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FIRST IMPRESSIONS REVIEW

Introducing the 2021 Santa Cruz Nomad XO1

Words Cam McRae
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Dec 15, 2020
Reading time

Every once in awhile something in life comes along that alters what you believe is true. The parameters determined by experience are eroded by new information. Or sometimes it's old information presented in a new way. It wasn't that I thought I no longer liked 650b wheels,* it was simply that I was quite sure I preferred 29. When I became so enamoured with the most recent incarnation of the Santa Cruz Bronson, I wasn't fully aboard the 29er train but since that time I've ridden big wheels almost exclusively, with the odd fat or mullet foray. And I thought I was done. It turns out my my unwritten obituary for anything smaller than 29" wheels was premature.

*"27.5" remains deceiving and easily as awkward as the metric nomenclature

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She cuts a nice silhouette.

I've tested enough Santa Cruz bikes to know my sizing, but it's a bit odd. I'm quite happy on size large 29ers, although a reach number between L and XL would likely be perfection, but for 27" wheels an XL fits me beautifully while a large feels a little small. I had a hard time understanding this, considering the reach numbers between models of different wheel sizes is relatively consistent, but Santa Cruz Product Manager Josh Kissner had an explanation; "With a 29er, the taller rear axle makes it harder to get your weight rearward and get the front unweighted. So I think you end up riding more back on a 29er to kind of make up for that, which kind of stretches out your arms." Makes sense to me.

DSC06746_denizmerdano_scnomad.jpg

The large is just a little small for me, but that didn't prevent me from going big on the Newmad (just kidding - I don't actually go big)

Highlights

  • 27.5-inch wheels
  • 170mm of lower link driven VPP rear travel + 170mm fork • 64-degree head angle and 78-degree SA (in Hi)
  • Size-specific CS lengths
  • C & CC frame & Reserve 30 carbon wheel options
  • Sizes: S, M, L, XL
  • Improved leverage curve and twin swingarm uprights
  • 37mm fork offset
  • Available with coil and air shocks
  • SRAM Universal Derailleur Hanger
  • Lifetime warranty
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Call them fun-sized wheels. If you aren't racing, doesn't it make sense to make fun job one?

Unfortunately there was a miscommunication and I was sent a large Nomad. I rode it in the high position, which stretches the reach just slightly, but it still felt a little cramped. The good news for me is that if I had received the correct size, my 29er would probably be up for sale right now, based on how much I enjoyed the Nomad in a less than optimal size. Fortunately the Nomad, like every other new bike, has grown longer in every size so the large now has a reach of 472mm (in the high setting) vs. the old Nomad at 460mm and the current Bronson at 459. So it wasn't entirely tragic and I was able to soldier on.

DSC06557_denizmerdano_scnomad.jpg

I high-centred with a loud thunk when I landed this little drop. Thankfully Santa Cruz spec'ed a OneUp bash guard that took all the impact.

Our example weighs 32lbs without pedals which is very respectable for a bike with 170mm of travel front and rear. And it climbs like a lightweight as well. One of my favourite developments is the size-specific rear triangles. A rider on an XS is no longer stuck with the same rear end as a rider on an XL and vice versa. So the longer 236mm (high) chain stays of the large add some climbing stability and bite (at least that's one of Josh Kissner's explanations) compared to the 430mm stays of either the Bronson or the previous Nomad in the same size. Another performance factor for climbing and descending is the additional swingarm upright. The previous Nomad was Santa Cruz's first shot at porting the lower link driven shock architecture of the V10 down to a smaller bike, and the single vertical strut was not the perfect solution for dealing with lateral forces up or down. All this adds up to a long travel bike that climbs shockingly well, despite everyone knowing 29ers are superior climbers. From memory it climbs every bit as well as the Bronson and very close to the 145mm rear travel Hightower. I also found, when climbing Good Sir Martin, Mount Seymour's switchback-laden climbing trail, that I had a little more room on every tight corner .

DSC06785_denizmerdano_scnomad.jpg

I got a little squirrelly entering this chute but managed to rein it in thanks to excellent brakes and tires.

But let's not get bogged down about climbing; this is a gravity machine after all. It's no longer surprising to me when I find I get on well with a new bike from Santa Cruz, but with the Nomad I felt like I'd been riding it for weeks. I was sending lines on the edge of my ability* on the very first ride. And feeling, dare I say, rather spicy. I got a leg up because Santa Cruz provided some comprehensive setup numbers, compiled by in-house suspension-focussed engineer and elite DH rider, Kiran Mackinnon. The numbers were pretty much bang on for me, although I took off a turn of high and low speed compression front and rear to compensate for our current chilly weather. I rode with 85psi in the Fox 38 fork and 185psi in the Fox X2 rear shock and everything seemed to sing.

