OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major
FIRST IMPRESSIONS | TEARDOWN

Introducing the OneUp V3 Dropper Post

Photos Andrew Major
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OneUp V3 Dropper Post

The vast majority of riders think OneUp's V2 dropper post is hunky dory, and in that sense, it's great that any fanfare around this V3 is much a do about, well, not nothing. What we have here is a mature product that's being intelligently updated based on years of customer feedback.

The OneUp V3 Dropper receives a new smoother seal head featuring an SKF seal, new bushings from IGUS - including longer bushings for better support on the 180-240mm models, and the most exciting feature which is a doubling of the number of anti-rotation pins. All this adds up to a post that will be tighter, and smoother, for longer.

The other big change is a significant weight savings of 60-70 grams between V2 and V3. That 60-70 grams comes at a cost of about one Canuck-buck per gram as the SRP grows from 300 CAD for a V2 post to 360 CAD for a V3. Neither option includes their excellent V3 remote.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major

Double the keyways, 60-70 grams less weight, a new all-aluminum cartridge, and the same lightning-fast teardown time.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (2)

Externally, my 180mm V2 and this 180mm V3, both lowered to 170mm travel, look like the same, very good, mature product.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (3)

Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Squamish anymore. Removing the saddle clamps reveals the first real clue that V3 is not just a V2 with a fresh finish.

The weight savings are made possible in part by a new cartridge. Gram reduction aside, I suspect this new, fully recyclable, cartridge will be polarizing to existing V2 owners. The key difference is that the new unit is a charged and sealed product so it no longer has a valve to adjust air pressure. Its action is noticably smoother than the previous generation, but the return speed is preset.

For the folks I know that forget to recharge their posts, a quick and easy job that requires the removal of the saddle and a shock pump, this change removes that saggy seat post frustration. Either the cartridge holds you up solidly, or it's due for a replacement.

For those who never service their posts, this means that you can't 'fix' a post that's not fully returning by just adding another 50psi. Or adding 100psi. Or texting "Hi, Andrew, can I borrow your super-high-pressure shock pump because my OneUp post isn't returning to the top and I can't put any more air into it with my shock pump?" The answer is no. Lube your dropper post. It will take five minutes.

OneUp V3 vs V2 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major

OneUp V2 dropper post. 30.9x180mm lowered to 170mm travel.

OneUp V3 vs V2 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (2)

OneUp V3 dropper post. 30.9x180mm lowered to 170mm travel.

OneUp V3 vs V2 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (3)

The new, all-aluminum, OneUp V3 cartridge. It's smoother, but not adjustable.

On that note, while the posts look very similar there is almost no inter-compatibility between V2 and V3. This comes down to the dimensions of the previous air cartridge compared to the new nitrogen-charged unit. There are only a few parts that can be moved forward from a V2 post to a V3, including the upper saddle clamp and saddle-clamp hardware.

One thing that's nice to see is that OneUp has committed to providing service parts for the V2 dropper post for at least five years from the release of V3. There are a lot of V2 posts on the market that have only recently been sold, and not every company is diligent in looking after riders who've supported them by buying a previous-generation product.

There will also be a new V2.1 seal head available soon that provides the benefits of the new SKF version to current V2 dropper post owners. The new V3 seal head is not backwards compatible.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post WTB Volt NSMB Andrew Major

I love that mountain biking is at the point that many of the 'new releases' are carefully considered updates to mature products, like this WTB Volt saddle. Or interesting adaptations of prior art, like this Pembree seat collar.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post WTB Volt NSMB Andrew Major (2)

With V3, OneUp aims to deliver a high-value product that rides between truly budget droppers and more expensive fully serviceable, and super-smooth posts like the BikeYoke Revive and WTC Resolve.

The return speed on the new V3 post feels good, to me. But, I've only ridden a 180mm post that's been lowered to 170mm travel so I can't comment on how long it takes for a 240mm post to climb back up to the top. Even with the fixed return speed being good, as a rider, I'm lamenting the ability to adjust the return speed myself. As a mechanic, I'm hoping it will mean fewer underinflated posts and more frequent service for folks who currently just add more air.

Cam has a longer version of the V3, and he will also be writing about the new OneUp dropper, so please look to him for more information on the return speed of the longer unit. As an aside, I do have to laugh a bit that the difference in travel - 170mm vs. 240mm - between my post and some of my friends' posts is the same as the total travel on the first dropper post I ever rode.

On that note, the posts are lowered as before by adding travel shims. This can easily be accomplished on the bike with only loosening the seal head by hand required.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (5)

Well lubricated out of the box. The feature I'm most excited about is the doubling of keyways.

OneUp V3 Dropper Post Teardown NSMB Andrew Major (4)

That said, the V3 is smoother enough that I'm also looking forward to trying the new SKF seal head in my V2 post.

I've been riding the new V3 post for a few weeks now. The setup was identically easy to V2, less having to pump up the post out of the box, and the action is certainly smoother and quieter compared to even a brand new V2 post. Would I buy a V3 post for 365 CAD versus a V2 post currently on sale for 240 CAD? I'll save that conclusion for a future follow-up. In the meantime here are some specs straight from the good folks in Squamish:

  • Warranty: 2 Years
  • Routing: Internal
  • Diameter: 30.9 / 31.6 / 34.9
  • Travel: 90mm / 120mm / 150mm / 180mm / 210mm / 240mm
  • Weight: 325g / 370g / 415g / 460g / 515g / 585g (all 30.9). That's 238g lighter than a Reverb AXS, 155g lighter than a Transfer, and up to 60g lighter than the 2-position Transfer SL.
  • Total Length: 295mm / 350mm / 415mm / 480mm / 545mm / 610mm
  • Compressed Stack Height: 30mm (25mm for 34.9)
  • Price: $269.99 USD / $364.99 CAD / €299.99 EU / £289.99 UK
AndrewMajor
Andrew Major

Height - Steve Buscemi-ish

Wait - Patiently

Ape Index - T-Rex

Age - The same as DOS

Favourite Trail(s) every week - Pipeline (thank you Ken!) to Lower Crippler (thank you Andy!)

Favourite Song(s) this week - I'm Your Man. Nick Cave (covering Leonard Cohen)

Favourite Colour - Cosmic Lilac

Bar Width - It depends

Reach & Stack & ETT - It depends

Crank Length - 175mm except when it's 170mm

Wheel Size - Hot For Mullets

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major

Height - Steve Buscemi-ish

Wait - Patiently

Ape Index - T-Rex

Age - The same as DOS

Favourite Trail(s) every week - Pipeline (thank you Ken!) to Lower Crippler (thank you Andy!)

Favourite Song(s) this week - I'm Your Man. Nick Cave (covering Leonard Cohen)

Favourite Colour - Cosmic Lilac

Bar Width - It depends

Reach & Stack & ETT - It depends

Crank Length - 175mm except when it's 170mm

Wheel Size - Hot For Mullets

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major

Height - Steve Buscemi-ish

Wait - Patiently

Ape Index - T-Rex

Age - The same as DOS

Favourite Trail(s) every week - Pipeline (thank you Ken!) to Lower Crippler (thank you Andy!)

Favourite Song(s) this week - I'm Your Man. Nick Cave (covering Leonard Cohen)

Favourite Colour - Cosmic Lilac

Bar Width - It depends

Reach & Stack & ETT - It depends

Crank Length - 175mm except when it's 170mm

Wheel Size - Hot For Mullets

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Comments

sweaman2
+7 OldManBike Andrew Major Cam McRae BarryW Timer bushtrucker dodobob

One nice thing about the v2 was being able to reduce the air pressure for kids. Suspect that my 10 year old wouldn't be able to get the v3 to compress. Edge case for sure though.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+7 finbarr IslandLife bushtrucker bishopsmike dodobob Dan lennskii

The V3 requires less effort to compress. Does it require less effort than a 120mm V2 @ 1/2 recommend pressure on my kid’s bike? Not sure how I’ll test that but it’s a great question. 

Buying for my kid today, the discounted V2 post with a V3 remote is what I’d buy anyway. But for the future it’s a great point.

