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First Impressions

Knolly Tyaughton Steel & Titanium Hardtails

Words Deniz Merdano
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Sep 21, 2021
Reading time

Veteran riders of the North Shore cut their teeth on hardtails long before long travel, idler dangling, 62° headangle, carbon beasts roamed the land. The awkward, janky, "dorp to falt" nature of the trails imposed a fight or flight response that only the hardcore could withstand.

I don't blame the "leavers" who decided to have healthier backs and ankles in their old-er ages and picked up golfing instead. But the few that stuck around were rewarded with excellent riding skills that made them some of the fastest women and men in the world on a bike.

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Size Medium Steel Knolly Tyaughton

Nowadays, when I talk about hardtails with new to the sport riders, they respond with a look of utter confusion as though I'm talking about a stiff-legged geriatric dog I rescued . Hardtailing is no longer a right of passage for most riders, instead it's usually a special edition extra curricular activity only a few sign up for. However, it's important to note that hardtails make you a better rider. Period.

Ansel Adams once said. "When you buy a camera, you are a photographer. When you buy a piano, you own a piano." Hardtails are the pianos of the bike world. Simple yet so complex in their operation. Requiring correct approach to both terrain and technique.

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Size Medium for this 5'9" rider

Build Options

NX Eagle

SRAM Guide RE brakes, SDG Tellis dropper, Marzocchi Z1 150mm fork, Oozy Hex 345 wheelset

$4299 CAD


GX EAGLE,

SRAM CODE R brakes, RockShox Reverb dropper, Lyrik Ultimate RC2 150mm fork, Oozy Hex 345 wheelset

$4899 CAD


SHIMANO XT,

XT 4 piston brakes, SDG Tellis dropper, Fox 36 Factory 150mm fork, Industry 9 Enduro S wheelset

$5999 CAD

Frame Only

Tyaughton Steel - $1299

Tyaughton Titanium - $3799

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A familiar frame shape that works well for steel hardtails

Knolly Tyaughton and Ti-aughton Hardtails

Not far from the North Shore, Knolly has been developing a second-look-worthy bike that is meant to be ridden hard. With a wide range of Fork travel allowance, the Tyaughton is highly versatile. You can use any fork within 130 and 180mm while Knolly calls the "intended use" 140-160mm. The Stock builds come with a respectable 150mm travel Fox, Marzocchi, and Rockshox products.

Like the Chilcotin and the Cache, the hard to pronounce Tyaughton is inspired by the adventurous, grizzly bear capital of B.C. Mountain ranges. It is really cool that the Knolly is inspired by the very landscape they are ridden in.

These bikes all come with proper tires. The EXO casing is light and spritely for the DHF, DHR II combo. On the Shore, during winter time, I may try something with beefier sidewalls or inserts front and back for more forgiveness for my old bones.


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Tie-awe-ton is how I say the name. I imagine some ESL peeps like me will struggle.

Knolly Bikes Talks about the Tyaughton (Press Release)

Tyaughton Steel frames use air hardened steel because it can be manipulated before welding and then heat treated to give high strength and durability. Our steel frames are also ED coated to ensure maximum corrosion resistance and painted with tough powder paints for longevity. All our steel tubes are butted so that the walls are thicker where it’s welded and thinner in the middle which reduces weight while ensuring that the tube ends are incredibly strong. This model is designed to be affordable while performing at the highest level possible.

The Taughton Titanium has been created from a dream material. Titanium is light, stiff and long lasting, providing a premium quality ride for discerning riders. With additional features and significant weight savings, the Tyaughton Titanium is the ultimate expression of mountain bike hardtail performance .Tubes are butted so that the walls are thicker where it’s welded and thinner in the middle which reduces weight while ensuring that the tube ends are incredibly strong.

CUSTOM TUBING

The Tyaughton Steel features a frame size specific butted, bent and formed tube set that blends production level repeatability and precision with a craftsmen level of manufacturing.

It features a size specific tube set (small frames don’t get the same tubes as the XL and vice versa) and incorporates many of the titanium frame features including integrated ISCG05 chain guide tabs and a unique head tube.

