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Three Versions Reviewed

Michelin Wild Enduro Tire Review

Words AJ Barlas
Photos AJ Barlas
Date Nov 18, 2020
Reading time

Michelin is slowly but steadily pushing back into the imaginations of mountain bikers. Two years ago when I reviewed the Wild AM – a tire sharing some similarities to the Wild Enduro Rear – there was little fanfare for Michelin tires and there were only a few options available for aggressive trail riding. The Wild Enduro was released that year but they were hard to find. Nevertheless, we saw athletes like Sam Hill racing the Enduro World Series on Michelins and back in 2017 during his push for the title against Hill, Adrien Dailly was riding on the prototypes.

They’ve been available for a while, though demand and supply limitations thanks to COVID-19 have made it harder to find them. With fond memories involving Michelin tires 20 years ago when I first started racing, and more recently with their Wild Rock'R2 – a tire I reached for in dry conditions – I was eager to check out the new treads.

Michelin Wild Enduro Highlights

  • Available in 29 and 27.5
  • Two front tire rubber compounds available: Gum-X3D and Magi-X²
  • Front and rear-specific tire carcass and tread pattern
    • 3 x 60 TPI front tire carcass
    • 3 x 33 TPI rear tire carcass
  • Weight:
    • Front GumX3D (29 x 2.4): 1,058g
    • Front Magi-X (29 x 2.4): 1,073g
    • Rear GumX3D (29 x 2.4): 1,156g
  • MSRP: Gum-X3D – 64.99 USD, 77.99 CAD / Magi-X² – 69.99 USD, 83.99 CAD
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The Wild Enduro tire tread looks similar to the Wild AM I previously tested, but it's been beefed up in every way.

A Different Approach to Tires

When Michelin released the Wild Enduro in 2018, what first caught my attention was the three options available in each wheel size. Where many tire brands push the softer, stickier tire as their top option, Michelin took a different approach and it confused people. With the Wild Enduro, the updated Magi-X² compound, which was previously the softer, more grippy compound, became the rubber that "targets experienced riders and experts due to the outstanding grip it delivers at speed.” Michelin moved from the more typical and easy to understand, softer and grippier terminology to focusing on a rider's skill level. This left many, myself included, questioning whether the previously preferred softer and stickier-the-better – and past Michelin front tire compound choice – was suitable for use by regular hacks.

When Michelin updated the Magi-X compound, the base of the tread and lugs were made firmer so they could better hold their shape, while a softer, slower rebounding rubber than that found on the Gum-X3D was introduced to the exposed surface. After riding the tires for the last few months including back-to-back, it makes sense. But before that, I found the descriptions of the tire compounds confusing. Maybe I just didn’t want to believe what I was hearing – I mean, a harder, stiffer lug… what?

The concept for the Gum-X3D is more familiar and can be found on tires from brands like Maxxis with their 3C tire compound. It features a firmer base with soft corner lugs and a more durable but still soft center lug. It’s supposed to provide a hard-wearing tire that rolls reasonably well while still providing grip when leaned over on its edge. The base layer of the Gum-X3D tires isn’t as stiff as the Magi-X² while the exposed tread is firmer, and faster rebounding. It creates an overall softer lug that isn’t as grippy as the Magi-X².

Michelin also took a different approach with the carcass. Where many brands utilize a 60 or 120 TPI casing, mixing multiple layers with various other materials inserted to prevent flat tires, Michelin chose to use a thicker 33 TPI material for the rear tire. The front uses the more common 60 TPI material and each tire consists of three layers. Despite this, the sidewalls felt thinner than I expected and for riders familiar with Maxxis tires, the Wild Enduro front felt similar to an EXO, while the rear felt like an EXO+.

With the tires each using three layers of material, I was surprised how much of a difference the 33 TPI construction made to the rear tire. The larger threads made for a thicker feeling sidewall but I never would have imagined it being so pronounced. Handling the Magi-X² front tire, the stiffer base rubber made a noticeable difference to the feel of the carcass compared with the Gum-X3D options.