Reply

Vikb
+6 Alex D oneupcomponents Andrew Major Skooks Andy Eunson Dan

Late to the party, but figured I'd throw up a comment with another owner's perspective in case anyone was reading this deep into the comment section and was considering One Up droppers.

I've used quite a few different brands over the years. We currently have Bike Yoke, 9point8, One Up and PNW droppers in the garage. The One Up droppers just work. They don't do anything special. The bikes they are in have lots of room so short length isn't a benefit. The BY dropper "feels" the nicest, but the One Up droppers have never let me down and on the trail I can't feel any difference at the saddle.

I can get One Up droppers at a good price through my LBS so most likely I'll end up with a V3 at some point. I expect it won't amaze/dazzle me, but it also won't disappoint. 

I'm a lazy mechanic. Not so lazy I won't clean/lube a dropper or add air [if that's possible], but lazy enough I don't want to tear apart a cartridge if the design is robust enough to last 2-3 years under my butt and the old cartridge can be recycled easily.

Reply

alexdi
+3 Andrew Major Vik Banerjee Skooks

The One Up droppers just work. They don't do anything special. The bikes they are in have lots of room so short length isn't a benefit. The BY dropper "feels" the nicest, but the One Up droppers have never let me down and on the travel I can't feel any difference at the saddle.

This is also my experience. My V2 isn't quite as smooth or low-effort-actuation as my Revive 1.0, but it doesn't detract from my riding experience and it's been just as reliable. I do lubricate it every third ride with Slickoleum on the stanchion. The Revive needs less lubrication, but does require periodic resets with the way I vertically hang my bikes. I'm happy with both. Ultimately the 210mm V2 is on the bike because the 213mm BY was a bit too long. Being a weight-weenie at heart, the V3 is very high in the running for my next dropper.

Reply

Roxtar
+3 Andrew Major Joseph Crabtree Suns_PSD

Andrew, I have a question. One issue I had with the V2 post was with the cable housing ferrule pocket (don't know what it is actually called-the part that holds the cable housing in place). It was very shallow; noticeably more shallow than any other ferrule pockets I've seen. As such, the cable had to be perfectly adjusted as any looseness would allow the cable to escape this pocket. This was a real problem with my wife's Juliana because it had a tight cable bend which put side pressure on the cable, exacerbating this issue. I had to switch her to a different brand.

Can you tell me if this pocket is still shallow or looks to be a normal depth?

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AndrewMajor
+2 bushtrucker Dan

The pocket is still very shallow. Part of the every-mm-counts philosophy. Interesting though as I’ve put a lot of these into bikes without the issue you describe. But I could see how on my wife’s bike where the actuator sits practically on the cable exit point that it could be an issue (extreme angle) as it already is with other posts with more cable end overlap. 

I’d be tempted to get an aluminum cable end (slightly too big OD for the OneUp actuator) and file it down until it just squeezes into the actuator.

Reply

tmb1956
+2 Andrew Major bushtrucker

That is a great idea, filing an aluminum cable end.   Thanks.  

I’ve had similar issues to roxtar, using an 210 v2 shimmed down to 190, on a size small knolly.

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AndrewMajor
+3 bushtrucker Mbcracken Dan

Cheers,

If you want to get really fancy and have fancy friends, then someone has some Nokon cable ferrules in a drawer somewhere. The bend you can make with Nokon is so much tighter that even 4-5 pieces spliced between the post and main cable housing would make a massive difference. 

I haven't tracked down a friend who (admits) they still have some kicking around so it's not something I've experimented with yet.

Reply

oneupcomponents
+4 Justin White Karl Fitzpatrick Dan lennskii

Have you checked the aluminum ferrule on the V3?  We opened the diameter up a bit to accept these.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Dan

I haven’t yet, I just swapped posts across with the same (nice & super smooth) cable/housing setup (gliding on Dumonde Freehub oil). 

I prefer to use WheelsMFG cable ends, so I will certainly check out fitment as part of my review. Cool detail.

Roxtar
0

I think the "every mm counts" thing is of more use to the marketing dept than real world necessity.

That seems like a very poor tradeoff when it negatively effects usability. We're talking an extra 1/8" of overall length to insure it works properly?

I mean, I wouldn't notice an 1/8" of difference in my seat height.

That tradeoff negatively effected two people on this thread alone. How many more out there?

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AndrewMajor
+1 cheapondirt

Presumably you folks went OneUp for your wife to absolutely maximize the drop she could get?

.

I’ve installed a fair few OneUp posts for riders over the past few years and it’s crazy how many centimetres of extra drop some riders can get on some bikes by having the short insertion, short stack, and drop clamp. It all adds up. And even then the difference of 1cm of drop can come down to a few mm of clearance (before being forced into a shorter drop post).

For my height and drop preference (170-175mm) it’s rare that any dropper post and frame combination doesn’t work for me. I can buy a post based on other considerations. But the struggle is real for shorter riders. 

And, here where it’s steep and technical, the difference of a couple centimetres of bike-body separation means a boost in confidence, control, and fun.

———

This concludes my opening statement on why Giant Bicycles should buy a OneUp post for every single person who has ever thrown down money for a Liv full suspension bike.

Reply

Morox
+2 Andrew Major lennskii

I have to agree with Andrew here, the "every mm counts" philosophy is why OneUp has been the most appealing option to this rider since they became available. The limited seatpost insertion depth of my V3 Banshee Rune has been the only negative of an otherwise amazing bike. It made it so I had to ride steep DH with a seat that was too high for comfort. OneUp dropper fixed that problem for me. I think a lot of other frames unfortunately suffer from this issue so my guess is that's driving a lot of people to look to OneUp.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
+1 Andrew Major

I bought a OneUp V2 for my wife's fat bike, to replace a Fox Transfer, because the seat tube to saddle top distance was too long when we changed to a more comforatable saddle for her (SQ-Lab 610 Active - which has a really low stack height to a Specialized Mirror - which I would not say is a bulky/ high saddle). Exactly as you say, switching to OneUp is an easy (and not too expensive especially as it was easy to sell the Transfer post) way to gain 10-15 mm of fit room.

Reply

davetolnai
0

This is exactly my experience.  I mounted one on my wife's bike and I struggle to get it to seat properly.  Yes, the low stack is nice, but I'd take a few mm less drop if it didn't have this issue.

Reply

sacki
+3 Andrew Major Tjaard Breeuwer Joseph Crabtree bishopsmike dave_f oneupcomponents catlikereflexes

I very much like this question. Did you also post this question on PB? I saw this question there, too.
I can only assuem it's for the reasons Andrew mentioned: The "every-millimeter-counts" philosphy.
It's easy to shave off length there. But there are good reasons for why to not undercut the insertion depth under a minimum.
Also, the rotating foot that we have. A threaded into the lower tube actuator will save length, but you won't be able to get the foot out of the way.
On my Banshee Phantom anbd my Spot Mayhem I was able to rotate the foot out of the way (one-sided obstacles) in the seattube to get 15-20mm extra insertion to fit a 185 in the Banshee, respectively a shimmed down 200mm REVIVE into the Spot.
with a foot that is threaded, you will have to live with the orientation as it is.
There are trade offs for almost everything. You need to decide what is important for you as a manufacturer.
For us it is usually function and reliability first, when it comes to a dropper that is designed for the use in some so many different types of bikes. Then we can talk about lenghts and weights.
Fpr optehrs it's to makle the shortest dropper on the planet.
Both philosophies come with trade offs.

Reply

sethg
0

RE: Actuator orientation, was recently looking into V2 (among other options) and came across this on their site: 

"The orientation of the actuator is dependant on the threads in the lower tube. This means the actuator orientation, once tightened up, is arbitrary and different on every post. The actuator orientation cannot be changed without rotating the lower tube on the guide pins."

I was surprised that the orientation is arbitrary - that seems like a simple aspect that could be easily controlled in production for consistency of product, and recognizing orientation-specific constraints in various seat tubes.  However the last sentence makes it sound like it COULD be adjusted to some extent, although I am not sure how intensive or tunable that process would be.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 sethg

I imagine the OneUp note is more about managing aesthetic expectations. I don’t see how rotating their actuator would create much more clearance. Maybe a mm or two would be possible, so I guess that’s valid with the every-mm-counts philosophy. 

