Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg
MIN MAX

Min-Max: Brian's 2015 Kona Process 111

Words Andrew Major
Photos Mr. Lungtastic
Date Jan 18, 2023
Reading time

It's A Process

Before the introduction to Min-Max Your Ride went live, I had already asked Brian (aka Mr. Lungtastic) if I could feature his 2015 Process 111 at some point. That was partially down to the build, which features a sweet selection of investment-grade products, like the discontinued Chris King PF92 pressfit bottom bracket and the rare 7.25x1.25" (184x44mm) CaneCreek IL air shock.

The most appealing reason to write about this rig though comes down to a certain psychology behind it that I've witnessed over many years, and which I believe is rooted in almost every bike featured in this series. That is the fact that Brian's been talking about his next bike for almost as long as he's owned this thing.

Instead, he just keeps servicing the suspension and Chris King hubs and bottom bracket, replacing worn components on his 11-spd XT drivetrain, and making strategic upgrades like the 180mm OneUp dropper and Wolf Tooth Geoshift -2° angleset.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 2

The Process 111 rivals the same generation of Honzo ST as Kona's all-time cult hit of a bicycle. But apparently, they didn't carry the model forward as most riders didn't really get it.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 3

Brian has squeezed in a long travel dropper post, is eeking out every millimeter of quality travel, and has combined over-forking with an angleset to update the geometry.

The Process 111 is and always was, heavy for a frame that doesn't quite pump out 5" of rear-wheel travel. It's telling that when the 111mm rear and 120mm front 29" was released in 2014, Kona categorized it as an Enduro bike. Some of that weight comes down to the huge bearings that are well-shielded, and this generation of Kona has proven rather bombproof, and who even cares about weight? It turns out Brian does. His XC-racing background prevents him from dismissing those concerns.

He was already torn between a large and an XL when he bought the bike and has some regrets about going with the smaller size when he tests bikes with longer Reach numbers. The combination of the 20 mm over-forked front end and the Wolf Tooth angleset change the fit as well.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 4

PUSH Industries' solution to upgrade damper performance on Fox 34 FIT forks circa 2012. Adjustable high and low-speed compression.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 7

Sometimes Brian wishes for more travel, sometimes less weight with similar suspension numbers, but Process 111 always gets things done.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 6

The CCDB IL Air is a great shock in terms of long-term product support from Cane Creek and maximizing suspension performance from 111mm of travel.

Oddities & Ends

Two of the neatest bits on Brian's bike are the PF92 Chris King bottom bracket and the PUSH RC2 damper upgrade for older CTD forks like Brian's 34. The PUSH kit predates their current HC97, and it was a huge upgrade for that generation of Fox forks. I loved mine, and my brother is still running it to this day.

I haven't been able to get an answer about why Chris King stopped producing their Pressfit 24 bottom bracket. Between Shimano's entire crank lineup and the excellent RaceFace Aeffect R arms, it seems to me there are plenty of 24mm spindle cranks on the market, and frames with the Pressfit-92 standard are also still plentiful. In any event, Brian's BB has been in his frame since the beginning and is still better than new after a routine service.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 11

Big-big bearings that are well shielded throughout, and a quality 11-spd XT drivetrain.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 8

Always pull the snap rings and seals before servicing a Chris King bottom bracket.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 12

A Blackspire 30t narrow-wide ring bolted to a classic XT 4/104-round crankset.

The New Bike Dance

At the start, this series could have just been an endless wave of horizontally-shocked Process bikes like Brian's alternating with KS-Link Banshees. The number of potential submissions was surprising. But coupled with that was a number of riders who e-mailed me to see if I knew anyone, or I myself, wanted to buy their 111, 134, or 153 Process rig.

One thing those Banshee and Kona bikes have in common, other than big bearings and relatively bombproof construction, is that neither is well suited to the transportation of a water bottle inside the main triangle. As we know, that matters to a greater-enough number of riders than not now that both brands are selling vertically shocked, Trunnion-mount equipped, bikes these days.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 13

Bri's Process is always ready to head into the woods. These 2nd generation Process rigs were unique looking and uniquely suitable for long-term ownership.