Coming from a set of Maxxis DoubleDown tires, the carcass of the Michelins worried me and I assumed there’d be flat tires in my future. A strip of material is added to the rear tire for pinch flat prevention but the EXO+ tires also include comparable protection and I haven’t found those to be enough for the rear of my bike. A clear benefit of the construction was the lighter weight of the Michelin tires compared to the Assegai/DHF DD tires they replaced, saving between 80g (rear) and 240 grams (front). It’s surprising how close in weight the rear tire is to my DHF DD because the difference felt in the sidewall is significant; the Michelin feels much thinner.

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Front and rear, the treads look similar but the differences are noticeable on the trail. The front tire features larger, taller, more well-spaced blocks and sheds mud well. The rear tread is tighter with shorter lug heights to improve rolling speed.

The Skid Test

Michelin’s focus on front and rear-specific carcass options is great. With most riders encountering trouble with flats in the rear, it makes less sense to run thick treads at both ends. Until recently the grippy compounds we all want from a front tire have been limited to the thicker tire casings, leaving many of us with more tire than needed out front. There’s no need for that here with the thinner, more comfortable 60 TPI casing of the front tire providing a pleasant feeling, while the stiffer 33 TPI rear tire takes the rear wheel abuse.

The construction also produces a lighter front tire despite using the same layering as the rear, though some of the weight savings would be thanks to the pinch protection at the bead of the rear tire. Tread patterns of the two also differ slightly, with the rear tire featuring shorter lugs than the front and there's less spacing between the smaller blocks and less ramping, so the rear tire can provide traction when putting down power. Climbing traction was good, as was stability when braking hard. They pulled up surprisingly quick too, something I didn’t expect with all the small, disconnected blocks.

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Despite its bigger lugs, the front tire in either compound is ~100g lighter than the rear.

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The rear tire's 33 TPI construction and pinch protection layer at the bead are the reason for the added weight.

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Both the 33 TPI rear and 60 TPI front tires are constructed with three layers of material.

I mounted both tires to a set of WTB KOM Tough rims, with an internal width of 29mm. I found the profile of the tires, particularly the front, more square than I was used to with the large side lugs extending well up the outer edges. I’d be lying to say it didn’t concern me but my experience with the Rock'R2 had proven positive, with their side lugs holding strong and hooking through corners and across off-camber sections. At the time they were the best, aggressive cornering tire I’d ridden. The insatiable grip and support of the side lugs begged to be hammered into corners.

Riding the Michelin Wild Enduro Tires

Testing the Gum-X3D tires first, I found the softer base of the front to be a bit skittish in loose over hard terrain and on rock slabs. I also found the cornering transition to be unnerving, initially. Coming from the neutral transition of the Assegai, the Wild Enduro had a moment of weightlessness that felt odd when banking the bike. In soft, loose terrain or on wet hand-built trails, the tire performed great and when temperatures dipped, the softer lugs were beneficial. After becoming more familiar with the Wild Enduro, I began pushing it more aggressively and found that once the corner lugs are loaded confidently, the tire whips through turns in softer terrain. On hard pack surfaces such as surfaced roads on the way to the trail, the front tire squirmed too much for my liking. The rear tire, with its shorter lugs, felt great everywhere.

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Similar to the Wild Rock'R2, the corner lugs feature reliefs along the outer edge.

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The side lugs of the Wild Enduro rear don't stand as tall as the front and don't include the ramped leading edge. The centre lugs have a rounded lead edge but not the ramping of the front tire.

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The front tire's ramped leading edges help improve rolling resistance. They roll comparably to the Assegai but their lighter weight is easier to spin up to speed.

