than ever before in recent months. I hope this isn't the case but maybe we just aren't your cup of tea? Thanks for taking the time to give us some feedback. We always appreciate it when it is framed constructively like yours.

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troy
0
Troy  - Oct. 22, 2014, 11:35 a.m.

I rode clips for years on my hardtail and then when I went full-sus and started leaving the ground I went to flats/5-10s. I tried to switch back, but I can't. I move my foot/ankle/leg around too much and the clipless were too constricting. On dirt it's all flats all the time.

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andrew-gower
0
Andrew Gower  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:58 a.m.

I still ride both Flats and Spuds. I ride Spuds on my 29er Trail Bike - a Banshee Prime. I really like the whole "connected to the bike" feel. However, the super sketchy "OMG - I'm going to die!" feeling I get on skinnies (we still have some here on the Island) isn't my favorite. I have flats on my Park / DH Bike - a Banshee Scythe. I like knowing that, at speed, I can get my feet clear instantly. The combo of Straitline pedals and 510 shoes makes them almost as grippy as the Spuds. I'll keep both thanks. Good read - my pedal choice has followed a similar evolution.

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mrbungle
0
Mr.Bungle  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:37 a.m.

the guy quotes something that was said to him. this PC world is too much, so many people offended by words. really?
how many here laugh at Family Guy? pick and choose your outrage. now go ride your bike!

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mark-geard
0
Mark Geard  - July 30, 2015, 2:16 a.m.

I completely agree with this ! It was a comment directed at him, and is explained as such !! . It is a great article, and almost all comments are directed at a phrase ! stop taking yourselves so seriously, and go shred some trails !!!!

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 IslandLife
Cam McRae  - July 30, 2015, 11:22 a.m.

To be fair Mark, I originally used the phrase as the title of the article. As a result many people saw it on social media and weren't able to establish a context. I failed to take that into consideration. Clearly we see it similarly though and I appreciate the kind words!

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0
uncle duke  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:35 a.m.

fuk i missed the controversy….:(

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0
mightyted  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:56 a.m.

Bear in mind the intent. Someone made a derogatory comments about his Flats. I think Cam is merely trying to draw attention to, and introspection on peoples attitudes in our sport. I would be pretty horrified if someone used that kind of language, but especially regarding something so trivial as my choice in pedals.
Bike-snobbery should always be tempered with respect.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:39 a.m.

Offensive title removed. To be clear, I find this kind of language offensive as well - and I used it to illustrate one of the attitudes that persists in our sport - and perhaps all sports. I would never use a word referring to sexual orientation as a slur - and to be clear this was directed at me rather than by me. Regardless I clearly caused offense and, while that was not my intention, I apologize sincerely.

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Jerry-Rig
0
Jerry Willows  - Oct. 23, 2014, 8:52 a.m.

I can assure everyone that Cam would not use any kind of language to offend anyone. I've seen him argue people who. Shame it was taken out of context.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 31, 2014, 10:50 a.m.

Thanks JDub!

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johnny-smoke
0
Johnny Smoke  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:37 a.m.

Ride clipped if you want to get fast. Ride flats if you want to get good.

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squagles
0
squagles  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:19 a.m.

That article was really queer and I bet the writer putts from the rough and listens to that house music

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jeff-buydos
0
Jeff Buydos  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:14 a.m.

All of you people offended by the title don't seem to understand it. Cam is demeaning the person who said that for being a complete moron…much like he should do to anyone who doesn't get that.

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ericschiller
0
ericschiller  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:27 a.m.

If that's the case, the title isn't the place to do that.

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Henry-Chinaski
0
Henry Chinaski  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:35 a.m.

So it would have been equally appropriate to use a racial slur uttered by the said individual?

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Henry-Chinaski
0
Henry Chinaski  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:01 a.m.

Cringing. Don't let the stubborn Scott get in the way of changing the title. Pronto!

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andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:01 a.m.

Interesting take on the flat/ SPD switch over. Going throught the same process as I know from being an ex-XC racer that SPDs are more secure overall but my 13 years of flat pedals and Five Tens brain just cannot make the jump. I will keep persevering just not in the autumn when everything is wet and slippery.

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jonathan-harris
0
Jonathan Harris  - Oct. 22, 2014, 10:02 a.m.

This tends to be my pattern too, flats all winter while it is wet and slick and I'm not really focused on getting up the hill as fast as possible. Clips are needed on the hard tail though, just to keep my feet on the pedals through the rough stuff.

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andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Oct. 22, 2014, 10:53 a.m.

@JH Don't know why I am finding it such a mental hurdle, I spend more time thinking about "I might need to unclip" or "how bad the crash might be" rather than enjoying the ride. The irony is that when I am on flats I never think about putting my foot down and very rarely need to do so. I also had my left knee reconstructed and clipping out over a full day of riding (3+ hours) just aggravates it. The human brain is an odd place!

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jonathan-harris
0
Jonathan Harris  - Oct. 22, 2014, 6:10 p.m.

Agreed it is. My return to flats in the winter is more about me liking to ride loose and know that I will likely slide and need to dab!

Reply

malcolminthemiddle
-1 IslandLife
Malcolminthemiddle  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:01 a.m.

Cam your piece of work, it's been a becoming habit with your rud uncensored b.s. Please for the sake of the website and the NSMB community step down. This along with your endless attack on community members replys that go angaist posted articles is enough to look elsewhere for a website that represents the"whole cycling community" This takes the cake and really theirs no defence on this one. Your a sick man that needs a reality check. Go away!