In addition to usable water bottle mounts, over the last eight-to-ten years we've seen Reach numbers grow, seat tube angles become steeper, seat tubes become shorter, and head angles get slacker. There's also the whole Boost hub and fork spacing thing. The Process 111 was the first production trail bike designed specifically for use with a 1x drivetrain, but for most bikes from 2014, the suspension kinematics have changed substantially as well.

All reasoning aside, there's also that desire to try something new coupled with the knowledge that a test ride or two isn't the same as dialing in a bike to your personal setup and dialing in your personal setup to a bike, over time.

Mr. Lungtastic has considered a Rolodex of potential future dance partners like the fresh Kona Hei Hei, Specialized Stumpjumper, Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol - or maybe a Smash, the Transition Spur, or maybe a Santa Cruz Tallboy or Blur. That probably doesn't dent the full litany but generally the rational is the same; improve descending performance or at least maintain what the 111 brings to the trail, and ditch a bunch of weight at the same time.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 10

CushCore Trail (XC) balances added weight with support and durability boost for lighter casing rubber.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 5

Dig, ride, repeat - Live Like Vic. The limited edition stem cap joins a Chromag Ranger stem and Renthal 31.8 bar.

Kona Process 111 2015 NSMB Andrew Major Brian Berg 9

Maximizing drop. Looking at the seat mast on the 111 is a reminder that no one knew 200mm+ dropper posts were in the near future.

The crux of it all is that a Process 111 frame is worth next to nothing at this point, barely a dent in the frame-only prices of any of those bikes, and chances are a new fork and headset would be on the bill too. Plus front and rear spacer kits to Boostinate the Chris King hubs. Selling his Kona complete and buying a new bike is an even more daunting equation assuming Brian wants to stick with an XT build, top-end suspension, high-end hubs, etc.

Spending the money up front on workhorse componentry, amortizing it over many years, and riding his Process a ton, has made Bri's cost of ownership relatively cheap, and at this point, ongoing maintenance - replacing pads, rotors, drivetrain bits, and rubber - keeps this bike low-cost for the performance compared to ponying up the money for a fresh rig.

Thanks for submitting your Kona, Brian. For anyone else interested in submitting your bike to min-max, please fire me an e-mail.

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Comments

danithemechanic
danithemechanic
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+12 bushtrucker Andrew Major Cr4w ElBrendo Nick Maffei imnotdanny bishopsmike Etacata Tremeer023 Zero-cool Velocipedestrian jgoon

So stoked there's a new min-max article!

Now i'll go read it.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+12 Cr4w WasatchEnduro bishopsmike DanL Dan Etacata dhr999 danithemechanic Tremeer023 papa44 Velocipedestrian bushtrucker

I have a few more in the works, and, of course, always eager for submissions!

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+4 bushtrucker xchngd silverbansheebike Velocipedestrian

First thought: Wow someone submitted THE min-max bike we all wanted!

Second thought: Oh its staged. You asked him!

The only real answer for Brian regarding what to do with the Process when it's new bike day is not the economical one. You can't send it out to cheap bike pasture after being your stalwart companion for coming on a decade.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 bushtrucker Lu Kz Derek Baker

Hahahaha, I knew I was getting called out. This year there will be a few ‘staged’ pieces where I’ll reach out to do a hit on a bike I’d like to see.

But there are already some fresh submissions as well. I’d like to keep the series going.

Reply

Joe_Dick
Adrian Bostock
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 Andrew Major doodersonmcbroseph DanL

I had a 111 for a few years. I ended up bumping the fork up to 140mm and ditched the 11speed drive train for a 10speed 1x. 

the geometry is dated now but it was the first full suspension bike in many year which I actually got along with. It’s a surprisingly capable bike and the reach was way ahead of its time, plus they are and bombproof.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

Sized-up, over-forked, and anglesetted they get you as close to current as any production rig from ‘14. Bombproof as you say, and the pivots are very low maintenance.

In terms of maximizing current performance expectations at the minimum cost? Hard to go wrong, I know some folks who’ve picked these up for a song used. It’s the one time no bottle cage and pre-Boost is a real win. 