It’s certainly been my experience that it’s possible to squeak out a bit more, and occasionally notably more insertion depth on some frames by rotating the BikeYoke actuator. But it’s much longer.

Reply

sethg
+1 Andrew Major

Makes sense, and agree that looks like not much clearance to be gained due to the short length of actuator.

Reply

sacki
-1 Andrew Major oneupcomponents catlikereflexes

In the case of OneUp it typically does not really help a lot, since their actuator is already very short. I'm just saying that comparing overall length to overall length is not always apples to apples.

andrewbikeguide
0

On a small or medium, and usually a hard tail, when clearances are close/ tight, the actuator angle can mean the difference between interference from the bottle boss inside the seat tube or not. You have fitted enough droppers/ frames to have seen that sometimes it is a case of 1-3 mm between working and not working.

Also the fixed/ randomn position doesn't seem like much until one is managing a rental fleet. The variation to get best rider fit, even within the same frame size, means that the bike has to be built with a bit more cable than one would normally fit on a personal bike. The lack of a deep pocket means the chance of the cable head popping loose during the movement of the seat post to get ideal fit, can be a right PITA. Posts that require close attention to the cable tension (not sure how affected the V3 is because it has just released) are also a trickier proposition.

As crazy as it seems, given the per unit price, the Reverb AXS is the ideal dropper for a (high end) rental fleet. No cables, can easily set perfect pedalling height, rentals are usually short duration so battery life is not an issue and if there is an issue it is a matter of two minutes to swap in a different post (and EC if required) and pair it.

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AndrewMajor
0

I don’t know, Reverb AXS is lon. It’s more easily stolen (and more desirable for resale), it’s expensive to purchase and to service. 

The rental shop I do some work for runs V2 posts on everything. Easy to maintain, super quick to travel adjust if required, relatively cheap to replace, and generous with support.

None of their frames had seat tube bosses, but I wouldn’t think twice about removing them as required for dropper clearance.

sacki
+3 Andrew Major Morgan Heater bishopsmike Karl Fitzpatrick ohio oneupcomponents catlikereflexes

No, it can not be controlled during manufacturing or assembly, as long as it's threaded. You could change by 60 degress via taking off the lower tube and reinstall for the next guiding pin keyway

Reply

joseph-crabtree
0

I needed to rotate the actuator about 120 degrees on a OneUp because of cable interference so I put a bit of Loctite on the threads to hold it in place and never have a problem.

Reply

sacki
0

This comment has been removed.

Suns_PSD
0

Those ferule pockets at the bottom of droppers need a pinch screw or something. When you run a long dropper slammed, the cable ends up being short, and it's just total heck to keep that cable inserted during the install process.

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AndrewMajor
0

Or just a housing cable end that fits tighter. On my wife’s bike (XS/S) I may have used my Knipex parallel pliers to encourage the actuator to interface just a bit more positively with the cable housing  end.

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Roxtar
+1 Andrew Major

I found a system that really helps with this. I have a small Irwin trigger clamp (6", I believe) that I clamp onto the inner cable tightly where it exits the cable housing. The rubber snubbers on the clamp hold the cable solidly without damaging anything (smashing the cable). That keeps everything in place while adjusting the post height.

Reply

IslandLife
+3 Cam McRae Konrad bushtrucker

Best part of this, is the V2 now seems to be on permanent sale for $240!  As long as supplies last I guess...

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AndrewMajor
+2 Konrad bushtrucker

100%. V2 is a great post option for most riders and at $240 in Canuck-bucks the value is solid.

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Jankslayer
+3 bushtrucker Joseph Crabtree Jenkins5

Had a V1 and V2 over the years. They were both quickly replaced with BikeYoke. The OneUps were way too sticky and maintenance heavy to be on a daily driver. I ran max PSI and had to clean and re-grease every ride or else the post would get stuck. On paper the OneUp looks great but not if you ride a lot.

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AndrewMajor
+1 bushtrucker

V3 is smoother than V2 out of the box but, as I noted above, it’s not going to convert any BikeYoke aficionados. 

(Price point wise it’s probably fair that this is the case)

Can’t speak to the longer term comparison at this point. I only have about a few rides on V3 as my attention has been focused on the Devinci Chainsaw.

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sacki
0 bishopsmike catlikereflexes

Sad to hear abotu your problems with the OneUp. But very happ to hear that you are happy (well I hope so, you did not mention) with the BikeYokes.

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SiT
0

having both BikeYoke Revive and OneupV2 for some time, can say the Oneup needs more love to keep it working well and even with the Oneup I' m still using it with a BikeYoke lever as it is so much better than the Oneup levers in terms of feel and adjustability. 

Bought my Oneup for a second bike, but only as it was markedly cheaper than buying another BY, but now with the large price increase for OneupV3 would not be such a clear decision in the future.

for me the BY is just the best dropper out there, but still be nice to try a V3, especially in 240mm drop as I'm tall enough to make use of it

Reply

just6979
+1 bishopsmike

"had to clean and re-grease every ride"

Seems quite exceptional. Have you considered it was something else, and not the OneUp posts alone? Maybe a seat tube that was out of spec and thus required too much clamp pressure to hold position? Or perhaps just an example of a bad sample slipping by QC? Especially considering many other people have had many great experiences with v1 & v2

Good that the BikeYokes fixed your problem, perhaps an overall thicker outer tube, or an outer tube with slightly different tolerances, but your OneUp problems seem to be exceptional, not the norm. I would have tried to contact them for assistance.

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Bro-Tato
0

In my experience with the V2, it hasn't been every ride... but it's been quite a bit more than expected. A full maintenance cycle is required every few months to prevent slow return issues for me - and my climate is only wet 4 months out of the year.

I do like to keep my bike clean - maybe these posts don't like that? *shrug*

I joke that they had to make it really easy to work on, because you have to work on it all the time. And I've gotten pretty good at it - takes about 10 minutes total if you don't count all the faffing about getting the goddamn seat post in and out of the bike and reattaching the remote to the bars.

I'm definitely trying out the V3 - if the new seals address this issue for me it will be a perfect product.

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AndrewMajor
+1 lennskii

Since you already own a V2, definitely keep an eye out for the V2.1 seal head that will be sold separately. Potentially the most cost-effective way to get sorted.

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SiT
0

muck def gets into the top of the V2 Oneup (i have a V2.1) far more easily than the top of my BikeYoke Revive

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andrewbikeguide
0

I was also going to ask Jankslayer about his torque wrench for the seat post clamp (and whether or not he is running a 30.9 mm post which generally have the most problems).

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Jankslayer
0

This comment has been removed.

finbarr
+2 Timer Tjaard Breeuwer

Andrew, have you checked with them that the stated total length is correct? Their marketing says that the v3 is 10mm shorter than the v2, but it seems to be either the same length or 5mm longer (looking at, eg, the 210mm version).

Otherwise this looks like a great update to an already great product. Now, if only every company that specs a Reverb could stop and spec a v3 instead…

Edit: In case anyone's curious, OneUp responded on the other site, and said that it should read "up to 10mm shorter." The numbers are correct.

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AndrewMajor
0

I assume it’s based on the best case for a 34.9 post? I didn’t check the numbers, working in the shop installing OneUp posts I consistently find their measurements accurate.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer

The two 30.9 240 drop posts I had (one V2 and one V3) were close to identical in total length but the V3 is slightly shorter. Much of the difference seems to be in the clamp with maybe 1 mm reduction in the lower tube assembly and seal head.