*note - this isn't saying much

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The suspension choices for the XO1 build are a highlight. I'm a big fan of the redesigned Fox X2 rear shock.

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This was my first extended period on the Fox 38 and it was predictably excellent. Like the Zeb, the added torsional stiffness is a confidence booster.

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Geo numbers courtesy Santa Cruz.

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Steep terrain is my happy spot, and the Nomad's as well thanks to the 63.7 low/64º high head angle.


It's cool that we're able to offer choice and we want to let the market decide when 27 five is dead, right? We don't want to preemptively kill it. We'll keep putting them out there and if people stop buying them eventually then we'll stop making them, - Santa Cruz Product Manager Josh Kissner

The modern geometry with smaller wheels make me want to jump off everything I can and take high lines into corners. A bonus was that the janky tech trails the Shore is famous for got a little bit easier. I felt like I had more room to set up between moves because it was easy to do shorter radius turns, despite the 1257mm wheelbase.

Turns are of course a strength of smaller wheels because you can angle the bike more steeply and more easily because of the lower axles. It often felt like I was on a root beer coloured light speeder because of the velocity with which the new Nomad changes direction. Rather than turn, the Nomad seems to carve, even with our current slick conditions. Despite my enthusiasm, I did have a day when I occasionally was wishing for 29" wheels. We started off in the snow and I was feeling great and having a ball. The same feelings continued once the snow gave way to glistening woodwork, but one we got to the part of the ride with long steep rock faces, my confidence ebbed a little. I was gripping the bars a little too tight and just not feeling it, but I know it wasn't the bike. I'd ridden the same trail a few days earlier and had a blast. Feeling a little sketchy, the bottoms of the rock faces looked more distant than usual and more abrupt. Riding with a little less hutzpah, bigger wheels would have taken the edge off those hard landings and eased my pain just a little. In every other situation I was completely happy on 2seven5.

The leverage curve has been changed somewhat but for a slightly lower ratio throughout the travel, but the changes aren't dramatic. One of the final engineering challenges was the suspension kinematics and Santa Cruz engineers tried various configurations as Josh Kissner explained:
"In the end we ended up in a really similar spot actually, but we tried lower progression, higher progression, lower average leverage etc; long story short, we played around with a bunch of stuff. The small improvements we made combined with large improvements to shocks, in our mind makes a much improved package."

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Corners are more fun on smaller wheels.

Component Spec.

As seems to be the case with Santa Cruz in recent years, there is very little I could gripe about in the component choices, but not much to get too excited about either. Maxxis EXO+ rubber, with a MaxxGrip Assegai up front and a MaxxTerra DHRII out back are great choices but the coil spec. models get Double Downs front and rear. SRAM Code RSC brakes work great as usual, and the drivetrain is full XO1 rather than some hybrid with a cheaper chain and cassette. The OneUp Bash is a nice addition that I've already tried out.

Preliminary Verdict

After just 5 rides on the Nomad I'm convinced it could be my personal bike. It's a blast to ride and it does everything well, and that was my impression riding a size that was just slightly too small, which was enough to keep my confidence in check just a little. It's important to remember that while 29" wheels are the flavour of the moment, with a side of mullet, 650b wheels are exactly the same shape, and they roll even better in some circumstances. Something that gets overlooked is that, while 29ers slow down less when they encounter a bump in the trail, 275 wheels speed up faster when you pump the backsides. If fun is your goal, tweener wheels in general, and the new Nomad in particular, should be on your radar.

Also - because of the sizing issue, Trevor Hansen is going to handle the long term review. He’s already ridden the bike and it fits him very well.

The Nomad Carbon CC XO1 (seen here) or the XO1 Coil will set you back 7499 USD with Raceface ARC rims rather than the Santa Cruz Reserves seen here. The Carbon C base model is 4999 USD.

Head to Santa Cruz Bicycles for more info, after you watch Sam Dale, his Nomad and his van in the video below.

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Age - 55

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 160lbs/72.5kg

Ape Index - 0.986

Inseam - 32"/81cm

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Fifth Horseman

Bar Width - 760mm

Preferred Reach - 475-490mm

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Comments

Timer
0
Timer  - Dec. 15, 2020, 1:27 a.m.

"but for 27" wheels an XL fits me beautifully while a large feels a little small."

Could this simply be because 27" bikes generally have lower stack numbers? When i bought my current bike, i was torn between a 29" in L and a 27" in XL. Both felt good the latter had more reach but 40mm less stack. Now they changed that a bit and the new Nomad has a high stack for 27", it should feel closer to the Megatower in the same size.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 Beau Miller pacificfourthwest
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 7:49 a.m.

Your theory has merit but alas that was not my experience. The large Megatower felt nice and roomy but the XL felt unwieldy, particularly in tight downhill switchbacks. It’s also possible I would have got used to it in time but I had only a few days in NZ to get sorted.