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Ti-aughton frame is built overseas to Knolly design and specifications

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Tyaughton steel is built alongside the Titanium model and no catalog frames were used

The Tyaughton Titanium features a 100% proprietary Knolly oversized tube set with all frame tubes tapered, butted, bent and formed to the material’s limits. This allows Knolly to achieve subtle Knolly-esque frame design emphasizing stability and compliance. This model also features a unique frame size specific tubeset to ensure riders of all sizes can get the maximum performance gain possible from this material. Large frames get the largest diameter tubeset to compliment larger statured riders, while smaller frames get reduced diameter tube sets to match rider size and weight while providing matching compliance.

Steel and Titanium frames have a unique head tube shape designed to maximize strength to support forks up to 170mm. Tubesets flow into custom CNC machined dropouts, yokes and access ports (Titanium-only) so that stress risers are minimized. Even the included ISCG mount attaches cleanly into a recessed CNC machined pocket on the chainstay yoke.

/Knolly Press Release


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tall headtube on the size medium 110mm for an aggressive front end

More on Geo/Set Up

The Knolly Tyaughton is a product of patience and research rather than a gap filler. Hardtails make the most sense when the geometry complements the intended terrain. The 64.5° headtube angle is on point for the 150mm fork as because that angle only gets steeper with compression. At full bottom out, that is 72°. The Tyaughton has generous reach numbers with my size medium coming in at 468mm at static height and likely around 470 with the fork at sag.

Speaking of sag, I like to set my hardtail forks on the stiffer side. The recommended 80psi for the Fox 36 was on the low end of supportive for faster riding. I ended up at around 86psi and 3 clicks of HSC and planty of LSC to keep the bike from diving at bigger impacts. These are by no means final settings; more fiddling to come.

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Super Boost 157 rearend.. I'm not sure if it was completely necessary, but you may appreciate the wheel stiffness if you ride fast and rough trails

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Zero Stack headset for a tall headtube

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If you are only going to have one boinger on a bike, might as well be very adjustable. An excellent spec Fox 36 Factory with all the dials.

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This crest is an engraved head badge on the Ti frame. Printed for the Steel to reduce costs.

Titanium Exclusive Features

-CNC engraved head tube

-Full Internal dropper post routing with an access hatch on the underside of the down tube

-Brushed finish

-Fully 3D formed seat tube (butted, tapered, bent and formed)

-Oversized tapered top and down tubes

Titanium and Steel Features

-157Trail rear hub spacing

-Custom head tubes

-Proprietary and size specific main triangle tube sets.

-Fully integrated ISCG05 chainguide mounts

-73mm BSA threaded BB

-12 x 157mm rear end with DT Swiss RWS

-Knolly CNC dropouts

-Knolly CNC chainstay yoke

-Dropper post insertion length: 175 Small, 175 - 210mm Medium, Large and X-Large

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At home in the green.. I love the satin red paint

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I swapped the 60mm Stem and Next R bars for a 40mm Deity and Chromag Fubar 31.8 setup

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The SDG Tellis dropper is a solid option and the Chromag Lift saddle was nice to sit on

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I forgot how easy it is to clean steel bikes.

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The perfect winter bike.

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Tyaughton goes! PC: Brayden Rastad

Riding the Tyaughton

My medium bike came with a RaceFace cockpit that I opted to change. The Next R bar is a stiff steering stick and the 60mm stem was a little too long even for my longish arms. I swapped these for a set of 40mm Deity bars and 780mm Chromag Fubars in 31.8 for a more familiar cockpit. Immediately the fit of the bike felt more natural and as close to my Forbidden as possible. The Ty put me in a great position to attack the trail ahead without the worry of missing suspension underneath me.

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Knolly is magical on the corners Photo: Karin Grubb

The direct response of the hardtail on the climbs was a welcome change from the usual bob and sink feeling of long travel bikes. The short rear-end was a delight to pivot around tight uphill switchbacks while the XT drivetrain and brakes are like my favourite icecream; comforting with every scoop. I9 wheels are on every bike in my household and the sound they make is a lullaby to my soul. In terms of frame-mount options, there is a spot for your water bottle holder and that's it. I hoped a frame like this would provide more mounting options for all the things you'd want to carry into the Cholcotins.