Swapping to the stiffer Magi-X² rubber significantly improved cornering on firm terrain. During summer conditions, the Magi-X² was far more supportive, responding better to aggressive riding on all surfaces while the slower rebounding rubber provided heaps of grip in the loose dust. I never felt that the Gum-X3D front tire was able to hold up and support itself in these conditions and it damn near killed me in a couple of instances. Pushing hard across sections riddled with solid rock, the lugs of the Gum-X tire would squirm and give out. On machine-built trails where the surface is hard, they were also less predictable than the Magi-X². The Magi-X² was the ticket and let me ride without concern in any terrain, so long as temperatures were ’normal’ (15ºC and up).

But when things cooled down, the tread of the Magi-X² front tire stiffened too much. Across root beds where the tire doesn’t touch anything but for a short period, the Magi-X² began to struggle. It lost composure as the cold weather – between 5–10 degrees Celsius – made it difficult for the tread to conform to the ground. The slow rebounding rubber also became too slow and the tire's rolling speed felt like it suffered considerably, requiring more effort to keep it moving forward when climbing on firm surfaces.

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The Magi-X² front tire was unreal when riding like you want to destroy every corner, and offered assurance on all surfaces encountered, provided it wasn't Canadian* levels of cold out. (*Ed note: you can't hear the accent when he writes, but AJ is Aussie, so what he means is these were 'West Coast Canadian' temps)

At this point, I switched back to the Gum-X3D front tire and it improved handling. The softer, faster rebounding tread was better able to perform in the cold, wet conditions. It still struggles with rock slabs, where I find it squirms if riding hard, but my level of aggression has cut back considerably in these conditions. Everywhere else it provides excellent grip and composure.

Throughout most of the test, the rear tire remained on the bike. Despite the braking edge of the corner lugs wearing quickly, it continued to work well. Cornering and braking were impacted by the early wear to the side lugs and a number of them have nearly torn completely off. With more than 400kms on the tire, the centre lugs still have some life left, with the edge remaining somewhat intact, but the corner lugs are beyond gone. They had a hard life, with heaps of descending thanks to some big park days when the trails were at their most abrasive. For reference, the MaxxGrip DHR and DHF tires in the rear of my bikes have each managed more than 500km of service before being deemed unusable but the High Roller II I had on when summer first hit only got ~350km before being useless.

My concerns about flatting during the test were unwarranted and although I tried to make it happen, I haven’t flatted once. That’s with no inserts and plenty of rimmers, causing dings to both the front and rear wheels. There's an amount of luck involved for sure but I’ve not been so fortunate on other tires with similar feeling sidewalls. I also tried running the Gum-X3D front as a rear for a bit but needed an insert for support. With this setup I bottomed the tire hard against the rim, dinging it through the insert but surprisingly, still no flat. This probably has more to do with the insert than the tire but I was surprised nonetheless.

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The rear tire looks worse for wear after going beyond 400kms, much of which was in dry, abrasive conditions.

Room for Improvement

Michelin's Wild Enduros have been more purpose-specific than any others I’ve ridden. That can be a good thing, offering excellent performance in certain areas but it also adds complexity. Aggressive riding in dry conditions and rocky terrain suits the Magi-X² front but when it gets cold and damp, the softer Gum-X3D performs better. Warmer (15º C and higher) wet riding with the Magi-X² was great. This adds another cost and involves more time faffing with setups.

After less than six rides, including a day in the Whistler Bike Park that exceeded 6,000 metres of descending, the rear tire began to look worse for wear. The rear corner of the side lugs had begun to tear away from the firmer material underneath and some of them showed signs of tearing completely off. Surprisingly, the centre tread didn’t show the same wear and had much more life. I left them on. They remained strong performers but the cornering and braking characteristics declined from that point.

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Before I realized I needed to increase tire pressure from my regular level to get the support needed…

I squeezed good life out of the rear tire but I still find they have a shorter life span than others. They feel great on the trail and brake sensationally, but they aren’t a huge improvement over other rear tires. I also had an issue with the sidewalls wearing, eventually resulting in sealant oozing out through the threads. The weeping hasn’t happened to the front yet but I would like to see a tougher casing, both front and rear, to prevent this and provide more support on the trails. During testing, I had to increase tire pressures by 2psi to get the support needed from the sidewalls, as the thinner material allowed the tires to fold and burp, particularly the front.

