playadust.original copy2
Beggars Would Ride

My Enemy The Sun

Words Mike Ferrentino
Date Sep 8, 2022
Reading time

The first time The Sun came to hurt me, I was five years old. We had just moved down to New Zealand, and nobody really had much knowledge about the giant hole in the ozone layer that was perched invisibly up in the sky above the land of the long white cloud, slowly burning the pale skinned descendants of British colonists into a ruddy precancer. My parents sure didn’t know about it, so off I went to play at the beach, coming home every day bright pink and with sand in my shorts. After a few outings like this, the melanin had been burned completely from my nose, and I was destined to wear the stigmata of white zinc oxide cream on my face for the remainder of my childhood.

The Sun had marked me, and has stalked me ever since. I am at the canary-in-the-coal-mine end of the sun-resistant spectrum. Fair-skinned enough that these days, if I stand outside on a bright summer day, my bald head can handle about five minutes of exposure before it turns pink. 10 minutes is guaranteed to cause pain. If I’m careful with building up exposure, I can get to the point where my arms and legs don’t get too badly burned, but my face and head are about as sun-comfortable as a newborn albino baby’s ass.

Those early years of zinc oxide creams gave way to a lifelong regimen of sunscreens; always trying to find one that didn’t leave me feeling like I had been dipped in a plastic bag. Choice of sunscreen has shifted in time with whatever cultural zeitgeist has dictated is best at warding off The Sun’s ultraviolet reach; zinc oxide to chemical based and now back to mineral based again all these decades later.

zincboy

"Come on, Mikey, this will help stop your face burning off."

"No, mom! You totally don't get it. It'll just give the sand something to stick to when the cool kids rub my face on the beach..."

My batting average with sunscreen application and appropriate shadewear was pretty abysmal all the way into and through my twenties. Maybe it was vanity, maybe it was stubbornness, or maybe it was just stupidity, but I got sunburned. A lot. I had recurring dreams during my teenage years that an oral sunblock had been developed, where you could take a pill and become completely impervious to sunburn or skin cancer, but with the small side effect of having your skin turn iridescent green. I strode naked through my dreams, proudly shimmering like a hummingbird, while The Sun’s damning rays reflected harmlessly from my beautiful armored body.

I would look awesome in a shimmering iridescent shade of green, by the way.

Mountain bikes entered the picture as I hit my 20s, and in addition to the application challenges of sunscreen, I now got to learn all about heat exhaustion from the perspective of a not very fast bike racer. Every summer etched into me a set of visceral memories; the rim of superheated pink sunburned skin where the elastic hems of Lycra shorts and jerseys ended, the road maps of sweat streaking the dirt caked upon shaved legs, the smell of dust and pine needles mixed with a scent that can only be described as “I am burning," the hot spots on my scalp where The Sun had cooked track marks into my head through my helmet vents, those Very Memorable few times where I overheated myself so completely that I became raving and nonsensical, feverishly weakened, my body thermometer broken for days afterwards.

capeepichell

Somewhere, at the tail end of this dust cloud, someone felt his will to live evaporate with the last of his body's sweat.... Photo courtesy Cape Epic / Greg Beadle

There are racers who live for the heat, who say that their muscles really only start to loosen up and work properly once the mercury gets above 80 degrees Fahrenheit. I was not one of them. On those hot days, fidgeting on the start line, already sweating, I felt existential dread. It was exactly the same prickly-skinned, almost claustrophobic nervousness that I used to experience whenever someone proposed “a day at the beach.” Summer bike racing made me feel very small and fragile at times. The itch to race eventually subsided, but I continued to get caught out in The Sun, and I continued to pay the price.

For the most part, I adapted as best I could to my inability to absorb sunlight or process heat. Don’t push the pace. Get the riding done early, or late. Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the noonday sun (they say). Suck up that pride and cover thine skin. Long sleeves, gloves, do-rags, always carry a hat just in case you get stuck somewhere outside without shade. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate… But still, every summer, like clockwork, around this time of year, I hit a personal wall. Mountain biking, this thing that I love to do, this sport that has had its teeth in me for so long now, this act that is so ingrained in my life that I have recurring dreams about floating endless wheelies, begins to feel like the LAST thing I want to do.

thirsttrap

This is the time of year when mountain biking seems like not such a great idea. Swimming pools with giant floaties, however, seem like a FANTASTIC idea nowabouts...