———

How long did you keep yours? What did you replace it with? 

I’m not surprised most folks I knew with one have moved on to something else (it’s almost a decade old design, etc.).

Reply

Joe_Dick
Adrian Bostock
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 bushtrucker Andrew Major WasatchEnduro

If I remember correctly I picked it up in the spring of 2015 and sold it in late 2017. the next full suspension bike I bought was  next generation Process 153. This was during a brief time in my life when industry deals made it make sense to flip bikes every year or so. I sold the 153 in march of 2020 for 1/2 of what it would have been worth 2 months later! 😂 

One of my riding partners is still on a 2014 111 and it’s going strong. He occasionally talks about buying a new bike, but I suspect he’ll be riding this bike until his kids move out!

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+2 bushtrucker Adrian Bostock

I’d say it’s a bike where that possibility exists at least. I don’t know of a bike (including the newer gen Process rigs) where the bearings last longer and they’re certainly overbuilt. 

Did your friend size up? That seems to be a question that influences the decision.

I was on a Large 134 (instead the the medium) and I think with a Angleset and over-fork or maybe mullet setup that I could still greatly enjoy that rig.

Reply

Joe_Dick
Adrian Bostock
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 bushtrucker Andrew Major Mammal

I don’t think he sized up. I dont think he has ridden a new bike so probably has no comparison. and I am pretty sure this was a major upgrade from him at the time of purchase. 

as a rule If you want to stay happy with your current bike, do maintenance (not repairs) and don’t test ride your buds new super bike. 

having a real small recreation budget helps too.

since I moved to a drive through town where most people do not even pump their brakes on the way to more hashtagable locations, the people I ride with tend with have bikes which would qualify for this min part of this series, often with out the max. it also helps a lot that the terrain does not eat bikes.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+4 bushtrucker DanL Zero-cool Velocipedestrian

“as a rule If you want to stay happy with your current bike, do maintenance (not repairs) and don’t test ride your buds new super bike.”

Absolutely.

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

I think the series is fun in terms of seeing how / why a bike is different than stock. Stuff broke, wore out, or was replaced to make the rig more fit for purpose (even if the purpose changed from the bikes intention - adult Lego).

If you come across something interesting encourage them to submit it?!

mhaager2
Moritz Haager
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 Andrew Major dhr999 silverbansheebike

That photo truly is one of the best I have seen, and also agree the min max series is one of my favorites. 

You say to always remove the snap rings to service the CK BB. I havr always used the grease injection tool they used to sell,  but don't anymore. Did they stop selling that because it isn't as effective at removing dirty grease,  or because it results in overfilled bearings, or some other reason do you know? 

I had emailed CK asking why they discontinued the PF BBs and the answer I got was there just wasn't enough demand.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+1 dhr999

I use the grease tool and I think it does a great job, but you always want to remove the snap-ring and seal first. That way the tool can really purge the old grease and you don’t get a seal-hematorrhea

I’ve seen way too many King BB’s done at shops where the seal is bubbled out under the snap ring after.

Reply

DanL
DanL
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 bushtrucker Andrew Major dhr999

What a lovely bike and article, Andrew, thanks!

The 2015 process 153 was my first "proper" and first expensive FS bike. Although it's definitely coloured by that nostalgia, it was an excellent bike for me to progress on and importantly, learn to work on. Big easy bearings which pressed in/pulled out in a straightforwards manner, forks that taught me lowers servicing easily, no internal routing, lots of opportunities to play with drivetrains and the I could upgrade/ tryout several parts when I could sniper them in secondhand deals. Great customer/technical service from Kona as well which really helped too.

Very playful to ride, side hits and jumps were a joy, it was a little flexy in some situations but that could also be used to pop out of corners sometimes and it held up well in WBP as well as the rest of the sea to sky - well it had to, it was my only bike. I was stoked to sell it on to a kid who was just as excited as I was when I bought it.
I'm not a big fan of the current Kona process lineup though which seems to have gone a bit ugly if you're not buying a plastic frame.

Reply

mammal
Mammal
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

Loving the min/max. 