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I didn't have to hold back on the Knolly much.. Photo: Karin Grubb

Overall the Ty has been a delight to get to know. I am hoping to receive a Titanium version of this bike for a direct comparison full review in the upcoming months. Keeping the build kit identical, it will be a great experiment to distinguish the subtle differences of the frame materials. Stay tuned for that.

knollybikes.com

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Comments

ackshunW
+11 Metacomet Kenny gubbinalia Deniz Merdano Cr4w kcy4130 Paul Stuart toddball mrbrett Angu58 Martin Carmel IslandLife
ackshunW  - Sept. 21, 2021, 6:17 a.m.

Well I know a hardtail is a hardtail.... always a slight variation on two triangles.......but that BC-heavy origin story....color.....top tube bend.... and even logo placement.....ummmmmmm??

**Edit** forgot to add...geometry....materials.....one-sided yoke....

Reply

Kenny
+7 ackshunW andyf Nologo Alexis Morgan DarioD Timer Lu Kz Martin IslandLife
Kenny  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:22 a.m.

Imitation is the greatest form of flattery maybe? 

I'm  a bit surprised that with their expertise in aluminum, a high end well engineered aluminum hardtail would have had more differentiation from other brands and be more.. "knolly" didn't come about. 

I feel like they're the type of company to highlight that feel is more about construction and design than material. They could offer something lighter than the current steel offerings at a similar price point. Not that this is about weight weenieism,  but just differentiation in the market.

The equivalent rootdowns are cheaper and don't have 157racetrailmegawhatevervoostnobodyhasanysparewheelsfor

Reply

denomerdano
-1 IslandLife JVP Nologo DarioD mrbrett
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:45 a.m.

Nobody wants an a-lame-minuim hardtail.. maybe if it was a dirt jumper. 

Which might be the very reason to take on the challenge and prove that alameminium is still a viable option for non suspension bikes. 

I personally am a big fan of threaded BBs which.the chromag lack for some reason. 

The 157 issue is there but won't be much longer. I imagine chromag will switch to that soon enough..

Reply

Kenny
+3 ackshunW mrbrett Metacomet
Kenny  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9 a.m.

Yeah that's basically what I'm saying, Knolly seems like the type of company to challenge the groupthink on the subject of hardtail frame materials so it seems like a missed opportunity in a way. I mean it's their company so more power to em - they didn't have a hardtail in their lineup and now they do, so mission accomplished.  

Chromag use PF92 on their 29ers, threaded on 650B for the same reason knolly use 157, ironically enough, to improve tire clearance. 

PF92 literally uses a 92mm wide BB shell, so that's 19mm wider than a BSA73, 

That extra width gives them more options in terms of the design of the chainstay yoke to improve tire clearance. 

As super short chainstays go out of fashion both approaches actually start to become irrelevant, but it is what it is. Pick your poison I guess. 

I had a rootdown for a while, it's the only PF frame I've owned. I used a thread-together wheels manufacturing bottom bracket, because I was paranoid about it, and it was solid as hell. Especially in a steel frame it's really a non-issue IMO. At the end of the day, it's a press fit interface in either case because the bearings themselves are press fit. I can see the argument that a threaded interface could have a longer lifespan, but I think especially if you use a thread together BB and/or leave the cups in the frame and just change the bearings on subsequent refreshes, the difference is pretty academic.  I think good machining tolerances are the most important for either platform and I don't think knolly nor chromag tend to have any issues on that front.

Reply

Nologo
+1 Kenny
Nologo  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:20 a.m.

Love steel but I'm with Kenny on this one. "Comfy" aluminum ht is possible and Paradox is the proof. Not sure if Banshee even has in competition in that segment, Chameleon Al perhaps?

Reply

Kenny
+1 Timer
Kenny  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:45 a.m.