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sacki
+2 Tjaard Breeuwer finbarr Cam McRae bishopsmike oneupcomponents catlikereflexes

Yes, the lengths are correct.
I remember, when we (just to make clear, you may call me biased as I am the owner of BikeYoke and deisgner of our posts) were asked why we didnt make shorter insertions when we introduced our 213. I believe it was either maybe even here or on PB comments, where I explained myself.
I explained that we increased the bushing overlap by 10mm from the 185 to the 213, so the 213mm seemed 10mm too long for what it could have been.
The reason was simply that we have tested and figured that it would not be enough for proper function and reliability for our own standards, if we did not increase the overlap. You will feel noticeable differences between a 185, 160 and 125 REVIVE as all feature the same bushing overlap. The 185 still feels great, but the 160 and 125 will feel much better. So it was clear for us, that for ebnough reasons, we should increase the bushing overlap to ensure proper relaibility and function.
One Up V2 had the same overlap on their 210mm versions as on their shorter drop lengths.
Back then I was already curious how they could achieve this.
So, after all, it may have needed adressing, but that is just an educated guess from my side.
I just can't think of a reason why you would make a proven design longer than it was before.

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generalistg
+2 finbarr DadStillRides

This comment has been removed.

finbarr
0

> I would have to be very desperate or they would have to release a total game changing product to get my hard earned money again.

Why? Have you had a bad experience with PON?

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generalistg
+3 finbarr BarryW Andy Eunson Bikeryder85 Joseph Crabtree

This comment has been removed.

tashi
0

What is “PON?”

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generalistg
-1 Joseph Crabtree

This comment has been removed.

luke_sky
+1 Andrew Major

I feel like I need to clarify that the Volkswagen (VW, Audi, Porsche etc.) involvement of PON is that they are a/the distributeur for the Netherlands, not owning the company.

As a comparison of the sizes and how massive VW is: PON has 16.000 employees while VW AG has roughly 675.000…

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sacki
+4 Andrew Major Joseph Crabtree Suns_PSD shenzhe Karl Fitzpatrick catlikereflexes

Oh, come on. PON owns Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche? Please do your overdue diligence and inform yourself before your post something this. PON owns none of the likes and this is an absolute mad spread of false information.
Apart form that I do agree with you. A lot of major brands belong to the PON Group and OneUp was recently acquired by them.

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cam@nsmb.com
0

I’m glad someone made that a little more clear! An example is, PON is the official importer of Audi into the Netherlands. PON does not own Audi. They have similar relationships with other automotive brands.

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IslandLife
+4 Andrew Major bushtrucker DancingWithMyself bishopsmike

Yep, going through their measurements (and they addressed and confirmed this question in the Pinkbike comments).. the 150mm and less posts, are indeed 5 to 10mm shorter.  The 240 and 180 are the same length as the V2 and the 210 is 5mm LONGER than the V2.

The two charts are here:

V2 - https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0284/9430/files/V3Dropper_WebsiteMeasurementImages.jpg?v=1705363558&_ga=2.170618153.848906429.1705440243-1046296743.1705440243

V3 - https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0284/9430/files/V3Dropper_WebsiteMeasurementImages.jpg?v=1705363558&_ga=2.170618153.848906429.1705440243-1046296743.1705440243

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Tjaardbreeuwer
0

Oh, that’s too bad too hear. I just read the press release, saying they were shorter, and figured that might let my kids get a taller post. Both are on Specialized Stumpjumper Evo’s, wich have short insertion depths.

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AndrewMajor
0

The posts with 150mm or less travel are indeed shorter, how much travel are you hoping for on the Stumpies?

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Jenkins5
+2 BarryW bushtrucker

Interesting new product for sure, but while my V2 was Ok, it required a new cartridge every year and lots of re-lube to keep it going. The weight of this new post is very impressive, but I too would rather not support the PON borg where possible. Lots of other great droppers to fill the void. I'm sure OneUp will sell a ton of these regardless!

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cam@nsmb.com
+2 bushtrucker bishopsmike

I’m interested in what you would go to J55. While I’ve been very happy with Bike Yoke posts (I have a pre-production Revive Max 34.9 with a 225 drop and it’s amazingly smooth and has been bulletproof), I haven’t ridden another that both comes in a drop I prefer (220 is my sweet spot but 210 works fine) and performs as well as OneUp. If you add price that matrix, I can’t think of another I’d choose since the Revive is more than twice the cost of a OneUp at 440 EUR. That’s not even getting into the ease of service and availability of replacement parts and now weight. I’ve heard good things about PNW posts and I put one on a bike for my son, but I haven’t spent time on one myself. 

What are your favoured posts?

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Jenkins5
+3 Andrew Major Clapforcanadaa Cam McRae

I've heard Bike Yoke are the holy grail, but I've never tried one myself. The price is still definitely an issue for me! Ha. My friend's Crankbros has been more reliable than the OneUp, as have 2 of my SDG Tellis and my other friend's YT Postman (which I understand is just a re-branded Tellis). All those are also super easy to service. The OneUp's are definitely the best for insertion and stack, but guess my crew has just had a few dud's. They've been OK, but not as trouble free as the rest of our droppers...This new OneUp looks very nice (we'll see how reliable it is) but is now creeping up in price too. Not the deal it once was....

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AndrewMajor
+1 bishopsmike

Crankbrothers Highline posts get lost in all the noise but they’re my gold standard when I’m testing other posts that use Wintek cartridges going back to the multi-part ‘postricide’ series I did when they first came out. They sit in a funny place in the market - don’t have the most drop, or smallest insertion, or lightest weight, or lowest price but I highly recommend them.

On the other hand, it’s been my experience that those SDG posts are hot garbage. Always disappointing to see one as OE spec on a premium bike (my unsubstantiated theory is that trying to sell NX-level bikes with SDG posts is what killed Guerrilla Gravity). In the shops I’ve worked at we regularly replace them with V2 posts. I assume going forward it’ll be V3 posts instead.

There are trade-offs with every dropper choice and I always point out that they aren’t suspension forks or shocks where the performance really really matters. If they go up and stay up and come down and stay down they’ve fulfilled their purpose. 

———

With the BikeYoke Revive, and I always mention the WTC Resolve in these discussions, the main trade-off is price. The Resolve is very competitive with OneUp in terms of dimensions. The Resolve is taller but for many riders that’s not a concern.

They’re fully rebuildable and lovely to work on. Super reliable. They’re so smooth. All parts are available. And, it’s easy to believe I will own them forever as my desire for dropper travel has maxed out at 170mm-175mm.

Certainly, locally, significantly more OneUp posts are going out the door but I’ve yet to meet anyone who stretched their budget for a BYC or WTCR and was disappointed.

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Jenkins5
+2 Andrew Major Clapforcanadaa

Different strokes for different folks. SDG post have been super reliable for me and my buddies. Never one issue. Definitely not the best but less issues than OneUp fro us. "Hot garbage" seems a bit strong. They just don't got up and donw for you? Seems reviews on them are always strong too. Fake reviews? Maybe.... They seem to be very similar to Crankbros internally (no air adjust) and get spec on a bunch of brands....Guess you can't please all old cranky shop employees all the time!

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AndrewMajor
0

They use a Wintek cartridge like many posts - PNW, Crankbrothers, X-Fusion, Giant, e13, etc. I’ve seen a lot of issues with the SDG posts having premature wear and friction (related to the chassis not the cartridge) and experienced a number of posts that were awful right out of the box. I certainly would defend my assessment as not being hyperbole.

Apparently SDG is working to fix these issues with new, better, product on the horizon.

As you suggest, different folks will have different experiences and as with any product I can only speak to mine. As a general policy I don’t comment on other reviews on NSMB or elsewhere (occasional exceptions occur, particularly writing on my own blog).

There are many factors to consider and environment is one. The Fox Transfer/RaceFace Turbine R posts seem to be victims of this where some locales folks ride them hard and often for years without issues and others places have the opposite result. 

Either way, stoked your SDG post is working for you and I certainly wasn’t meaning to contradict your experience with the product. It’s just near the top of my do not recommend list for dropper posts.

It’s a funny example of ‘that’s mountain biking’ that generally I’m replacing SDG posts with V2 in the shop but you’re replacing V2 with SDG.