Did he upgrade the airspring in that fork? A damper upgrade is good, but by far the biggest issue with that generation Fox is the air spring. I've got the same fork, and after much conversation with Suspension Werx (7 different combos of upgrade possibilities), I went with just upgrading to the 2015 air spring + 2015 FIT seal head. Jame's opinion was "FIT damper in those forks were good, but the air spring was a pile of shyte".  $380 including the full rebuild, and it's an awesome fork.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

Yeah, this was previously a gen-5 TALAS system. I think between the air upgrade and the damper, the fork feels on par with anything Fox has on the market right now.

SWerx did the work on the fork.

Reply

xchngd
xchngd
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

Great article and series sometimes makes me think I should have kept my 2016 Enduro longer. 

I hate to be "that guy" but what trail is the armoured rock feature on?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+1 dhr999

Thank you!

That photo is on TNT on Mt Seymour.

It’s a cool section as it looks very different from different angles.

Reply

xchngd
xchngd
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

Thanks! You are right, it is a total chameleon.

Reply

mudhoney
mudhoney
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

Different spot on TNT, the armoured section Brian is riding is a new bit Martin built recently, this is an original bit lower on the trail

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+1 mudhoney

Ahhhhh. Thanks Penny, you are, of course, correct. 

I have a photo somewhere of the new section from a different angle as well, so I’ll blame my poor trail memory :-).

Reply

mudhoney
mudhoney
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

I do have the advantage of doing some trail work in both of these spots ;)

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Home court advantage. Even so, those sections are chameleons the way you can photograph them from different angles, but I shouldn't have fallen for my own magic trick.

micah356
micah356
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

There is actually a pretty decent way to fit a bottle cage on the 111. The cutout in the 'Blackburn Chicane' bottle cage fits quite tightly onto the cable guide tie down on the 111's downtube. And then you just put two heavy duty zip ties around the frame and cage where the bolt holes of the cage are. I don't have my 111 anymore, but I rode it like that for at least a year with no issues. Layer of electrical tape under the zip ties to prevent slippage. Cables zip tie to the cage instead of to the original mount.

Reply

silverbansheebike
silverbansheebike
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+1 Andrew Major

Love it! I've only ever once ridden a 153, and was pretty thrown off by how flexy the rear end felt coming off of my Banshee. But its sick to see that despite that they last forever! It is pretty funny to me that 2 brands keep coming up, kudos to them!

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+2 silverbansheebike bushtrucker

It certainly says something about the KS-Link bikes and Process platforms and perhaps also the folks who bought them.

Reply

flattire2
Brian Tuulos
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

That seat angle tho!... yikes.  Once you get used to steep seat angle bike for the grunty climbs, you can never go back.  To each their own.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+5 bushtrucker Vik Banerjee dhr999 Velocipedestrian Spencer Nelson

Not intended as a personal criticism - it’s something I see all the time - but I’d love folks to write “once I got used to…” instead of “once you get used to…”

It’s great that frame designers found a way to accommodate short chainstays with 29” wheels AND longer Reach dimensions without overly lengthy effective top tubes, and it’s even better that this setup works for a lot of riders; however, there’s an implied universality to steep seat angles that doesn’t exist in the real world.

I’m glad there are still companies that are trying to balance Reach and STA so there are fit experiences aside from the super steep STAs that truly came about for pedal-and-plunge riding.

Reply

MTB_THETOWN
MTB_THETOWN
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+4 Andrew Major GB Zero-cool bushtrucker

I've been conciously trying to voice my opinions using I statements instead of You statements and it instantly makes things less confrontational. When I tell someone "you should do this", it's never taken as well as "I did this and it worked for me."

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

Sounds awesome to me.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+1 bushtrucker

You should stop doing this. 

I don't do this and it works for me.

hehehe.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

Hahahaha. Ass. :-)

Reply

zombo
Zombo
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

I had a 111 with a -2 angleset.  A couple weeks before I sold the frame, I threw a 160mm Lyrik on there just for the hell of it.  I was walking up everything because the seat angle was so slack.  It was a ripper on the downs though.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

How unbalanced is too unbalanced is always a fun question - especially coming from a hardtail. The suspension worked well front/rear with the 160mm?