Exactly, seems like a paradox competitor would have made more sense brand-identity-wise and would have been more interesting than a chromag competitor.

AJM
+3 ackshunW Timer Kenny
Alexis Morgan  - Sept. 21, 2021, 3:28 p.m.

So agreed with you here. While Steel is the standard, and Ti is always lovely (but pricey), Knolly prides themselves on the Aluminum side of things and I completely agree with your take that there was an option to develop an "engineered high quality aluminum" bike with a threaded BB (and ideally adjustable drop outs and maybe even some additional bolts for bikepacking) that would have separated this bike out from the masses. Feels like Banshee has out-Knolly'd Knolly here, which feels bizarre...Lost opportunity.

Reply

Vikb
0 mrbrett Peter Leeds
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 21, 2021, 5:07 p.m.

I don't see 157mm growing in the HT space in any particularly big way. I have three HTs at the moment two can take 29" x 3" tires with 135mm/148mm hubs the other can take 29 x 2.6" on a 148mm hub.  157mm doesn't add anything that can't be done without it and you basically cut down your potential market.

I love Knolly and would try another FS or HT frame, but I'm not going 157mm and having bikes in my fleet with wheels that are not swappable. All my shreddy MTBs are 29 x 148mm and any new MTB I buy will be 148mm.

Chromag's new 29er MTB has a threaded BB and they note it's because everyone hates PF. I suspect they'll move to threaded BBs. All my HTs have threaded BBs and can fit wide tires.

Reply

Kenny
+1 Vik Banerjee
Kenny  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:07 p.m.

I alluded to it above, PF was to facilitate super short chainstays. Their chainstays are gradually getting longer so seems they are dropping PF as they just don't need it any more. 

2019 PF rootdown had 415mm stays. New bike you mentioned with BSA is 425-440 and latest rootdown is 420.

Reply

UFO
+2 Andrew Major Vik Banerjee
UFO  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:32 p.m.

That's too bad really. My hardtail journey has gone from an og Rootdown, to Rootdown BA, to Primer, to Surface, and now finally a low rent NS Eccentric alu 29 with nice but not too extreme geometry. 

I can't say that the alu rides any more stiff or unforgiving than the Chromags. But I can definitely say I notice the lower weight compared with heavy duty steel. And the frame was $400 shipped to my door from a Canadian retailer/distributor.

Is the alu going to be less durable than steel? Maybe for some, in the long run. But I ride a hardtail because I HAVE to ride it differently than an FS bike, and in doing that, I also expect that the bike doesn't weigh the same as a 130-150mm FS trail bike.

Reply

monsieurgage
0
Gage Wright  - Sept. 22, 2021, 8:57 a.m.

Dear Deniz, Ima blow your mind man. Threaded. Bottom. Bracket. 73mm.

https://ca.chromagbikes.com/products/stylus-2021

Also the bike is amazing in every way.  I have cleaned pretty much everything sanctioned on the shore on this thing, went dirt jumping, and the whistler triple crown on it.  I can't speak highly enough of the bike and the company that got me one when I had snapped a frame in the pandemic and I was desperate for something to ride Feb 2021.

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:19 a.m.

Amazing bike! 

Second preferred wheel size. Have you thought about a 29" wheel up front?

Reply

monsieurgage
0
Gage Wright  - Sept. 24, 2021, 10:04 a.m.

That would instantly double my tire budget and I am already turning into the LBS trash goblin asking for used but still ridable rubber.  

The bike is a plus 1 and serves as the bikepacking-DJ-light trail day duty.  If you have a DJ then go 29er but for me the style and feel of 27.5 works.

I did overfork it a bit (160->170 travel) when I carried over a fork from another bike (lyric from my patrol) to this bike.  What ever hardtail you get I can't overstate the difference a stiff fork makes.  The hardtail is unforgiving enough without a fork flexing under you.

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 24, 2021, 12:48 p.m.

Fair argument about a cross discipline hardtail. A 27.5 stylus would make a great jump, pump track bike..

kcy4130
+2 Andy Eunson mrbrett
kcy4130  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:43 a.m.