Clapforcanadaa
+1 Justin White

SDG chiming in here. Certainly don't want to try and steal any of the attention from the OneUp V3 launch (as it looks like an outstanding product), but had to hop in here with any media outlet referring to our product as "hot garbage". The Tellis is often referred to by media and shops as an absolute workhorse so I certainly am surprised by your comments here. Furthermore, the global failure rate on it (this includes all OEM and AM warranty claims) is less than 0.4% so I'm again surprised by your comments as they're certainly not backed by the hard data we track. It's also part of the reason why leading OEM's continue to increase their spec with us year over year (since dealers tend to not have issues with it, we offer global support and it's a great value item). 

What kind of premature wear are you seeing on the posts? What were the issues with the posts that were "awful" right out of the box? 

If you're interested, we can certainly get you setup with the new version as long as you can approach it with an open mind with your preconceived notions about it being "hot garbage" and being the thing that "killed Guerilla Gravity". The current Tellis has by far the industry's lowest failure rate and has been extremely well received by many for it's simplicity and durability. However there's always improvements to be made on any product and we're stoked to show what we've been up to these last 3 years developing it.

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AndrewMajor
0

Apologies for the delayed response. Your post was in a moderation queue so I hadn't seen it before now (1:30pm PST).

"had to hop in here with any media outlet referring to our product as "hot garbage"

I will note that statements that fall under my byline reflect my opinions and experiences only. In this case, my experiences come from working as a bike mechanic and having built and serviced both Knolly and GG bikes with the SDG Tellis post as OE droppers. 

I have also installed a few Tellis posts that were sold as inexpensive take-offs when someone upgraded to a smoother option from new.  

I also ride with folks who are either in the process of upgrading a stock SDG post, or have previously done so. In terms of statistics, I'd be most interested in knowing what percentage of riders who buy a bike with an SDG Tellis dropper are still riding the post a year later. Again, my experience may be skewed, in this case by how many miles my friends tend to put on their bikes. 

I'd also be interested to know what percentage of your sales are new-in-box after-market vs. OE. 

"Furthermore, the global failure rate on it (this includes all OEM and AM warranty claims) is less than 0.4%"

I've never been involved in a warranty inquiry for an SDG post, so I can't speak to what value that statistic might hold. I've felt enough fresh-out-of-the-box SDG posts and installed enough replacements for SDG dropper post that I'm confident in my assessment. 

Typically in the shops I've worked for, warranty never came up and customers were sold a new dropper post. This could be a North Vancouver phenomenon where folks tend to have more disposable income and just want their bikes to work well. 

Clearly, from the comments here and the feedback you're receiving from riders and test writers, my experiences don't reflect every other rider's experiences. Or, though strange to me, perhaps any other test writer, rider, or mechanics experiences? 

"The current Tellis has by far the industry's lowest failure rate and has been extremely well received by many for it's simplicity and durability."

I would love to know how you calculate that.

"However there's always improvements to be made on any product and we're stoked to show what we've been up to these last 3 years developing it."

So no one presenting your new product to OEs, distributors, and dealers is acknowledging prior performance and durability issues?

"It's also part of the reason why leading OEM's continue to increase their spec with us year over year."

My understanding of the OE dropper post situation is that a number of OEM customers are no longer choosing to spec. OneUp dropper posts due to their affiliation and later purchase by PON and dimensions and price point are key factors in seeking a replacement.

"If you're interested, we can certainly get you setup with the new version as long as you can approach it with an open mind with your preconceived notions."

I wrote an extensive series on the first-generation Crankbrothers Highline Dropper Post despite my many poor experiences with their past dropper posts both as a rider and as someone who's spent most of my adult life working in the bike industry.

https://nsmb.com/articles/crankbrothers-highline-postricide-first-look/

https://nsmb.com/articles/crankbrothers-highline-dropper-follow/

https://nsmb.com/articles/crankbrothers-highline-dropper-windup/

My concern here is that Crankbrothers was beyond open in acknowledging and owning issues with their past products, whereas, apparently, in the case of the Tellis I'm the only one who has had a negative experience, or to have known anyone to have a negative experience.

Clapforcanadaa
0

> Again, my experience may be skewed, in this case by how many miles my friends tend to put on their bikes. 

Anecdotally, one of my riding friends here (Kamloops, BC) put over 3,000km on his Tellis without opening it once. My personal collection has posts from 2017 still completely functional with having only changed their keyways. This isn't isolated as I hear time and time again from customers and end users how their Tellis "simply works" and there's no reason to change it. 

We take great pride in all the effort we put into the developing the Tellis as well as our ability to listen to specific customer feedback to continue elevating the product. We genuinely value the feedback and being an extremely small brand means that we can take this into consideration and insatiate changes. For example, before the Tellis was launched, Norco was testing it and they mentioned that water had gotten in at the actuator through the seat tube. As a result of this feedback, we added two additional internal seals in addition to the main Trelleborg seal and the internal cartridge seal. 

> I've never been involved in a warranty inquiry for an SDG post

This statement seems contrary to the post being "hot garbage". I'd expect you to have a stack of warranty claims for any product capable of bringing a great brand like Guerilla Gravity to it's knees.

Out of the box some posts will feel more resistance than others, but this is standard across any product with moving pieces as variances in tolerances mean that there's an initial wear in period. Furthermore, we use PTFE Keyways instead of copper or brass which allows us to have super tight tolerances and nearly zero head slop. However, this tight tolerance certainly would add to some level of added resistance, but to us the lack of head slop is a worthwhile trade off. 

>  So no one presenting your new product to OEs, distributors, and dealers is acknowledging prior performance and durability issues?

I left the company I previously worked for in the industry because they refused to acknowledge any short comings in their product line. I joined SDG because we're small enough to listen and I'm not thick headed enough to think our product is the absolute best. Every product has a short coming. Durability simply isn't one of our shortcomings and this is based on me personally flying over 100,000 miles a year visiting consumers, dealers and distributors to talk about product. You still haven't really clearly explained what the durability or performance issues are other than you thinking that they have too much stiction out of the box. 

> My understanding of the OE dropper post situation is that a number of OEM customers are no longer choosing to spec. OneUp dropper posts due to their affiliation and later purchase by PON and dimensions and price point are key factors in seeking a replacement.

You're a bit off here. You're telling me we picked up Santa Cruz spec in 2019 because they didn't want to be affiliated with a PON owned brand? The OneUp to PON deal was only recent so while yes, some OE's may make that choice to switch MY24/25 spec due to the PON affiliation, I was referring to all the other years prior to the most recent switch. Every single YT Postman (and Postman V2) post is a Tellis (and V2). Large, multinational brands don't typically switch to using ALL your products for several years simply to not be affiliated with a competitor or for price. There's quite a few solid options out there that they could spec instead of us and for cheaper. Brands like them, Santa Cruz, Devinci, We Are One, Norco, all spec and continue to spec because they have all said the failure rate is so low that there's no reason to change. 

> My concern here is that Crankbrothers was beyond open in acknowledging and owning issues with their past products, whereas, apparently, in the case of the Tellis I'm the only one who has had a negative experience, or to have known anyone to have a negative experience.

My head isn't completely up my ass and I will gladly openly acknowledge any product issues. You haven't clearly outlined what these documented "performance and durability" issues are. Your claims above are all anecdotal, not backed by any kind of data or specific comparable cases other than generalizations about our post not being as smooth as others.

Crankbrothers had well known and documented product issues and it's great they stood up, acknowledged the issues and fixed them. 

A quick google search on "SDG Tellis Reviews" only brings up overwhelmingly positive reviews. The only negative comments on the post are the angle of the clamp hardware and it's generally average stack/overall height.

AndrewMajor
0

@Clapforcanadaa, I do appreciate your reply and your passion for the product. Flying around the world four times a year for your job is a lot, I hope it's an aspect that you enjoy. 

I apologize that I didn't more thoroughly explain the issues that led most folks to change posts. It's a grinding friction from new that's unresolvable through lubrication and becomes worse over time, completely down to the chassis (not a cartridge issue at all). In my experience, riders upgrade them from new or ride them to a point and then purchase a new one and this comes down to a financial decision. I'm not sure how I'd photograph that. 