That I choose to live in the drought-prone, summer-scorched, fire-blasted and eternally dusty American West – one of the most inhospitable places on earth for ginger-haired, fair-skinned, part-albino mountain bikers – is an irony that I cannot rationally explain. It is also a choice that most people view with either scorn or derision: Scorn, as in, “move somewhere cooler, dipshit.” Derision, as in, “you think you’ve got it bad, try living in England. You’ll be begging for sunburn after a Yorkshire winter.”

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence (they say). Maybe so. In my case, the greener grass “over there” would imply clouds and summer rain, loamy soil, temps that rarely get into the triple digits,* if ever. From the other side of the fence, the grass over here would only be green for about a month each year, mid-March to mid-April, and would otherwise be bleached grey and dead by September, full of foxtails and stickleburrs, hiding rattlesnakes and covering beige dirt baked so hard that it may as well be concrete scattered with kitty litter. There is some small solace to be had knowing I am not the only one who has an adversarial relationship with The Sun, but at the same time, the news reports that so often crop up every summer about cyclists dying in the heat is always heartbreaking and all too close.

*38º celsius

My phone lit up with text alerts the other day, on the second day of a heatwave that kicked in last Friday and isn’t likely to break until tomorrow. One of the text alerts was from PG&E, warning of the likelihood of rolling blackouts as the power grid attempted to shoulder the burden of millions of air conditioners cranking at full cold. Another was from the local firewatch, informing residents that current air humidity levels were dipping below 15% and that these are really good conditions for shit to catch fire, with the implication that this is not a really good time to flick cigarette butts out into the woods. And a third was from a swarthy friend inviting me to go for a ride near the coast, where it was “way cooler, probably only gonna hit around 90 degrees* today…”

*32 Celsius

houseofbigair

When the mercury tries to bust out of the thermometer, swimming beats riding any day. Now, if we can combine riding WITH swimming, we may be onto something here...

Sigh. No. Thank you, but no. Instead, I spent the weekend indoors, sweating over some long overdue tire swaps and brake bleeds. Sunday night I dreamed of being iridescent again, for the first time in a few decades. I also dreamed of riding on a carpet of loamy soil, gently brushing through ferns as I rode beneath a canopy of towering conifers. The ferns were wet with dew, soaking my arms and legs as I brushed through them, cooling my bare, sunscreen free limbs as I pedaled.

Not today, Sun. You don’t get to kill me today.

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

lacykemp
Lacy Kemp
3 months ago
+6 Pete Roggeman Andy Eunson Andrew Major Mike Ferrentino Tjaard Breeuwer Dave Smith

I'm Florida grown (go ahead, make fun of me). But unlike the oranges, I got the shit end of the stick. Melanoma has haunted me for the past five years. My body looks like a cross between Casper the Ghost and Freddy Krueger as I try to navigate totally avoiding any sun exposure and the reality of the chunks of my flesh that have been taken from my face, chest, back, and legs. I'm lucky to live in a place that rarely sees 80 degrees so I can still rock the sun shirts and not totally die on each ride... but I've also discovered what I think is the Holy Grail of sunscreen*. It's let me get back to my tank top-loving ways. Give it a try and let those pits breathe.

*26C

**not sponsored by said company, but sure wouldn't mind it

Reply

shrockie
Shrockie
2 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Thanks for the recco, Lacy! Will check it out for my sun loving, Irish skinned, partner in crime

Reply

xy9ine
Perry Schebel
3 months ago
+5 Pete Roggeman Mike Ferrentino finbarr Dave Smith Andrew Major

so with you. my pasty slavic/nordic flesh wasn't designed for sun, so i'm more than happy to live in our dank, forest shrouded corner of the world. the sun can piss off.