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Conclusions

The Michelin Wild Enduro tires offer great grip and surprising support in the right situation from a lighter weight package. The tires have been tough against hits and the front to rear-specific carcass and tread patterns excel in many situations but they’re not as set-and-forget as some others. There are limitations to how aggressively the Gum-X3D front can be pushed and while the Magi-X² takes everything thrown its way in warmer conditions, its firmer tread base and slow rubber hinder it when things get cold and wet.

With a tougher casing (rumours have it those are on the way), the tires stand to be more durable and provide aggressive riders with increased support when things get rowdy. But if you find the carcass of Schwalbe’s Super Gravity or the Maxxis DoubleDown tires to be excessive, then the Michelin Wild Enduro in its current state is a great alternative.

More info on the Michelin Wild Enduro.

AJ_Barlas
AJ Barlas

Age: 39
Height: 191cm/6’3"
Weight: 73kg/160lbs
Ape Index: 1.037
Inseam: 32”
Trail on Repeat: Changes as often as my mood.
Current Regular: Every test product spends time on Entrail

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Comments

luisgutierod
+3 AJ Barlas Metacomet Pete Roggeman
luisgutierod  - Nov. 18, 2020, 3:12 a.m.

great review man ! All reviews should go to the effects temperature has on performance. My experience with these is hat for aggressive riding (and fast trails) front works fantastic with cushcore, as well as the rear.. however rocky abrasive terrain is a durability issue for sure.. for which I would switch to Wild Rockr2 in GumX.. for technical loamy damped conditions, the enduro f/r combo works great.. If your OCD allows for it.. WE Front & DH34 rear is amazing combination as well.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 18, 2020, 5:49 a.m.

Def keen to check out the DH treads. Does the DH34 mount up all good?

Reply

luisgutierod
+1 AJ Barlas
luisgutierod  - Nov. 18, 2020, 6 a.m.

no issues, tried on some I9 grades and NOBL TR33s, no prob at all.

Reply

momjijimike
+2 AJ Barlas WasatchEnduro
momjijimike  - Nov. 18, 2020, 4:13 a.m.

I had the Magi-X and Gum-X last year from Dez to Jan and I didn't liked them. At low temp, NO grip eg. on roots, crashed on parts on the trail where I never ever had any problems. The only good thing I can say - during perfect snow conditions they performed good, but thats it.

I bequeath the set to a friend and he loves them and have them on all of his bikes. Okay he is also much faster than me - may I'm just to slow for these tires :)

Sorry Michelin, we don't get friends...

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 18, 2020, 5:51 a.m.

More sure, the Magi-X struggles in the cold. Like you, I had some terrifying moments. Have you tried it in the summer though? It’s impressive.

Reply

Timer
0
Timer  - Nov. 18, 2020, 7:12 a.m.

Thank you for the review. How was your impression of the tyres’ rolling speed? Saw some measurements indicating that the Enduro Rear rolls very fast for its class.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 Timer
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 18, 2020, 10:54 a.m.

Hey Timer. I can only compare to what I came off. The rear felt good for sure, similar to the DHF I came off but these are also lighter. The fronts were similar to an Assegai, though lighter. The Magi-X is slower than the Gum-X but I found it more reliable until the weather cooled off.

Reply

demo7_rider
+1 AJ Barlas
demo7_rider  - Nov. 18, 2020, 7:14 a.m.

I bought the Front/Gum-X option for a lighter weight winter setup, but puntured on the second ride (the dreaded 'just above the bead' type cut that's pretty much a tyre write-off). Wasn't running an insert since the idea was to save weight, but in hindsight I really should have!

Back to the heavy but bombproof MM SG in Ultra Soft until the spring...

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - Nov. 18, 2020, 7:26 a.m.