At some point you get a chopper certainly. The static geo chart is with a 120mm fork.

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Velocipedestrian

You've heard the old joke that many a bike from the past would be significantly better if we swapped the STA and HTA? 

That said, I wouldn't say no to riding that beauty around a pump track.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+3 Andrew Major Vik Banerjee bushtrucker

I went back! I had a 2022 Range (77.25 ESTA, for the record) and sold it in favour of keeping my ~75-76 degree STA bikes. Was it nice on stupid climbs up absolutely dumb stuff? Sure. Was there a compromise elsewhere? Boy howdy was there. Of course, 75/76 is quite a bit steeper than the decade old Process 111, but you can still find many Internet Ergonomics Experts complaining that bikes with those numbers are too slack. 

I'd consider a Range again with a custom build in a size smaller, but then the seated reach would be so short I'd be hitting my knees on the handlebars in seated turns. Oh the fit conundrum!

Maybe YOU can never go back. Ha!

Also, I don't know if the point of these articles are for people who have things like 2022 Ranges or Privateers or whatever to read it and go "hmm, you know what, I think I need to go back and pick up a 2014 Banshee/Kona. That's what my riding is missing!".

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+2 Lu Kz bushtrucker

I’ve had the opportunity to ride quite a few bikes. For a dually I prefer somewhere around a 75d STA (whatever effective number it takes for me to have the equivalent of an actual 75d at climbing height that is) and on the hardtail closer to 74d. 

Of the longer travel bikes I’ve ridden nothing has fit me as well as the large Banshee Titan once mulleted in terms of the balance of pedaling position, Reach, ample Stack, front-rear weight distribution (long stays), etc. I was running it with a 170mm fork and -1d angleset. It’s a bike I wish more people - riders and designers - could throw a leg over.

———

Also, I don't know if the point of these articles are for people who have things like 2022 Ranges or Privateers or whatever to read it and go "hmm, you know what, I think I need to go back and pick up a 2014 Banshee/Kona. That's what my riding is missing!".

Hahahaha. Sell your new carbon Nomad and buy a 2014 Kona Process 153 - over-forked with an Angleset, mulleted, etc. 

Yeah, no. Although, I had two people on the latest greatest tell me after the Nomad min-max went live that they thought with a size bigger than they used to ride that V3 Nomad could easily work for them still if that’s what means allowed - riding all the same stuff they do on their current rigs! That’s strong praise.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

"V3 Nomad could easily work for them still if that’s what means allowed"

There's a used Santa Cruz price joke here, Andrew, but I wouldn't want to flog that horse more than I already have in these articles. 

Oh wait I did it again.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
+4 Lu Kz GB gubbinalia bushtrucker

Hahaha. You know I meant if they couldn’t afford to ride the latest-greatest. You have me on a tangent now though.

.

I usually avoid relative price conversations for a few reasons.

  1. I’m an ‘amortize your life’ kinda guy. How much longer do you need to own super bike 1 vs. super bike 2 to make up $1000 difference on a $15,000 bike really?
  2. Buying the right thing once is always cheaper than buying the wrong thing first and then buying the right thing. I won’t name bikes here, but I’ve known a few people who took a bath on a ‘best complete value’ bike after a year of disliking it. This is also why I think custom builds can be the better value for a rider with the treasure who knows what they want.
  3. I prefer much more in-depth value conversations than just comparing the price of two similar spec. bikes.
  4. SRP pricing is an aspirational imaginary number often unwedded to dealer margins or realities (like how much work does it take to properly build the bike out of the box). Covid was a weird time but, particularly for high-end bikes, I’m excited to start hearing about street price again. Some bikes look like better values because of razor thin margins (for dealers, I’m sure those manufacturers do fine).

Anyway, sorry for the long preamble.

This summer I had a conversation with another rider where he first lamented the standard trope of how “over-priced” Santa Cruz bikes are now - after having owned a couple - such that he bought something different than the SCB rig he was looking at.