I scrolled through just looking at the pictures, was half way down before I realized it was knolly.

Reply

craw
+5 Deniz Merdano ackshunW Andy Eunson mrbrett Nologo
Cr4w  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:51 a.m.

It seems like there were plenty of opportunities to make it uniquely Knolly. And yet here we are. Luckily they stuck with the one thing that is uniquely Knolly: same length rear center for all sizes.

Reply

xy9ine
+7 Andy Eunson Cr4w Cooper Quinn mrbrett Andrew Major Timer Deniz Merdano
Perry Schebel  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:30 a.m.

was about to say. size specific tubesets, but not rear centers? why is this so difficult?

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 22, 2021, 7:29 a.m.

I'd like sliders for SS setup which as a bonus would allow CS adjustment and if they are interested could also offer 148mm hub compatibility. Seems like that could be a win on all sides.

Reply

Kenny
+2 Cr4w Deniz Merdano
Kenny  - Sept. 22, 2021, 8:17 a.m.

Not sure if you're describing the surface voyager intentionally or not, but man, it looks so sweet. 

Major bike lust on that one, I love everything about it. 

Great geo. Locally made, bomber looking sliders, gear mounts,  and love that they've kept the straight top tube. I realize standover is a thing, but from a gear storage and aesthetic standpoint I'll take straight tubes every time.

Reply

Captain-Snappy
+1 Deniz Merdano IslandLife Ride.Doc
Merwinn  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:06 a.m.

Those other HTs have evolved into their current shapes and clearances over time for good reasons... might as well leverage that evolution.

Reply

martin
+3 Cr4w ackshunW Bikeryder85
Martin  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:20 a.m.

I'm sorry that I have to add to this, but it has so many similarities to Chromags and it's coming from Knolly, who recently tried to sue Intense for having a similar seat tube angle/placement to theirs...

Reply

Fat_Tony_NJ
+2 Andy Eunson DarioD
Fat_Tony_NJ  - Sept. 21, 2021, 6:23 a.m.

I know I'm going to get shit for this... but.... Ti for compliance.... steel for compliance...... Given some of the prices we're seeing on really nice LLS hardtails.... is there a place in the game for a carbon Honzo/Doctahawk/Tyaughton/etc... ? 

For context, I'm on new-version aluminum On-One Scandal (STIFF!) with a 140mm fork, and an Ripley as my "big bike" :)

Reply

Vikb
+1 IslandLife
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:01 a.m.

You can make a great bike out of any material. My brain doesn't want a carbon HT though. Steel is great for durability, ride feel and price. 

I'd love to have a Ti HT once before I hang up my knobby tires for good, but the value proposition has always put me off.

I'm not sure what carbon gets me [that I want] vs. a metal HT frame? 

If you don't need a fancy brand a Kona ESD frame is $699 CAD. Kona used to have carbon Honzo options, but I don't see any listed on the website right now.

Reply

mammal
0
Mammal  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:03 a.m.

ESD looks like a great deal. Too bad about the 417 CS across all sizes though. That's micro for the size L and espeically for the XL.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:06 a.m.

I like short CS so to me it's ideal in my size [Large], but opinions vary on the matter. If I was going to change anything on the ESD it would be a slacker STA and longer headtube.

Reply

reini-wagner
+2 Mammal JVP
Reini Wagner  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:31 p.m.

The dropouts are sliders with about 2cm adjustability. so you can increase the CS up to 437

Reply

mammal
0
Mammal  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:33 a.m.

Right you are. I knew they had included sliders in the past, but because they only mention the shortest length in the geo chart (strange) , and no mention in their product description, I thought perhaps the removed that feature. That's actually pretty sweet then, I'd probably run it at 430 for most of my trail riding, but I could still tweak it from there.

Reply

monsieurgage
0
Gage Wright  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:08 a.m.

I find that short CS is less of a bother on a hard tail because you are using a manual, a bunny hoping and generally maneuvering around obstacles rather than plowing and holding onto a dreadnaught of a a bike.  Surf the waves don't bash through them.  Cross over hardtail to dirt jumper is also nice with short CS.