I've got a nearly new pair of these that I ran for a few days in September. We never got along. Got a single nearly new Maxxis in EXO+/DD like a DHF2 or DHR2 I'll swap you.

Reply

D_C_
0
DMVancouver  - Nov. 18, 2020, 7:33 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

bernd-brookes-brugger
0
Bernd Brookes Brugger  - Nov. 18, 2020, 8:07 a.m.

Hey AJ, nice review. Similar to my experience. You mention that you tried the GumX Front at the rear, but no word about ride charakteristics. Maybe you can give some addon?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 18, 2020, 11:01 a.m.

Hi Bernd! Personally, the sidewalls were too thin for me in the rear – denting a rim through an insert was enough for me to remove them, which was only a few rides in. The tire didn't perform as well as the rear-specific tire either. It was slower, braking wasn't as good and it wasn't as stable on trails with berms or similar, firmer surfaces where loads get up. In soft dirt, it was pretty sweet though, as you would expect, but I didn't see a huge benefit in the few rides over the rear W.E.

Reply

martyz
0
Marty Zaleski  - Nov. 18, 2020, 9:57 a.m.

I've mounted the Gum-X rear tire and am finding air is weeping out the sidewall, meaning I have to pump up the tire two or three times in a ride. I expect over time the sealant will mitigate that, but it's irritating for now. Did you find the same on your test tires? How common is a weeping sidewall?

Reply

bernd-brookes-brugger
0
Bernd Brookes Brugger  - Nov. 18, 2020, 10:23 a.m.

Afaik this was a problem with the early ones. I‘m on my third pair and haven‘t experienced this with my tires and also neither one of my friends.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 18, 2020, 10:58 a.m.

Hey Marty. I didn't have that issue until the tires had been ridden for a while (shown in the pics). Even then, I could make it through the ride before losing too much pressure, barely. That sounds quite frustrating.

Reply

martyz
0
Marty Zaleski  - Nov. 18, 2020, 1:58 p.m.

Yours look like a leak at the rim bead. I'm talking about weeping through the entire sidewall, so through the rubber itself. Wondering if anyone has experienced this - is it common to these tires, or just a manufacturing defect in particular runs?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:38 a.m.

Hey Marty. There's water from the road (driving to Pemberton) on the wheel and another shot with the pink sealant is about burping. It's pretty clear that in the photo with the sidewalls seeping, the white spots are pushing through the sidewall of the tire. I couldn't get it with the iPhone but there were also bubbles in the white (sealant) as the air seeped through.

Reply

kmag76
0
kmag76  - Nov. 20, 2020, 7:26 a.m.

Hey Marty,

I had the same issue, weeping sidewalls... brought them back to my LBS and had them warrantied.

I had a second set do this as well, but not as bad. I dumped some more sealant in for good measure and they were good to go.

Reply

Mattatto_Mottos
0
Mattatto Stown  - Nov. 18, 2020, 11:06 a.m.

Every Wild Enduro I've run has had weeping sidewalls. My friend's do not. He uses Orange seal and I use a home brew mix. If I add more latex to my mix the weeping stops. I'd suggest picking up some liquid latex from amazon and add to your sauce or change to a different sealant.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:40 a.m.

Interesting. This was Stans, which I haven't used in some time (usually homebrew like you). I'll check with others to see if there's any consistency to this. Thanks for the info!

Reply

andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Nov. 19, 2020, 5:05 p.m.

Same same not Michelins but no issues with Conti Revo sealant less weeping than Stans.

Reply

Hollytron
0
Hollytron  - Nov. 18, 2020, 10:12 a.m.

These are awesome for riding in Oregon as we have lots and lots of soft trail conditions. I have a set of the gumx with cushcore pro and they are awesome. I also like the price!

Reply

qduffy
0
qduffy  - Nov. 18, 2020, 11:49 a.m.

