ryan walters endura500mt review cover.jpeg
Product Intro/First Impressions

Introducing Endura MT500 Burner Flat Shoes

Words Ryan Walters (with info from Endura)
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Mar 1, 2022
Reading time

It turns out that I’m really picky when it comes to shoes. For as long as I can remember, I’ve stuck with a brand that is basically synonymous with flat pedals - a company whose name starts with an “F” and ends with “ive Ten”. Every time I try to break my streak and try something new, I’ve almost always been disappointed. I’ve learned that I’m after a very specific combination of high pedal grip, with a sole stiffness somewhere between “medium” to “low”.    

So, when I was asked to check out Endura’s first stab at a flat pedal shoe, I was excited - and a little bit nervous. I mean, this is their FIRST shoe, what are the chances of them getting it right on their first try?

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"Grip is excellent right out of the box - without that overly “locked-in” sensation that is common with my regular brand."

Well, it turns out that Endura did their homework on the MT500 Burner Flat, and then tested the bejeezus out of it for good measure. The result is a shoe that (in my opinion) is on par with the long-time reigning champ of grip. A good shoe is a combination of comfortable fit, the right stiffness, pedal grip, and protection to keep your feet in one piece. I’m usually able to judge if a shoe works for me within the first 5 minutes of riding, and after that long with the Burners, I actually said out loud: “Aw yeeeah, these work!!”

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So far, Ryan approves.

The Burner is comfortable on and off the bike, has a sole stiffness that I’ll call “medium," and hits the sweet spot for support, while still allowing your foot to conform to the pedal. Grip is excellent right out of the box - without that overly “locked-in” sensation that is common with my regular brand. These shoes are seriously impressive, especially considering they are Endura's first stab at footwear. 

I’ll be riding the soles off a pair of Burners, and reporting back on long-term performance and durability. I don’t want to jinx it, but maybe the Burner is the shoe to break my streak with that other brand…..

Text by Ryan Walters

Photos - Deniz Merdano

Information and photos below provided by Endura


Endura Enters The Footwear Game

StickyFOOT Rubber

Throughout the development of the footwear line, the importance of the rubber compound on the sole has been highlighted as a key element. Developed specifically for the needs of the modern MTB rider, Endura’s StickyFOOT rubber compounds use a unique concoction of ingredients to create outsoles specifically tuned to offer the perfect balance of pedal grip and durability, providing unrivaled performance and a hardwearing long lifespan.

Used in all pedal contact areas on Endura footwear, the StickyFOOT Grip compound offers maximum grip, conforming to pedal pins and locking the foot in place on the pedals. Combining a high level of walking traction with high durability StickyFOOT offers a long lifespan in the areas of the sole likely to experience higher levels of wear and tear.

endura humvee flat pedal shoe.jpeg

The Humvee - Flat Pedal Shoe. Multi-use versatility is at the core of this shoe. It can be comfortably worn as a casual shoe around town, in the workshop or at the pub but is always ready for you to jump on your bike and go for a ride. All this while benefiting from a StickyFoot™Grip bottom to keep you securely in contact with the pedals.

MSRP: 119.99 USD

endura burner flat pedal shoe.jpeg

The MT500 - Burner Flat Pedal Shoe. A performance flat pedal mountain shoe designed to support the foot and handle abuse, reinforced toe and heel box provide additional protection and an EVA midsole adds shock absorption for when things get a little sketchy. Endura’s proprietary StickyFoot™Grip rubber compound has been used for the pedal area of the sole, the rubber deforms around pedal pins, locking your feet in place and giving you optimal control over your bike.

MSRP: 149.99 USD

Ergonomistry

Developed with ergonomics expert Phil Burt, Endura’s exclusive EGM insole maximizes comfort and power transfer in both MT500 shoe models, using the following components:

Metatarsal Button - This carefully placed, contoured soft raised button helps spread your big toe from the rest, greatly improving your forefoot function and comfort-vital in mountain biking, while preventing the unwanted scrunching of the toes.

Sole Stimulant - These small raised soft tactile dots are strategically placed to improve your foot's proprioception, greatly improving its ability to soften and stiffen through coordinated muscular contractions.

Power Arch - Carefully profiled and contoured support helps the arch of your foot to cope better with the conflicting demands that riding places upon it, delivering better power transfer and improved comfort.

endura mt500 burner clipess shoe.jpeg

The MT500 - Burner Clipless Shoe. Performance coupled with an all-mountain aesthetic. The MT500 Burner clipless mountain bike shoe benefits from an off-set cleat box with increased longitudinal adjustment. This enables a wide range of stance options, allowing every rider to position their foot over the pedal exactly where they want. An EGM insole is included to ensure that your feet remain comfortable and secure while the toe and heel tread has been designed to give you great walking traction if needed.