Reply

DaveSmith
Dave Smith
3 months ago
+4 Mike Ferrentino Perry Schebel Kos Andrew Major

I told Cooper a few days ago that during the summer months is when I most feel Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D). 

Thankfully the march to dark and rainy season has finally begun.

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
3 months ago
+4 Timer Mike Ferrentino Pete Roggeman Lynx .

I took a visitor riding on our local forest trails a few years ago. He was slathering on the sunscreen and selecting his sunglasses. I chuckled and let him know we wasn't going to see the sun for the next 2-3hrs as the tree canopy was to thick.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
+2 Pete Roggeman shenzhe

You lucky, lucky person, wish we had some o f that down here. This is actually something I struggle with constantly down here with visitors who come and want to ride, have to try to explain to them, that unlike where most are from, we don't have tree cover on most of our trails and the sun is a bastard and makes 32C here feel a LOT different than riding in 32C under tree cover. 

Once had a couple from Georgia say they wanted to start riding at 11am because Georgia gets as hot as here, all I could do is laugh and tell them that at that time of year, the absolute latest we roll is 7am and that's late - while we were climbing the final climb  back at 10am, the wife looked at me and exclaimed how glad she was that I'd not paid them any mind and we'd started early.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
3 months ago
+4 Niels van Kampenhout Mike Ferrentino Andy Eunson Lynx .

Mike, now is the time to get up here. Clear weather, but cool mornings - dare I say cold? - this morning it was 9ºC at 7am. Dew on all the branches I scrape by on my way up the narrow climbers around here. Still a bit dusty, we need a single rainfall for conditions to be 10/10.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
+1 Pete Roggeman

Man how I wish I could get up there right now, expect that you'll be getting some showers soon and the colours will be changing, will be absolutely beautiful. When we hit Crested Butte back in 2016, we were there as the colours started to change, but unfortunately missed out on the full showing.

Reply

mammal
Mammal
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

We got significant rain on Sunday, conveniently, right before the long weekend Monday. Even more convenient, I happened to have taken the whole next week off. September is MY JAM, it feels amazing to exist in this little bubble of pre-fall perfection.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
3 months ago
0

We got a little less than I'd hoped for over here on the SSC, but it still made a difference on Monday. Roots were grrrrreassssyyy but the dirt was sweet.

Reply

DBone57
DBone57
3 months ago
+3 Andy Eunson Mike Ferrentino Tjaard Breeuwer

I'm 54 and have had 6 MOHS surgeries on my face, and 2 standard skin cancer surgeries on my shoulders. I live and ride in the SoCal high desert and I wear a long sleeve 'sun proof' shirt 365 days a year, as well as a Halo headband skull cap (Amazon) under my helmet. I also use 100SPF on my face, lips, ears and neck 365 too.

During the summer I leave my house no later than 6:45AM and sometimes that's pushing it. Everyone that doesn't know me always asks why I wear a long sleeve and "aren't I hot", I just smile and say nope.

If only I would've been this smart when I was a kid and young man working outside as an electrician, and I'm sure I have more procedures ahead of me.... but hey, chicks dig scars, right?

Reply

kos
Kos
3 months ago
+2 Mike Ferrentino Pete Roggeman

So good. As I age, I've started referring to the sun as "the beast", and my wife says I've become part vampire. I'd sooner walk back to the trail head than fix a flat in the sun........cheers!

Reply

Timer
Timer
3 months ago
+2 Mike Ferrentino Pete Roggeman

Funnily, compared to most other sports I did, mountainbiking was always the one where I had to worry the least about sunburn.

Between helmets with visors, full finger gloves, knee pads, longish shorts, packs for carrying sunscreen and dust clouds, sunburn seems relatively rare.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
+3 Pete Roggeman Andy Eunson Timer

But then, down here at least, layering all that stuff onto the body along with the slathering of sunscreen covering the few remaining exposed areas of skin is a recipe to get baked alive. Marinaded in your own juices, sorta like a sous vide. A decade or so ago I was racing the Breck Epic, and was wearing baggies over my Lycra to prove that I was no longer taking this racing thing seriously. About a mile into the first long climb of the day I began to overheat. Pulled over, stripped the baggies off, breathed a sigh of relief. it felt about ten degrees cooler without them on. Horses for courses, I guess. But it takes almost nothing to push me over the edge into overheating these days...