I have a set of these on order just to try them over the winter with the GUM-X tread. I'm a pretty dedicated Maxxis DHF/DHRII rider, but I figured I'd spend a season or two just checking out some variety - the spice of life as they say. These Michelins range anywhere from $20-50 less than Maxxis if you buy local and for that price it's not too hard to swallow if they suck. I'd also like to try some WTB and perhaps some of other Maxxises (Maxxisi? ) like the Assegais and Dissectors. Maybe I'll end up back on the DHF/DHRII or maybe I'll find a new favourite.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Nov. 19, 2020, 5:11 p.m.

Yes except they don't make the Dissector in a DD Maxxgrip which would make sense (never going to run MaxxTerra as it isn't grippy enough) and a good rear tyre to go with an Assegai front

Reply

Timer
0
Timer  - Nov. 20, 2020, 12:26 a.m.

I always thought the Dissector was designed as a fast-rolling alternative to the DHR2. But Maxxgrip rubber rolls so slowly, no matter the thread, there doesn't seem to be much point to making that combination. I know they do one in DH-casing, but the same issue remains.

Reply

dogboy
0
Dogboy  - Nov. 21, 2020, 8:30 a.m.

Might as well run a DH casing since the weight difference would likely be only 75 grams or so.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 AJ Barlas
Andy Eunson  - Nov. 18, 2020, 2:12 p.m.

I’m running the 27.5 X 2.6 on my hardtail. There is less of a tread pattern difference with the fatter tires than with the 2.4 which I’ve used with success in the past. I like that I can get them cheap from CRC. No one seems to stock them here in Whistler so I’m happy to order them in myself. The other thing I like is that they are frickin straight unlike a number of Maxxis tires I have had.

Reply

Shackleton
+2 Andy Eunson Tremeer023
Shackleton  - Nov. 18, 2020, 2:34 p.m.

I have been riding these tyres for 2 years and love them. Can really echo what the review says. One thing I have found is that the profile is much better on 25mm width rims compared to 30mm. The side knob wear is also reduced on a 25mm set up. Maybe not surprising given that they predate widespread wide rim use at EWS level. Hopefully they will update to reflect wider rims being used these days.

For weeping tyres the best thing I have found is to liberally apply isopropyl alcohol to the inside of the tyre and wipe out to remove the mould release compound. Do this a few times from bead to bead (on any tyre), let it dry fully before installing and it helps the sealant sick to the tyre and seal pores in the sidewalls (unless you ride continental tyres where there isn't enough sealant in the world).

Reply

Nologo
0
Nologo  - Nov. 18, 2020, 8:33 p.m.

Just installed 2020 baron dry and left it with 50psi for 2 days to stretch before I add sealant and go for a ride. Pressure remained the same. Did the same with Big Betty with identical result.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:43 a.m.

Interesting stuff! Can fully see how a 25mm wide rim would help the profile. Also real interesting about the isopropyl wipe down. I've not heard of that before but haven't had this issue in many years.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Nov. 19, 2020, 5:17 p.m.

I’ve run into a few tire brands where the sealant seems to bead up when you pour it inside. I think I used brake cleaner to wipe it down then it worked. Don’t recall the tire brand either. Initially my new WE tires did not hold air so well but it’s been so long that I’ve had this issue I didn’t think to clean the insides out. Good reminder.

Reply

srodgers84
+1 Pete Roggeman
srodgers84  - Nov. 18, 2020, 3:23 p.m.

I have been on the Gum-X3D combo since September and have really enjoyed them so far. I run CC in the rear more so as an added layer of protection for the expensive carbon rims but support feels similar to EXO+ in the front and DD in the rear with the added CC for me. Similar to you, I have been known to destroy EXO+ tyres in the rear but so far trouble free. I was surprised with how quickly the rear is wearing for you as I currently have about 560km with no real issues to talk about. Most of my riding since September has been in North Van and majority on Fromme since I live so close by. Came off a Assegai / DHRII combo (which I like) and so far have really enjoyed something different than Maxxis for a change. Also, they look pretty sweet and match my bike compared to the awkward yellow everyone is used to :) Would be interested to try the Magi-X compound once things warm up as a summer tread. Thanks for the review and keep them coming!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:47 a.m.