Reply

mammal
0
Mammal  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:33 a.m.

Longer CS is nice for the steeps, both plummeting and climbing.

Reply

monsieurgage
+1 Cr4w
Gage Wright  - Sept. 22, 2021, 9:09 a.m.

We Are One? Where you at?

Reply

4Runner1
+8 boomforeal Deniz Merdano Merwinn JVP Sandy James Oates sk8r DadStillRides Bikeryder85
4Runner1  - Sept. 21, 2021, 6:57 a.m.

My 20 year old self loves riding hardtails. My nearly 50 year old back loves to read about them.

Reply

denomerdano
+4 IslandLife Vik Banerjee Alexis Morgan Karl Fitzpatrick
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:48 a.m.

What was the peanut galleries response to uncle dave?... Go to the gym!!

There is no way i would hardtail my only bike, but as a second bike, yes please..

Signed.. a 40 year-old

Reply

Vikb
+10 Deniz Merdano kcy4130 Mammal Metacomet IslandLife Alexis Morgan goose8 DarioD Karl Fitzpatrick LewisQC
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:53 a.m.

52 here and rode HTs as my only bikes for the last year. These modern HTs are not the same as the ones we rode back in the day when FS was new. I was quite surprised by how well they rode and how little abuse I was taking. Obviously you can't ride them the same way, but I did ride 90% of my usual trails.

My non-scientific observation is that any MTB you put me on I'll ride to about the same level of control [or lack thereof] and abuse. On a FS bike that just happens at a higher speed with poorer line choice.

Reply

mammal
+3 Vik Banerjee Alexis Morgan goose8
Mammal  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:06 a.m.

Yeah, agreed. The abuse on my body is only marginally greater on my hardtail compared to my dually, or even my DH bike. You just ride them differently, and on slightly different trails. 

I'll add larger volume tires and inserts (if you swing that way) to the list of reasons that hard tails can be surprisingly compliant over the long haul, compared to say, a decade ago.

Reply

craw
+8 Vik Banerjee Deniz Merdano 4Runner1 JVP mrbrett Andrew Major Timer DadStillRides
Cr4w  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:51 a.m.

I'm as gym fit as the next guy but there's something about riding a hardtail aggressively that transcends gym fitness especially when it comes to weak points like wrists and ankles.

Reply

cooperquinn
+14 Deniz Merdano kcy4130 Cr4w mrbrett Grif Andrew Major khai cheapondirt goose8 Vik Banerjee Matt Lee Morgan Heater DadStillRides Spencer Nelson
Cooper Quinn  - Sept. 21, 2021, 11:10 a.m.

sounds like someone skips wrist and ankle day at the gym.

Reply

4Runner1
+1 Vik Banerjee
4Runner1  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:20 a.m.

Great if you don’t have history of significant back injury. 

I can’t even ride the pump track anymore…first world problem!

Reply

AJM
+1 Vik Banerjee
Alexis Morgan  - Sept. 21, 2021, 3:31 p.m.

Might be time to explore gravel riding? If the pump track is causing you grief, not sure your back is calling out for MTB of any kind, no matter how much suspension you're running! Treat that back well...back injuries are awful!

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - Sept. 22, 2021, 10:40 a.m.

There's a Knolly for that!

Reply

AJM
0
Alexis Morgan  - Sept. 21, 2021, 3:31 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Sept. 21, 2021, 11:55 p.m.

47 and still love raggin' my HT.

Reply

gdharries
+1 Deniz Merdano
Geof Harries  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7 a.m.

Is "dorp to falt" an actual term people use or is that a spelling mistake?

If it’s the real deal, I’m going to start throwing it out there when the situation presents itself.

Because, dorp!

Reply

ackshunW
+1 Deniz Merdano
ackshunW  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:20 a.m.

I think it’s like, the dorp was so tight, greasy & janky that the letters got mixed up between somebody’s mouth & your ears.