Reply

kos
Kos
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Did this exact thing on Bull Run, back in the day when you could still ride up it. 

Felt so damn good!

Reply

araz
araz
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Here in Phoenix, I've found that sun sleeves -- I have some from Specialized -- can actually feel cooler than bare arms when it's hot out. They definitely look dorky, but then so do most pieces of biking clothing.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
+1 araz

Yeah, quite a few guys down here seem to swear by them, but never felt the need really myself, just have to make sure the heads covered properly and sunscreen on the face for sure, arms mostish of the times. 

"Here in Phoenix, I've found that sun sleeves -- I have some from Specialized -- can actually feel cooler than bare arms when it's hot out. They definitely look dorky, but then so do most pieces of biking clothing."

Reply

Timer
Timer
3 months ago
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer

Fair point. A lot comes down to personal predisposition. Thankfully, i don't overheat easily, just need to drink a lot. Which means a backpack is required just to carry all the water. But the backpack doesn't help with feeling cooler, obviously.

Although i do avoid black or dark coloured clothing in the heat, which makes a big difference. To my chagrin, lots of bike gear is only available in black or dark designs. Notably most pads, backpacks, lycra shorts, some helmets and gloves.

Reply

JVP
JVP
3 months ago
+2 Mike Ferrentino Andy Eunson

Also sun averse, but luckily in the land of conifers and ferns. I'm not overly fast to burn, but I grow bad things on my skin easily, with scars to prove it. 

As a prolific sunscreen wearer, I have no idea how you deal with the gooey mineral stuff while riding. I wear it while surfing, because reefs (long sleeve rash guards for the win), but man that stuff is thiiiiick and feels gross when it gets dusty. Really slow to apply, as well. Give me my Coppertone Sport or Banana Boat Sport.

When I lived on Oahu the joke was that all the haoles didn't like wearing sunscreen and would get constantly fried because they were desperate to get tan. My Asian and Polynesian friends just rolled their eyes as they religiously slathered up.

People are weird about sunscreen. Just use it.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
0

The gooey mineral stuff really only gets used across the bridge of my nose and cheeks, and even then it's a sometimes yes, sometimes no proposition. The rest of the time, I use some broad spectrum spf 75 Neutrogena shit that is somewhat less greasy but still is very noticeable. I'm increasingly wearing long sleeves when i ride, even in super hot weather, and slowly figuring out the relative SPF or lack thereof offered by the massive variety of clothing that has long sleeves...

Gloves are a relative new thing for me in the past five years. I went barehanded in about 1989 and never looked back. Blame it on the New Zealand upbringing. Then I began to have little things show up on my hands that needed to get burned off with nitrogen, so it was time to cover up. Yes, I really am that slow to learn some lessons...

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Meanwhile... In Aotearoa the spring has just started making its sweet promises.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
Pete Roggeman
3 months ago
0

Jealous that you're starting down the start of Spring while we count the end of the warm weather up here.

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
3 months ago
0

There's a reason for all those Endless Summer / Winter movies.

Variety is nice too.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
0

Judging from what my brothers in Nelson are saying, last week was a pretty impressive rinse cycle before spring...

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 months, 4 weeks ago
0

Yeah, the images out of Nelson are intense. Here in Welly it's just hundreds of slips.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Mike, my man, you always make me chuckle, such well penned descriptions in your pieces. 

While not anything near red haired and fair skinned, the sun is also my nemesis, especially since my hair decided I wore hats too much and decided to mostly depart. If I get caught out anytime after the sun gets more than 30 degrees up over the horizon in the morning and am not either wearing a hat or some form of head covering, I'm going to seriously regret it. Skin is overall fairly tanned living in the tropics, where everyone else always tells you you're so lucky to live there, but I'd give anything for a nice day that doesn't reach past 77f/25C and the  humidity isn't 70%>, heck right now I'd take 85F/30C.