Thanks, srodgers! Interesting how good of a life you've gotten from them. I don't seem alone with the rear wear but maybe it's terrain/conditions based? These did have a hard start to their use with the 6,000+m bike park day and a few other big days in super dry conditions. It definitely plays into it. Do you find you've spent most of your time on loamers or semi-fresh trails on these?

Reply

srodgers84
0
srodgers84  - Nov. 19, 2020, 9:45 a.m.

I would say a mixture of loamers and the typical Seymour/Fromme sanctioned trails (Boogyman, Ladies, Seventh, Severed, Oil Can, etc.) would make up most of those kms. I would say these trails are pretty easy going on tyres in that they are either soft and loamy, smooth and hard packed, or technical and slow going. Some hard riding in the park would change things up I am sure. I won't complain though as I am quite satisfied thus far.

Reply

the-chez
+1 Pete Roggeman
The Chez  - Nov. 18, 2020, 8:38 p.m.

Great review, AJ! I also appreciate a temperature related review. I've found that beyond terrain, rubber compounds can change a lot with temperature changes. It only makes sense and with three compounds (even four!) on tyres these days it can change grip levels, connection angles and reactivity.

Though I've never gotten along with Michelin tyres it's nice to see reviews of brands other than that one. However, it would take a paradigm shift to get me away from the TRS tyres from e13. I just love those. I'm still wanting to try the MoPo someday.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:49 a.m.

Thanks Chez! I ran an OG TRS in the rear, with an insert, for a few weeks recently and it reignited my love for that tire. I wish that never changed and remained an option. Like you, keen to try the Mopo someday too.

Reply

Nologo
0
Nologo  - Nov. 18, 2020, 8:43 p.m.

Have you tried lowering the pressure with magi-x? I had it on the whole last winter and don't remember any sketchy moments on it.  ~18psi (I'm 75kg)

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 19, 2020, 8:50 a.m.

I haven't had any luck running any of these tires even at my usual pressures. The sidewalls are too thin for me to get adequate support and squirm/burp all over the place.

Reply

captainsl0w
+1 momjijimike
captainsl0w  - Nov. 19, 2020, 3:49 a.m.

I got this combo, magi-x front, gum-x rear at the beginning of the season and tried hard to like them. The front was good on natural and soft terrain but on hardpack it transmitted to much trail chatter and felt bouncy. The rear was fast rolling but braking and control on steep trails was nowhere near DHRII I had on previously and I know a lot of people replaced them with something that digs in and actually stops you when you get in that omg moments. Maybe if those center knobs on rear tire were taller and if I was less then 95kg maybe I would get along with them better. I think they would be great choice for super fast and experienced riders but for average rider they are not forgiving as some other tire combinations.

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cheapondirt
0
cheapondirt  - Nov. 21, 2020, 10:28 p.m.

This was my experience (front only in my case). I'm not sure how a tire with such a flexible sidewall can transmit so much chatter but perhaps due to the stiffer contact patch, I was coming home with sore wrists. I sold it. One for the rippers, not the weekend softies like me

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inclag
0
Inclag  - Nov. 20, 2020, 3:01 a.m.

AJ, I can't help but think that your my Canadian spirit animal based on your reviews over the years, observations, and lankiness ;).

Can't say I disagree with a single observation in this review and your cold weather critiques are dead to nuts and in alignment with my experience.  These are a fine to perhaps exceptional tire within certain use conditions and rider skill level.  That being said, I'm ready to move on to DH tires and different treads for my wheels moving forwards since I'm coming to realize that I value robustness above everything else and similar to you although I'm not experiencing flats, re-lacing wheels frequently is a bit frustrating.  I'm keen to try the new Michelin DH 34 & 22's.

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