The he started whinging that he wished his new rig used nice pivot hardware like SCB instead of cheap sh*t, that his bearings didn’t last a season, and that it took over a month for a minor warranty claim.

In the moment I settled on platitudes but as soon as I arrived home I had to look both rigs up. About a grand at 10K CAD. So 10% savings.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 3 days ago
0

I should probably add some disclaimer that I’ve never owned a Santa Cruz, I’ve never reviewed any of their full suspension bikes (hardtails only), and if I had proper super-bike money to spend on a rig today (like today-today)  it would be something weird like a Foes Mixer with custom geometry, not something I see on the back of every 4th bike rack on the North Shore.

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

Oh look, here's Andrew replying to himself to cap the reply chain.

Regarding SCB, we've had the conversation before regarding the value of the 10 year commitment (bearings and aftermarket support cost money, too) the Cruz does that nobody else is at least willing to write down. If you can afford them, they're certainly an option. People can complain as much as they want on the internet about the price, but their bikes have such a general competence to them that I don't see anybody who picks one up having many bad things to say about owning one (provided they purchased the correct category of bike). They're just kind of..... good?

I do have some thoughts about whether as much of this value is transferred to a used SCB purchaser as some folks seem to think it does, however.

--------------------------------

"SRP pricing is an aspirational imaginary number often unwedded to dealer margins or realities....."

I remember when a particular unnamed Brand came to us with their next-year dealer book with the various levels of margin. It turns out even at their top tier dealers, that brand thought all of their customers were their buddies because for MY2018*, everybody's getting the cost-plus margin normally reserved for friends, particularly loyal/good customers, and only the most shrewd of bargain seekers. Thanks, Brand!

*I dont remember if it was 17/18/19.

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 2 days ago
+2 Lu Kz GB

Hahaha. Reply chain 0.1%’er over here… now to jerk prices up like I’m selling food staples and my last name’s Weston.

.

I’ve been working on a good bike v. great bike piece for five years as a follow up to other stuff I’ve written on the subject. I agree SCB are good mountain bikes for most folks assuming they but the right category. Trek (at least their current rigs) and Specialized also make good bikes.

What’s the difference between good and great?

Beauty’s in the eye of the bike owner but there’s a performance metric too. 

.

Every big brand: “We care about our independent dealer network and their contributions to the soul of mountain biking.”

aztech
aztech
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Andrew Major

It absolutely could. I rode a V3 Nomad 2-4 times a week for 8 years. Held up great, and certainly didn’t hold me back. I changed frame bearings each year and never had cause to use their warranty. The SCB pricing makes more sense when amortised over that time length.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

What did you end up replacing it with?

aztech
aztech
2 weeks, 1 day ago
+1 Andrew Major

A 2022 Bronson. End of last year I rode a friend’s new Sentinel while we were doing cone cornering drills. Fully expected the 1260mm WB and way longer reach to handle like a boat, but it felt far more balanced and well-proportioned than my L Nomad, and so the upgrade fire was lit. Hoping I get another 8 years out of this one!

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

Counterpoint, if the seated position is good for Brian, then when the saddle is dropped he'll feel like he has more room than on a steeper STA frame.

Reply

Gomphiasis
Gomphiasis
2 weeks, 2 days ago
0

That's an amazing bike, I'm dreaming about it every night... The lonely life of a biker sounds like that

Reply

OLDF150
Kerry Williams
2 weeks, 1 day ago
0

So much to comment on here, but will try to keep it brief, lol.  First off, I had a 2016 Process 153 which I absolutely loved, and still has me wondering if my next bike will be another Kona.  But, sold it when I broke my tibial plateau and bought an Instinct BC once I was ready to ride again. The whole time I had the 153, I dreamed of getting a 111, thinking of doing long days on a capable short travel machine.  After breaking my other tibial 2 years after the first, it was definitely time to slow my 53 yo body down and went to a trail bike, a 2020 Fuel Ex with all the carbon goodies. Love it, and will have it for a long time making it a future Min/Max.  Andrew, when does a bike become a Min/Max candidate, because I plan on having this Mulsanne blue Trek a looonnnng time.

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