That is very sad about that cyclist that lost his life, but we need to not be silly and using your common sense to not go out on 95F/35C+ day to ride a 32 mile, remote trail, solo is kind of like the absolute opposite of that.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
+1 Lynx .

I spent a couple weeks in Barbados at a vegan rasta mountain bike dude ranch back in the 90s. Riding every day, foraging for breadfruit, and trying to hang with these fit as hell dreadlocked guys, oof. I am not sure I have ever sweat so much in my entire life.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
0

Now that's very interesting Mike, care to expand on that? I have a few friends who were riding MTB in the 90s, but never knew of any MTB "Dude Ranches" here.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
+1 Lynx .

Whole thing was a bit of a boondoggle. This guy from the states, Ryan Hamilos, rich white dude with dreadlocks, was into mountain biking and had hooked up with some local dreadlocked mountain bikers. You live down there-ish, so I assume you are far more educated in the dread/straight animus that can at times exist. It was an education for me, for sure.

Anyway, these guys had a patch of land with a big rundown house, I think it was somewhere between Westmoreland and Holetown, but it was about 1995 and we were smoking weed by the fistful, so my memory is super spotty about the exact geo-details. They had access to some more land over on the east side of the island, and were running mtb day trips for tourists, and hoping to build up a whole lodge/eco-resort/trail center, but I think at some point Ryan lost interest or the dynamic between everyone changed. I was mostly hanging out with a former runway model named Eamon Healy-Singh (who I think is rescuing turtles in Tobago and trying to spread mtb stoke there now) and the very fit Bradley Babb (who had never been off the island but was ungodly quick on a bike. Last I heard he was doing permaculture work in New Mexico).

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
+2 Mike Ferrentino Andrew Major

Thanks for the story, will have to check with those I know who were MTBing back then and see if any of this rings a bell or not. Personally can't recall hearing about any Babbs riding MTBs, but there were a good group of guys riding back then and some of them had "questionable" at best hydration/fueling practices.

Guessing that on the east coast you'd have been riding the likes of Haggats, Springvale, Orange Trail, Hilaby, all sadly trails basically forgotten now in lieu of the new school thought of speed and jumps.

If you're ever looking to come back to visit, the MTB scene here is quite big now, so just give a heads up and you'll be shown the best, old and new school trails we have (I try my best to keep a few of the old school trails alive).

Reply

Macktrack
Scott McKelvey
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Living out here in Coachella Valley(as hot and more sun than Phoenix) the sun used to get to me, but started using PABA pills as a supplement (it used to be in sunscreen).  It has no real side effects other than helping your skin resist sun damage, and you feel like it’s healing you’re whole body too. Working up at the Bike Trip (I miss Pogonip) I didn’t have as much trouble, but am really enjoying our sun here in the dezert with that stuff. Keep up the good work, you inspired me all these years and I finally wrote a book (Health primarily, but talks up bikes too)!

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
0

PABA pills? Innnnteresting... I'll have to do some research into that. My doctor was trying to prescribe me doxycycline recently to deal with Rosacea symptoms, and was telling me "it'll be fine. It increases your skin's sensitivity to sun, but just layer up and stay indoors and you shouldn't have anything to worry about." Sigh... Also good to see another Bike Trip alum in here!

Reply

cyclotoine
cyclotoine
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

I live north of 60, half the riding season is fatbike season (helpful for maintenance as I can take my time overhauling the FS each winter). You can wear pants and long sleeves most of the on dirt season too. I struggle to feel like I get enough sun. We all take Vitamin D supplements.

Reply

morgan-heater
Morgan Heater
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

I, too, am a pale flower of the north. Which is why I live in the PNW. Even so, I experienced heat exhaustion for the first time last summer, pedaling at a local shuttle focused area where the climbing trail is exposed to the sun. I think if I had used electrolytes I might have been ok. It was a fairly horrible experience I hope to never repeat.