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 IslandLife
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:41 a.m.

Thanks for the feedback Malcolm.

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drewm
+1 IslandLife
DrewM  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:51 a.m.

Cam, obviously, screwed up. Title changed, explanation provided, genuine contrition at the error, and I'm certain reflection on his choice.

We know Cam screwed up, because he posted the article under his own name and owned it for good/bad (as he always does, whether we agree with what he is saying or not).

If you are going to call someone out for all their character flaws, you perceive, so flippantly the very least you can do is attach your name to your post. Your personal attack is invalidated by your anonymity.

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malcolmshouldleave
+1 IslandLife
Malcolmshouldleave  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:04 a.m.

Tell you what Malcolm, you go and start your own website and forum community and live your little PC life there. This is Cam's site and he can run it how he likes. Step down? Are you for real? Go away.

Reply

counterpoint
-1 IslandLife
jeremy  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:07 a.m.

anyone who writes like this, deserves to be attacked by rude, uncensored B.S.

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andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Oct. 22, 2014, 10:57 a.m.

Based on your spelling I am guessing that your reading skills are somewhat lacking as well. Cam was relaying a comment someone else had directed towards him and using this unacceptable expression as an indicator of how narrow minded any part of our community can be. In the same way that I subconsciously make assumptions about people in response to their poor spelling.

Perhaps using that expression as the title was a poor choice and he has apologised for any misunderstanding that it may have helped people to make and subsequently corrected it.

It is a forum not a dictatorship, if you don't like the content unsubscribe and spend your internet time somewhere else. No not a mod, just think your response was poorly considered and a little over the top.

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mentalmidgetmalcolm
0
mentalmidgetmalcolm  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:07 p.m.

You are barely able to string together a coherent sentence and you think you have some idea of who should run a blog? You sound like a disgruntled child. Go back to your hole and stop wasting our oxygen. Idiot.

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mike-x
0
Mike X  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:56 a.m.

Cam, I know that you were using the word "faggoty" in the context of someone else using it, but this is still perpetuating discrimination against gays and the LGBT community in general by using it all. It's 2014 and I'm quite surprised that you haven't joined the rest of us yet by dropping the homophobic terminology.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:50 a.m.

I have long been a defender of gay rights and I never use words referring to gay people in a derogatory way. As I mentioned above, this was directed at me - not by me. I was talking about what happened rather than condoning it. In fact the opposite was the case. Would it change things if you learned that I am gay? You don't know one way or the other I imagine but while I am straight, I would never be offended by anyone suggesting I am not. I believe in marriage equality and that sexual orientation is not a choice. While I realize I have offended people because of the title of my piece, I was actually reporting on something that happened - and I certainly don't think it's okay to talk that way.
All I can do at this point is reiterate that I'm sorry for any offense I have caused. I usually do something stupid every day so it's nice to have it out of way for today.

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spencer-santenello
0
Spencer Santenello  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:28 a.m.

The article was an OK morning read. The title is pretty unacceptable. Cam, I'm sure you meant no disrespect but please refrain from using homophobic or other degrading terms in your titles unless its essential to the subject matter or to make a point.

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agleck7
0
Agleck7  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:34 a.m.

Agreed. I read the site at work and was worried that a co-worker might see the title on my screen. Definitely not acceptable in my office (rightly so).

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agleck7
0
Agleck7  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:34 a.m.

That said. I liked the article and really enjoy the personal perspectives/opinion content on the site.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:57 a.m.

Thanks for saying so Agleck.

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spencer-santenello
0
Spencer Santenello  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:13 p.m.

Thank You Cam for handling this issue proper! I did like the historical Clipless and flats discussion and your personal perspective!

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0
Tom  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:23 a.m.

I'm more offended by that Enduro-goggle set up

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cj
0
CJ  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:22 a.m.

Two things for your to-do list today:
1) Change title
2) Spend some time being embarrassed that you posted the title in the first place. (I'm embarrassed for you, but you should contribute as well)

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Oct. 22, 2014, 8:54 a.m.

Done and done CJ! Thanks.

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cj
0
CJ  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:07 a.m.

Awesome! Kudos for responding quickly and thoroughly!

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icespicol
0
Icespicol  - Oct. 23, 2014, 4:02 p.m.

Damn. I missed the original title. What was it? Hopefully it's "okay" to read it in a comment thread. Thanks.

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ryan-d
0
Ryan D  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:13 a.m.

Fine article but I wish you guys wouldn't use derogatory titles, it's offensive to me and others I know in the MTB community and it makes it difficult to enjoy your website.

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coexist
0
COEXIST  - Oct. 22, 2014, 7:49 a.m.

I for one am completely fine with my pedals being of whatever orientation they desire and am a little offended that the commenters are not ok with having homosexual bike components. Let's try to be a little more open minded.

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ryan-d
0
Ryan D  - Oct. 22, 2014, 9:44 a.m.

Thanks NSMB for making the change! Much appreciated. Great review on the Guide brakes too.

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pete@nsmb.com
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Pete Roggeman  - Oct. 22, 2014, 10:27 a.m.

We appreciate the feedback, Ryan - from you and everyone else. It's important to us to inspire engagement and discussion, but not at the expense of others. Which wasn't the intent, of course, but we always have more to learn.

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mammal
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Mammal  - Oct. 22, 2014, 10:52 a.m.

Ya that didn't take long. My first impression of that title was "wow, how did that get past the joke stage?"

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