Reply

denomerdano
+3 Merwinn Metacomet Mammal
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:29 a.m.

It is very much a term on the North Shore. It's a tight, janky, impossible, no speed drop with an uphill landing. It's the worst...

Reply

metacomet
+1 Deniz Merdano
Metacomet  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:58 a.m.

It's the next step in the illogical evolution of the ever coveted drop to flat.  The dorp to falt just takes it that much further and helps put to words something that is so completely awkward and harsh that it defies all common convention.  The high jank holy grail.

Reply

mammal
0
Mammal  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:08 a.m.

Yep, very much a Shore/jank thing.

Reply

IslandLife
+2 4Runner1 mrbrett
IslandLife  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:09 a.m.

Think it's probably the original meme?  Didn't it even come out of the NSMB forums in the early 00's?

Reply

4Runner1
0
4Runner1  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:22 a.m.

Wasn’t the term coined by Wheeliedrop?

Reply

UFO
+1 IslandLife
UFO  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:20 p.m.

It was 'dorp to falt' while out riding the 'Friday nigh turbans'

Reply

craw
+2 Deniz Merdano Timer
Cr4w  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:51 a.m.

It's curious that you find the Next R harsh. I came off a SixC which may as well be made out of iron stock and the Next R I find quite compliant. That really highlights how different-sized people can experience handlebars and why some kind of rating system would be really useful since it turns out different-sized people are, you know, different.

Reply

denomerdano
+1 Cr4w
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:21 a.m.

To be honest. I needed to change the stem more than the bars for this medium to work.

I don't have any 35mm bars around the shop. So it was easier to swap both bars and the stem.. 

31.8 alloy bars are infinitely more comfortable for me.. the Bontrager one piece bar being a current exception..

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craw
0
Cr4w  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:53 a.m.

Totally. I switched from a 35mm clamp Next R at full width to the SQLab 30X carbon at 780 but 31.8 and it's way more comfortable flex-wise.

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hongeorge
+1 Timer
hongeorge  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:26 a.m.

The length you cut them to is a factor also

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RAHrider
+1 Vik Banerjee
Reed Holden  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:53 a.m.

What do you all think of the headbadge? Aged 19 years? I love knolly but I don't know if i would have used that slogan as a permanent headbadge. Maybe a more retro styled font of their usual?

They should have come here before making these bikes and we could have told them how they should make their product ;)

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Vikb
+1 Spencer Nelson
Vik Banerjee  - Sept. 22, 2021, 7:34 a.m.

It wouldn't stop me from buying it, but the Ti headbadge does nothing for me. If the size was right I'd be tempted to get a standard Knolly headbadge and glue it over top. Then again I am not a whiskey drinker so I am not the target audience.

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skooks
0
Skooks  - Sept. 22, 2021, 12:40 p.m.

That's how I feel too. I would love to have the ti frame, but not at 3x more $$ than steel. I had a lowish cost target for this project, and the steel Ty hit it nicely.

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SixZeroSixOne
+1 Deniz Merdano
SixZeroSixOne  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:38 a.m.

Can you update the build prices to differentiate the Steel and Ti options? I presume that as the Ti frame is 3x the price of the steel, then there will be different full build prices....

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denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:48 a.m.

I was not given complete Ti prices. 

I just glanced the website now and the 

GX is $6100

XT is $7000

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DaveSmith
+1 Rok Roskar
Dave Smith  - Sept. 21, 2021, 11:09 a.m.

Once upon a time I  designed the top tube typography and downtube logo with my buddy Tim and on screen we would always apply it to a hardtail to see if the aesthetic of the font would hold up without the 4x4 linkage to reinforce the industrial ethos. Nice to see that it does some 10 years later after we sent over the design files.

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morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Sept. 21, 2021, 11:17 a.m.

Where are they manufactured?

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denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 11:53 a.m.

Taiwan

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WalrusRider
0
WalrusRider  - Sept. 21, 2021, 2:59 p.m.

Sweet looking bikes that I'd love to ride. The frames are pretty expensive though. You can get Reynolds 853 frames for less. I'm also not a huge fan of super boost.