Reply

Lynx
Lynx .
3 months ago
0

Yeah, electrolytes definitely play a part and help if you're out in the sun, sweating and working hard, definitely make a world of difference to me when I take vs don't.

Reply

andy-eunson
Andy Eunson
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Burn and peel, burn and peel. The story of the summers of my youth. And I’ve done the Efudex treatment as a result more than once. I am fish belly white being of Scottish and French descent. Yet I am not bothered by the heat that much. Yeah the 43°C we had last summer was too much, but low 30s is not much of a problem for me. When I raced xc many years ago if it was hot I would parade around in the sun and proclaim how great the warmth  was in front of my fellow competitors who were melting in the shade already defeated. I have suffered mild heat stroke a couple times. 100% humidity at 39°C in Ottawa was one of those times. And another ti\me at a BC Cup here in Whistler at 35°C. First lap shiny and clean from my own sweat. Second lap shivering and no sweat. I think half the pack quit that race. I don’t race  anymore and I try and remember to put the sunscreen on in the morning but being well forested where I go it’s not too bad.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
+1 Andy Eunson

"shivering and no sweat"... I wish I could say that I don't know what you are talking about. Had that happen most recently in Baja a couple winters ago (it was still in the high 80s each day) at the end of a morning ride/photo shoot that ran long. It came on fast, almost out of nowhere. One minute, riding along fine but wishing there was some shade. Next minute, "hmmm, I don't seem to be sweating anymore." A couple minutes later, body shivering, slurring speech and barely able to turn the pedals home. The ride companions were all talking about what a lovely morning it was, eager to go swimming and then lay out to tan for a bit. I limped back to the hotel, chugged a quart of electrolyte drink and stood under a cold shower for a half hour, then passed out.

Reply

kcy4130
kcy4130
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

For hiking, or being out in the sun generally, I bought one of those sun hats. Basically a baseball cap with extra long bill and a cape down the back to cover one's neck. Game changer for me, I love that hat. But yeah, I don't do well in the heat. Riding when it's hot, it's all about limiting effort, limiting power output to avoid overheating. So things like slowly pushing the bike up a climb I'd normally ride up, and taking breaks anytime there's shade. It sucks, but still better than no ride at all.

Reply

mikeferrentino
Mike Ferrentino
3 months ago
+2 kcy4130 Dave Smith

Broad brimmed straw hats have become a necessity down here - 85 acres and a big garden means a ton of time spent during the hot months trying to keep the plants from spontaneously combusting. I go through about two a season but swear by the things. The amount of sun coverage they offer (as well as a huge "fuck you, sun" beard) allows me to reduce the amount of facial sunscreen use, a convenience that is offset by their propensity to blow away in the wind and eventually disintegrate all around where my head sweats through the straw...

Reply

Hbar
Hbar
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

This article is well written! it made me itchy and uncomfortable

Reply

alexdi
Alex D
3 months ago
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Lovely essay. When I was growing up as a ginger, tanning was in vogue and only an albino would reach for the maximum SPF 10. It wasn't until my early 20s that I started religiously wearing sunscreen. By my late 20s, I was all-in on dorky wide-brimmed safari caps and sunsleeves, and every year since, I've been scanned by a dermatologist to see which sins of youth seem inclined to be tomorrow's cancer. I look at people with even, olive skin with a mild and wistful envy. What it must be like to walk to the mailbox without reaching for a hat.

Reply

Suns_PSD
Suns_PSD
2 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I rather hate the heat and quite frankly don't think that us fair skinned individuals are genetically built for it.  I have an ace in the hole however with a dark grandmother that lends me some protection (thanks Meme!). Caucasian hair type holds in heat, higher metabolism creates more heat (this is why on the same diet blacks and Hispanics will end up with health problems that many whites won't), and not enough protective melanin.

One thing I would recommend to anyone that is fair skinned living in a sunny climate is using a Peptide called Melanotan. It will impart very significant sun protection. I use it during the summers for protection and to prevent sun damage and have for 10+ years. It also has the side effect of thickening your skin which is really helpful for bike crashes.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.