In terms of wear. Next time I see one with shaft wear though, if you'd like, I can take a photograph and post it.

Regarding warranty claims, I've confirmed I'm not crazy and other shops are also recommending to customers to buy a new post rather than seek a warranty resolution for this and other price-forward OE posts. Again, this may be a North Vancouver phenomenon. I only wrench on, and write about, bikes in a tiny microcosm and recognize that. 

In terms of my evidence being anecdotal, I'm not sure what other sort of "data" I could be expected to bring to this conversation other than my imprints and experiences. I haven't made any claims about the SDG Tellis post that don't come from my experiences riding and wrenching here in North Vancouver, but they're my experiences. I'm always happy to own my opinions. 

I've taken apart, serviced and ridden a fair number of different dropper posts both wrenching in a shop and reviewing product for NSMB.com. Not just high-end options, my list includes the most budget-friendly units from PNW, X-Fusion, and RaceFace. I've done teardown pieces on BikeYoke (Revives and Divine), Wolf Tooth, FSA, e13 (coil & cartridge), PNW, Shimano Pro, OneUp V2 & V3, Reverbs, Crankbrothers Highlines, Bontrager Lines, and maybe that's it. 

I'm stoked that you are seeing so many positive reviews, but that's not going to change my experience of how the current SDG Tellis ranks relative to those other products. And unlike many review experiences, it's not just looking at one example.

sacki
0 Mammal catlikereflexes

I personally know more than a handful of dealers that take off certain products of complete bikes right out of the box before they go to their customs and replace these products with something they know they don't have to expect any troubles with. All of them. Not a single excuse. They take them off and sel them "second hand", never to be seen again. Their experiences with certain products is bad enough to "upgrade" bikes for customers out of their own pockets, just to know the customer us unklikely to come back with to be expected troubles.
for asll thsoe
I am obviously not going to name these "unpopular" products or brands, but it's not SDG, that I will say.
I know even more dealers and customers who do not even bother claiming in for warranty as they just buy something new, either because they know that it's likely to fail again or because they don't wanna bother with the process of going through their dealer and the whole warranty process whcih can sometimes can be really frustrating.
Then, as I am a dropper designer and a generally curious person, I can't help but ask anyone and everyone around me to just try his dropper post. When I am at shows or festivals or dealers or on vacation, in bikeparks, on the trails, the chance is big than you will see me playing with one, whenever there is one around.
It's astonishing how many people ride with defective droppers, and simply don't care or don't even know. Now thast could be because of neglect or because the product is just shitty. But when then talking to customers, it's interesting to hear what they have to say.
Now again, this is not SDG related, but I want to say that warranty rates do not neccessarily reflect what's going on in the world out there. The more affordable and convenient it is to simply replace a product with something supposedly "better", the less likely it is to actually claim it for warranty.
The more expensive, the more likely it is to file for warranty.
That applies for all products on a bike.
Just wante to share my experience of almost 15 years in daily workshop service at a bike manufacturer from 2010-2018 and as the owner of a brand, where I have been working in customer service since I started the company on a basically 24/7/365 basis.

sacki
0 bishopsmike Cam McRae hotlapz oneupcomponents Clapforcanadaa catlikereflexes

Certainly not the Holy Grail. We do have the occasional issue, too.  No doubt. Just looks kinda like these occasional issues are fairly rare. And that makes us very proud.

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AndrewMajor
+4 BarryW bushtrucker Kos Joseph Crabtree

I have heightened small-brand sensibilities, but even then I don’t understand the specific hate for the PON-Stars that I’m seeing right now. Not addressing your post specifically, it seems to be everywhere?!

There are a number of large vertically integrated brands in the bike industry - Trek, Specialized, Giant, etc. They own bike shops and brand components (the former two having bought up many private IBDs) and Trek has a past history of buying other brands (Bontrager, Fisher, Klein, Electra). 

If anything going into a PON shop there’s a greater potential diversity of options since Santa Cruz, Cannondale, and GT bikes are all very different even where they overlap. 

What gives? It’s because they own brands outside the bike industry? 

Don’t get me wrong, I know a couple folks who won’t buy anything from a company that’s owned by a big holdings firm - no Stan’s sealant, no Fox suspension, no more Kona bikes, etc. - but typically they aren’t singling any one brand out, or if they are it’s to single out a brand they are interested in buying from.

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Jenkins5
+2 Andrew Major bishopsmike

Yup, I try not to support Specialized, Trek and Giant either! Now if this new OneUp dropper turns out to be the most trouble free on the market after a few years I may reconsider. It's just a dropper though so I'd rather support smaller brands like PNW, SDG, Wolftooth etc....My biggest issue with the big firms is the extra benefits they offer the brands. More R&D money, group buying power etc. While this is the way capitalism works and ultimately should lower consumer prices, it doesn't seem to always be the case. In PON's case it seems Santa Cruz and Cannondale bikes are more expensive than ever and this new OneUp dropper is up in price too....Again this is the way the world works but I just like supporting smaller brands were I can....OneUp is a fantastic local success story though and I wish them all the luck in the word! I'm sure my weird buying habits won't change their continued success at all!

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AndrewMajor
+1 bishopsmike

That’s legit. Not bike specific, but significant purchasing power often doesn’t seem to translate to better products, after-sale support, or prices. 

I will say that Santa Cruz and OneUp both have, in my experience, excellent after-sale support. But then, so does PNW and they’re a great small brand. 

I always find it affirming that folks are out there me thinking about this stuff - regardless of the purchasing decision they make in the end.

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AndrewMajor
0

In terms of the posts themselves, strictly talking V2, I’ve installed a pile of them over the years and they work great for 90%+ of riders. But folks who ride a lot in adverse conditions seem to report a lot of issues with premature slop, cartridge issues, and friction issues even when lubed and inflated. 

For that 5%+ of the market, assuming you can get the drop you want, you’ll be significantly better served by a Revive or Resolve. Either will be smoother and tighter for longer and are fully serviceable with good small parts support.

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cam@nsmb.com
0

I love BikeYoke as well but 440 EUR works out to about 645 CAD. That will get you 2 V3 posts aside from the tax. The question then becomes if they are twice as good, or if you've had enough problems with a V2 that you would prefer to go to another brand. And that was what I was asking actually; other than BikeYoke, what have riders had good experiences with, or at least better than OneUp?

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AndrewMajor
+2 bushtrucker Joseph Crabtree

My reply was for @Jenkins5, not a response to your comment.

.

To answer your question, it's been my experience that the small minority of folks who do not get along with the V2 dropper have had considerably better performance results from the two other models I listed in my reply above: the BYR & the WTC Resolve.

The actual cost of ownership will depend on many factors including whether a rider is servicing their own post or paying someone else to do it. There are also value considerations for the performance, and performance longevity, of the dropper post. Plus some folks are willing to pay more money for nicely made rebuildable things regardless of any performance differentiation.

.

As far as I'm aware most local shops, including the ones I work with, sell predominantly OneUp dropper posts with generally favourable results.

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joseph-crabtree
+3 Andrew Major bishopsmike orenperets

I've got 2 BYR's and am waiting on a 3rd to replace the V2 on my other bike. The V2 has always needed a lot of attention whereas the BYR's have always been smooth. The oldest BYR is 3 years old and I rebuilt it last fall with great parts availability and info. 

The cartridge style post are easy to fix with a replacement but the waste issue will always bother me. I would rather pay the extra money up front for a quality, rebuildable post and Sacki has personally answered any questions I had about their products.

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BrambleLee
+1 Cam McRae

This comment has been removed.

Timer
+3 Andy Eunson bishopsmike Cam McRae

Vecnum’s Moveloc posts are also very reliable but in CA might be even more expensive than Bikeyoke. 

However, speaking of price: I know a lot of folks, including myself, who are willing to spend a lot of money if it saves on time and hassle. To me, time is much more valuable than money and paying a premium for a totally reliable dropper would be perfectly fine.