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skooks
+2 Deniz Merdano Vik Banerjee
Skooks  - Sept. 21, 2021, 3:01 p.m.

Had my steel Ty for about a month, and it is ridiculously fun. I am right between sizes and I sized down to a small. The bike feels so nimble and sporty compared to my medium Fugitive. It's really fun swapping between bikes. The Ty will handle challenging terrain almost as well as the Fugitive, just slower. It's very confidence inspiring on steeps and more work on chunky trails. The only time I wished I was on the Fugitive was riding Ned's. My ankles and back were not happy with me .

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denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 4:23 p.m.

My second ride on the Ty was on Neds... Ouch....

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andy-eunson
0 Timer Keit
Andy Eunson  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:35 p.m.

I only weigh about 143 these days but I think compliance of frames is mostly in marketing and peoples heads. Compliance is a sum of all components in a bike and tires are the most important aspect by far if not the only aspect. Certainly frame design can come into play but we are talking how much actual frame flex? 0.1 mm? 1.0mm? Until some manufacturer actually tests flex and can express how much a triangulated frame actually moves I call bull shit. Ive had frames made from nearly every material out there. I can’t say I’ve really noticed any real difference. I think often we convince ourselves that the new unobtanium wonder bike we spent a pay check on is far better.

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UFO
+1 Andy Eunson
UFO  - Sept. 21, 2021, 8:38 p.m.

I'm with you on this one. My preferred hardtails have had 27.5 x 2.8/3.0 tires on the back since before mullets were a thing. Any sense of compliance, give, or je ne sais quoi is soaked up there.

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skooks
0
Skooks  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:33 p.m.

Agreed. I can definitely feel the compliance in the 2.6 minion with the insert.  Frame flex? Not so much.

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sverdrup
0
sverdrup  - Sept. 21, 2021, 10:21 p.m.

Have owned a Honzo ESD and a Doctahawk, built up with the same parts. Your statement about compliance being the sum of all parts is correct, but I promise you the frame is a part of that sum, and definitely noticeable for even a small guy like me.

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RAHrider
+3 sverdrup Cr4w DadStillRides
Reed Holden  - Sept. 22, 2021, 1:59 a.m.

Frame flex is less about material and more about tubesets and build. My nicer frames feel stiff without feeling dead. My old Canfield nimble 9 was stiff and dead. My ti honzo was flexy. My lynsky is slightly flexy but stiff enough to handle shore riding and My chromag is the stiffest of the bunch without feeling dead or harsh. All bikes with similar or in some cases, identical parts (moved from one bike to the next). Just take your bars and while sitting on the seat lean the bar side to side like you are cornering. There is a huge difference between frames in terms of stiffness, how that translates to ride quality is definitely affected by the parts build. I don't think of this in terms of vertical compliance as much as an overall ride quality. I would agree that with fat tires, a frame with more flex does not really provide comfort, but there is a definite difference in ride quality.

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Keit
0
Keit  - Sept. 30, 2021, 3:39 a.m.

Actually there is is a huge difference in flex depending on geo, materials, wall thickness, components and the frame plays a crucial part in the construct of a bike.  Especially in combination how vibrations move through the bike and into the rider. There is 0 BS here.

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Useless
+3 Karl Fitzpatrick DadStillRides Mammal
Guy Elliott  - Sept. 21, 2021, 7:38 p.m.

A modern hardcore HT is so capable (in my case a mullet chromag).  I see them (like night riding) as being a trail multiplier (same trail different experience).

Another plus on getting out more on the HT is that going slower is more friendly to my aging trail dog.. at least that’s what I tell myself

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skooks
0
Skooks  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:29 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

skooks
+2 Vik Banerjee DadStillRides
Skooks  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:29 p.m.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CUHEbNtr6sD/?utm_medium=copy_link

Cool shot from tonight's ride. That's a large Ti, small steel, and medium Ti

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denomerdano
+1 Skooks
Deniz Merdano  - Sept. 21, 2021, 9:48 p.m.

Nice crew!

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