  • MSRP:$159.99

Endura was founded in Scotland in 1993 with a no-nonsense commitment to advancing the performance and function of cycle apparel for all. As a maverick brand, it immediately launched a host of novel and challenging products that have gone on to earn iconic status globally and in many cases reset the benchmark of function and durability for the industry. This philosophy and disruptive innovation has carried the brand from Scottish local hero to global market leader.

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Comments

eriksg
eriksg
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+2 Velocipedestrian Ryan Walters

Definitely looking at these for when my current Freeriders give out. I could use some more sole stiffness and support, though the relatively lower level of grip would be my only concern. Looking forward to long term findings!

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

I personally have lots of experience on the Freeriders, and the Burner certainly has a stiffer sole. I'd say the pedal grip is pretty close between the two, maybe too close to call. My Impact Pros have noticeably higher grip than both the Freerider and the Burner.

I really like the Freerider, but the upper protection is super lacking (more purple toes than I care to admit!), and they fall apart a bit too easily. I also wish the Freerider sole was a bit stiffer. All that said, the Freerider probably has the best pedal feel I've found, so I'm willing to sacrifice in those other areas for that. On the other hand, the Adidas era Impact Pro has excellent upper protection, is a bit on the stiff side, and the pedal grip is almost too much for me. They're also quite heavy and expensive.

At the risk of jinxing this review, it feels like the Burner has managed to combine the best attributes of the two, so I'm pretty excited about that.

Reply

Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Ryan Walters

I got some fancy stiff Northwaves that I thought I really liked, until I put my worn out flexy Freeriders back on. The more flexible sole let me feel my feet better which made me feel more athletic and connected to the bike.

So I'm not sure if stiffer is better anymore

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Dogl0rd

Yeah, too stiff is definitely not good for flat shoes. I'd rather have a shoe that was too flexy than too stiff. I recently tried a shoe from an established brand - it had a very stiff sole with poor grip. It was the most awful riding experience - if I had the option of cutting the ride short to just get back to my car, I would have. Riding in them was terrifying, and I honestly felt in danger at some moments. My feet were bouncing all over the place, and I was constantly blowing off the pedals.

Reply

eriksg
eriksg
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Dogl0rd

I don't think I need or want *stiff*. Just slightly stiffer than the Freeriders. The more I work on riding technique and turning the bike with my feet, the more I notice the flex and lack of arch support, which I did not notice in more passive riding/turning with the bars. But pedal feel is still important to me, vs. having no feedback whatsoever.

Reply

Dogl0rd
Dogl0rd
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Totes on the same page as both you guys

cheapondirt
cheapondirt
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+2 eriksg Ryan Walters

It's just looks, but I like the looks of these. Purposeful in design, technical, but not weird.

Reply

jt
JT
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 Alex Hoinville

These look to hit some marks for me: ankle protection, ankle strap and laces, dirt digging soles where needed. The only thing that has me waiting for a LT review is sole adhesion. I have been gunshy of shoes that don't have the outsole stitched to the body due to a myriad of shoes letting me down that weren't able to stay together. There are a lot of things that ruin a ride, and having your outsole peeling off is definitely one of em.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

Agreed. My first impression of these shoes is very good, and I've had about 5 big rides so far on them with no real issues. I hope to report back with a longer term review with more good news. Stay tuned.....

Reply

cyclotoine
cyclotoine
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

The all important question. What is your 5.10 size and what were you running in these? I read other reviews saying these are a bit roomy in the toe and a bit less grippy. I tried ride concepts and my foot was too loose within the shoe, I went back to 5.10 freerider pro because it fits more snug around my foot.

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
3 months, 3 weeks ago
+1 goose8

I am usually a 10.5 to 11.0 in FiveTen shoes, and I'm on the 10.5 Burner. I personally find the length to be pretty darn close between the two brands, but the Burner feels a touch narrower.

The Burner is very comfortable, and feels very snug and secure on my feet. They are slightly less grippy than FiveTens, but I think this might be a good thing. Still debating that one...

Reply

hongeorge
hongeorge
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

And those Five Tens you have - are they the new, smaller Adidas sizing, or the older sizing?

(Never simple, is it?)

Reply

rwalters
Ryan Walters
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

So, I currently have a pair of Freeriders that I believe are pre-Adidas, and those are U.S. 10.5. Those shoes are quite snug in the toe box. I also have a fairly new pair of Impact Pros that are post-Adidas, and they have more room in the toe box, and they’re also size U.S. 10.5. Those two shoes have completely different construction though, so hard to make comparisons. 

I also have an apology to make - it turns out the Endura Burners I have are actually U.S. size 11.0. I was told they’d be 10.5, and didn’t actually check label. My bad. I certainly couldn’t go down to 10.5 in the Burner, it would be too small. The 11.0 is basically perfect, as I don’t like much wiggle room - my toe almost touches front of toe box.

Reply

stinhambo
Steven Hambleton
3 months, 3 weeks ago
0

No EU48 means no sale! I'll stick with Specialized 2FO Roost when my current ones expire.

Reply

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