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sacki
+4 Joseph Crabtree Andy Eunson Andrew Major bishopsmike Cam McRae Pete Roggeman oneupcomponents catlikereflexes

Neither has a REVIVE half the require drop force, nor does it weigh half of that of a OneUp.
Also, I can't really say that you can go twice as long without a service or get double the bling factor. A post needs to go up and down reliably. If it does that and the drops suits you well, too, then there is no real reason to opt for another one.
But then, there is also no reason to buy a Rolex over a Casio. It won't tell you the time any more precisely than the Casio would.
Companies can have different approaches.
Our approach is that we build 100% of our posts by hand and most importantly, by our own team. It's not made by someone else for us. We have to make sure that every single part of the ~50 parts in a REVIVE is there on time and properly produced so we can build them for the customers as opposed to receiving completely build posts in our warehouse from a manufacturer. That does not neccessarily make the product better or worse, but costs money.
Our approach is to design all the internals to be rebuildable and repairable, with every single part needed to fix a dropper still being available since we introduced our first dropper in 2016. That's something others consider noteworthy and declare it as "sustainable". For us this is simply normal. That costs money.
Our aspproach is to go through a traditional distribution from brand -> distributor ( responsible for country) -> dealer -> end consumer. We think distributors AND dealers are critical for a healthy market for supply and service. No dealer will like to stock all the spare parts one could need. A good distributor will do and he will supply to his dealers quickly. We do not want to cut out anyone. That is why a traditional way of distribution will always require a higher MSRP than direct to dealer.
If customers are willing to suppoort the way we run our company and philosophy, then I think they are happily paying the price for a product and service, that I, unlike others, would not self-declare as "simply, the best", but as an arguably premium product which has proven to stand out other than on paper.

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cam@nsmb.com
+4 bishopsmike sacki Timer Pete Roggeman

Agreed. At least for those who have the extra money to pay that premium for next level engineering and durability. Purchasing bike components following that model will get you into Chris King-level spending quite quickly, which is sustainable for some.

Mountain biking is rapidly becoming a wealthy person’s sport but many participatants have much more modest means, which makes spending an extra $300 prohibitive when tires and brake pads will need replacing with some regularity. For some that extra $300 would mean no tires on the foreseeable future, which could mean leaving the bike hanging on a hook for that  philosophy and small business support. 

We all have to make choices when faced with limited resources and I’m glad we have companies like BikeYoke and OneUp (PON) to help us navigate those decisions

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sacki
+3 bishopsmike Cam McRae Skooks Pete Roggeman catlikereflexes

Yes, true. Since OneUp entered the dropper game, I have considered them as our strongest competitor and one that keeps pushing us. The new OneUp V3 is hard to beat on the paper.

Timer
+3 Andrew Major Cam McRae Karl Fitzpatrick

Keep in mind that a decision between components like OneUp or Bikeyoke posts is certainly a choice at the luxury end of the sport. No one needs any of those to enjoy riding.

AndrewMajor
0

This comment has been removed.

rwalters
+1 Skooks

It's insane to me that someone would rather add air pressure to fix a sticky V2, rather than do a quick clean and re-lube of the internals - a process that requires no tools and takes less time than removing and re-installing the saddle.

I've owned the same V2 for over 4 years, and I'm blown away how well it holds air. Even with the schrader valve, there's no perceptible leak over time. The V3 looks great, although I'll personally miss the ability to fine-tune the return speed, as I prefer a slower return.

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AndrewMajor
+1 bushtrucker

It's insane to me that someone would rather add air pressure to fix a sticky V2

It’s insane to me that folks try to drive in winter conditions on bald ‘all-season’ tires but I have friends who delight in sending me photos when they see such animals (because it drives me nuts) and so I know for certain they’re everywhere all the time.

I regularly see OneUp posts through the shop in a condition that no amount of service will fix, that have max recommended air pressure. I’m only reporting my first hand experience.

.

My personal issues with V2 come down to the comparative longevity of an acceptable level of anti-slop relative to other posts I have more hours on. I anticipate the doubling of key ways will very much help in this regard on V3.

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orenperets
+1 Andrew Major

Andrew, Cam (or anyone else with experience with these models)

If you had to chose between the V3 and the bikeyoke divine, which would it be? 

185mm here.

Smoothness, reliability and longevity counts in my book. obviously the last one is an unknown for the V3 ATM.

thanks

Oren

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AndrewMajor
0

Oren, tell me straight up if this is cheating because I've answered your A-or-B question with C-or-D. 

If I was buying a post today and thinking about min-maxing the out-of-the-box performance vs. price then I'd buy a OneUp V2 on clearout. I'd pick up a pin kit for it to have, and then I'd watch for when the V2.1 seal head becomes available. 

If I was buying a BikeYoke it would be a Revive. I don't have anything against the Divine, but I've ridden a few Revives and worked on several more and it is an excellent product. I know I'll amortize the cost difference over many years. 

.

I'll note that when I'm doing the math on the Revive dropper, I'm doing all of my own service. 

I get that vast majority of riders who are buying a BikeYoke Revive dropper, or a bike that comes equipped with a BRY dropper aren't living tight to the extent that the service cost of a dropper post is a factor they're budgeting, they just want the smoothest and most reliable option. But, I think it's worth noting all the same.

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orenperets
0

not (necessarily) cheating.

I'll read your post as "if money is a concern, chose V2 oneup. best value/performance. if not (or less), jump to the revive".

i will probably try servicing it myself, up to the full service (and maybe later, including).

what if i throw in the resolve?

thanks

Oren

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AndrewMajor
0

The Resolve is fantastic. It's the smoothest and tightest post I've ridden over an extended period of time even compared to the Revive, it's competitive with OneUp in terms of insertion and stack (for those for who it's a concern) and it's the least affected by cold temperatures on the market.

The potential negatives are the cost (it's a premium product) and some folks really don't like how affirmatively it tops out and bottoms out. 

I've torn down the Resolve a few times to change travel and while they have excellent service documentation the process is not as straightforward as the Revive. Actually, for the home tech who wants to tackle their own service the Revive may seem complicated but they're really easy to work on.

The Revive requires no proprietary tools / the Resolve includes the only proprietary tool you need. 

And I mean, how's that for a non-answer? 

I really like the rail system (wings) of the Resolve and I only ride metal-railed saddles so compatibility isn't a concern for me. The self-reset function works as advertised. 

I really like how quick and easy it is to service the Revive and the Revive function works great. 

They both cost ~ the same amount of money. So if you can afford either it's a nice decision to have to make. I've run lighter weight oil in the Revive to improve cold weather performance, so the only obvious place that the Resolve is the winner is if you need the shorter insertion depth and stack height. 

HAHAHA. I do hope that's a bit helpful?

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AndrewMajor
0

I'll also note, that in terms of the budget-friendliest options, assuming a 170mm post works for you (190mm for 34.9) I still love the X-Fusion Manic. Wintek cartridge, metal actuator with good spring tension, includes a very decent remote in the price!

200 USD | 280 CAD including an okay remote (I'd be upgrading the remote as I'm very particular about touch points, but it's certainly usable). 

.

It's also a superior OE option and I love to see it coming with bikes - for example Rocky Mountain uses it on several models as their house-branded "Toonie Dropper" and I've bought an almost-new take-off (used buy-&-sell / no warranty) for $50 as part of a project I'm working on. 

If I was half the dirtbag mountain biker I pretend to be, and given 170mm works great for me on most bikes, I'd be shimming those into everything.

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orenperets
0

trying min-maxing but looking at long term and sustainability, how about a BY divine, new, for 240$? (revive is 310$ but out of stock.) 

it has the 6 pins, shares components with the revive, and i can get the 185 drop.

This is vs WT resolve (200mm) for around 300$.

I'll be using a WT pro remote;

I am planning on my own maintenance, the WT seems a bit more intimidating.

Divine ~290$ , resolve ~360$, Oneup v3 310$ (all with remote & adaptor).

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cxfahrer
0

Does it resemble the Kitsuma then, as the V2 did also have the near identical cartridge as the TranzX? 

My next dropper has to be 240 or more, and as I don't worry about stack or insertion I would like to have less sloppiness than my V2 210s. Easy rebuilt but frequent rebuild.

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AndrewMajor
+2 bushtrucker Tjaard Breeuwer

Double the anti-rotation pins should significantly cut down on slop or at least the time until thicker pins are required. But truly that’s a time will tell question.

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morgan-heater
0

My one-up post is tall, and fits, which is great. It also goes up and down, which is great. But it is creaky and it wiggled, out of the box, less great. More/longer key ways will probably help, but I think it's partly the manufacturing tolerance. My PNW post has a bit longer stack height, but I really appreciate the lack of clicking and wiggling.

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AndrewMajor
+1 DancingWithMyself

Have you tried the thicker pin set on your V2?

I also see the odd one that needs seal head lube out of the box. 

The beefed up anti-rotation set up on V3 should make a difference.

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morgan-heater
+1 Andrew Major

No, I figured I'd wait till it needed a rebuild to mess around with the pins, etc. I think it actually came with a second set of pins, but I never thought to check to see if they're the thicker ones.

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AndrewMajor
0

Included with the post would be the travel adjusters. But they do sell one bigger size of pins and it makes a big difference on a worn post (I haven’t experienced excessive play from new and I’ve put a lot of V2 posts into bikes).

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just6979
0

The V2 oversize pin kit comes with 2 larger sizes, 6 pins total: +0.02mm and +0.04mm IIRC.

I wonder if the v3 will get the same, or perhaps the (relatively soft and slippery) polymer pins are "oversized" to do the work of reducing slop and the brass pins are now to limit max movement so the polymer pins don't get chewed up.

Which brings up something about the v3: is the number of pins really doubled if 2/3rds of the extra pins are not the same? It really added 33% more brass and 2x polymer pins.

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AndrewMajor
+1 sacki

Which brings up something about the v3: is the number of pins really doubled if 2/3rds of the extra pins are not the same? It really added 33% more brass and 2x polymer pins.

I don’t know, does it matter? I must be getting tired and jaded about writing about bikes because I had about 99 questions about the V3 and this wasn’t one.

AndrewMajor
0

The V2 oversize pin kit comes with 2 larger sizes, 6 pins total: +0.02mm and +0.04mm IIRC.“ 

Yes, thanks for the correction.

.

*edit: @Justin’s link below.

just6979
-1 Spencer Nelson

Yes, it kind of does matter. If they just say "double the pins", it implies double the same kind of pins doing the same thing, which implies twice as strong/durable/whatever.

I'd think the polymer pins being present at all is more important than the "doubling". Why add them if they're not doing something different/extra vs the brass pins, otherwise there would just be 6 brass pins, truly doubled.

AndrewMajor
0

@Justin thanks for the link. It seemed weird I couldn’t find it so I was just in the process of emailing OneUp. Updated site versus Luddite test writer apparently.

just6979
+1 Andrew Major

I had just looked up that kit for a friend in the past few weeks, so I had it handy in browser history.

BarryW
+1 Briain

This is an interesting one to me. While I don't like the feeling of slight wiggle in the seatpost on my 210 while moving the bike around, I literally never notice it while riding. 

So I've been trying to put that into the 'needs to be mentally recalibrated' category and quit worrying about it. And honestly if I'm riding a saddle with all the flex/rock as possible (SqLab with the elastomer removed) maybe it's an actual plus?

Any thoughts about that?

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AndrewMajor
0

The side to side twisting action of play in a dropper post is, in my mind, a lot different than the moves-with-the-rider tuning of say SQLab or BY-Sagma saddles. Sort of like differentiating The movement of a Fasst Flexx bar from that of a loose headset or a floating brake rotor vs. a loose caliper.

That said, I know lots and lots of riders who WILL the play away, so who am I to say massive motion between, for example, pedals and axles isn’t providing a more comfortable ‘floating’ engagement. 

———

OneUp does sell bigger anti-rotation pins and they make a difference.

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Jankslayer
0

This comment has been removed.

just6979
0

"forget to recharge their posts ... this change removes that saggy seat post frustration"

Since when does the air charge have anything to do with holding you up? The hydraulics hold you up, the air just returns the post to extended when the oil valve is open. Forgetting* to "recharge" just gets you slow return, not sagging.

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AndrewMajor
0

I don’t know why it’s the case with V2. Something to do with the timing of how the valve closes versus the position of the post when the air spring can’t extend it fully? Something to do with cartridge design? 

Slickoleum on the seal head and recommended air pressure are generally the solution.

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tdc_worm
0

A couple of notes that are a bit confusing if you do not dive into the dimensions chart:

1) "Total length is up to 10mm shorter and compressed stack height is 3mm shorter than V2" (a positive) implies there is total length reduction on ALL models. However the 210mm and 90mm grow by 5mm in length (a negative). 

2) Stack height of V2 is 33mm on all models. Stack height is 30mm on all diameters except 34.9, which is 25mm (an 8mm reduction).  

3) If you are upgrading from a V2 to V3, don't expect the V3 to be your answer if you are using all of your insertion depth with a 210 or 90, unless your seat tube is 34.9mm haha. This hurts my strategy of a small post diameter plus shim to save on weight and to make the seat post portable from frame to frame for us serial bike hoppers.

4) the indexing of the actuator is important. On almost seat tubes, if they are kinked, they are kinked in the direction of the front wheel. If they are interrupted by a pivot bolt/axle, they are interrupted on the side facing the front wheel. If the indexing is consistent with what is shown on the pics on OU's website, you can actually achieve greater insertion in many bikes. I have two V2s that are not consistent with that, and the actuator runs in to a linkage bolt. I do understand that you can rotate the lower tube in 60* increments that help to alleviate this, but it does throw off the graphics on the lower tube, but the gives me anxiety because the appropriate amount of vanity makes you go faster....

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AndrewMajor
0

"it does throw off the graphics on the lower tube, but the gives me anxiety because the appropriate amount of vanity makes you go faster...."

I love this. 

"However the 210mm and 90mm grow by 5mm in length (a negative)."

The growth of the 210mm is a potential negative in terms of fitment for some riders on some bikes but I have to imagine it's a very small percentage. In my experience, riders with shorter legs who want to absolutely maximize how much drop they're running are very cognizant* of frame insertion depth when buying a bike.

I would suggest the increased length, and improved bushing overlap is going to be a net benefit to significantly more riders running a 210mm OneUp than it will be a detraction for folks who need a few mm more clearance. 

*In my experience they are less cognizant of saddle/rear tire clearance at bottom-out with the post fully lowered.

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just6979
+1 Velocipedestrian

Rotate a full 180, vanity restored.

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dan
0

It’s pretty remarkable the amount of fanfare so soon after a new version of a post that in fact most of us didn’t really think needed improvement. When I saw on various platforms that there was a V3, I quickly looked for an electronic doodad, and in (thankfully!) seeing none, kept scrolling. But making time to read Andrew’s post today, it brings a smile to my face to have the thought “They’ve done it again!” 

I have purchased two 240s in the last year or so and am happy to report like others that they just work. Not the smoothest, no, but otherwise completely dependable. I am however interested in the 2.1 head for these posts and will strongly consider a v3 for a bike I just added to the stable.

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syncro
0

Good discussion and insights going on here. One point that's been brought up and is seems a bit understated is how the Sea to Sky (S2S) corridor is pretty unique when it comes to the mtb world. We arguably have the greatest concentration of riders riding year round in some of the most challenging conditions (trails and weather). So it's probably worth noting that the bikes/gear that people use here and say work or work well can be considered as pretty reliable comments.  This isn't much of a secret though. The idea that a certain brand's post is getting tossed or considered not great within that context doesn't surprise me. That said, I think it's a bit irresponsible to label something as hot garbage from a journalistic perspective and can appreciate Clapforcanada's objections to it. 

FWIW I've ridden a Joplin, Highline, and 1UP V2.1. Joplin worked not too bad, but the seat clamp was pretty weak. Highline has been good, same with the 1UP which has a bit of play but nothing I'm concerned with. The Highline "feels" like a higher quality product than the 1UP, but I def like the easy serviceability of the 1UP.

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