Reply

DogVet
-1 MuscogeeMasher
Hugo Williamson  - Dec. 15, 2020, 4:40 a.m.

Is the Csu / lowers interface the wrong way round? Looks odd on the pic of you with your foot on the rear wheel .

Reply

rnayel
+3 Beau Miller pacificfourthwest ollyh
RNAYEL  - Dec. 15, 2020, 6:49 a.m.

That’s the 37mm offset.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 Beau Miller pacificfourthwest ollyh
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 7:44 a.m.

Likely the 37mm offset I’m thinking. The lowers are likely the same and the offset is probably at the crown as usually seems to be the case.

Agreed though. It looks odd upon closer inspection.

Reply

Brother-Lu
-1 MuscogeeMasher
Brother Lu  - Dec. 15, 2020, 6:07 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

FLATCH
0
flatch  - Dec. 15, 2020, 7:50 a.m.

Kind of makes them look bent

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+4 Beau Miller pacificfourthwest Deniz Merdano ollyh
Pete Roggeman  - Dec. 15, 2020, 7:13 a.m.

We're gonna need to start reviewing these launch vids, that was fantastic.

Oh yeah, nice first look, Cam!

Reply

Bad-Sean
+5 flatch Beau Miller Cam McRae Niels ollyh
Sean Chee  - Dec. 15, 2020, 8:18 a.m.

If only it came in aluminium. It's a hard sell for me to spend that much on a frame as it stands.

Reply

FLATCH
+1 Cam McRae
flatch  - Dec. 15, 2020, 8:26 a.m.

That, and I’ve always been concerned about what I may do to a carbon frame.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Beau Miller
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 9:46 a.m.

Fingers crossed!

Reply

Hepcat
+2 Cam McRae Skooks
Beau Miller  - Dec. 15, 2020, 9:02 a.m.

Yup, I'm also a different size frame between 27.5 and 29. Your other findings about a bit of 29er awkwardness on tight downhill turns and getting the weight back exactly parallel what I've experienced too. 🍻

I've been on a 29 for a year, but I did go shorter travel as this seemed to mitigate those shortcomings for some reason.

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dorkweed
+1 Beau Miller
dorkweed  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10:17 a.m.

a question for the masses: does lifetime warranty sway you at all on the SC bikes? How many keep a bike beyond 5 years?

and a note: the SC website has frame only price at $4049 - get em while they're hot! (has to be wrong...)

Reply

fartymarty
+5 Niels Skooks Beau Miller 4Runner1 ollyh
fartymarty  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10:51 a.m.

If your bike has geo that fits you and your trails why wouldn't you keep it for more than 5 years?

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+6 Beau Miller fartymarty AJ Barlas pacificfourthwest StuartG ollyh
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 1:52 p.m.

There was a time when that was true, and hopefully it will be true again, but the geo changes in the last five years have been dramatic and the performance and fun gains are massive. Once you get on a bike that fits it's impossible to go back. 

My question is why did it take bike companies so long to figure this out? Particularly considering Chris Porter has been telling us for years. I really hope it was a reluctance to change rather than planned obsolescence.

Reply

fartymarty
+3 Cam McRae AJ Barlas ollyh
fartymarty  - Dec. 15, 2020, 11:51 p.m.

The skeptic in me says bike companies didn't want to jump to "Porter / Geometron" geo so they could roll out "longer / slacker" for a few years more sales.  It seems to have worked as we are only starting to get mainstream bike companies with progressive geo.

I bought a Starling Murmur nearly 2 years ago now and am happy that I won't be selling it in the next 5 years as the geo is in the right ballpark where adjustments (if needed) can be made with an angleset / offset bushes.

Reply

StuartG
+2 ollyh Cam McRae
StuartG  - Dec. 17, 2020, 8:02 a.m.

Yet again, NSMB never fails to offer the more insightful, higher quality reviews than the other outlets. My question or thought is that the almost wholesale adoption of 29" wheels in the industry has coincided with the modern geometry of slack head angles and longer reach etc. Has geometry progression allowed too much of the credit to fall at the feet of the 29" wheel? I don't doubt 29ers are faster against the clock, but do they actually offer improvements in ride quality, entertainment and enjoyment? 

I'm 6ft and on a Yeti SB6 which is a great bike but I am looking at the modern geometry and wondering if the new crop are even more enjoyable to ride. Almost resigned to a 29er, up pops the Nomad and seems to offer another option (and keep my 27.5" nice wheels). With covid, demo bike opportunities are going to be few and far between for months to come. Given your experience I'd love to hear your thoughts on the matter.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Jan. 21, 2021, 6:59 p.m.

Sorry, missed this one. And thanks for the props! 

I have to say that the Nomad has opened my eyes to how great 27.5 bikes ride and has me rethinking what I'll ride in the future. I don't get on that well with mullets - although the Bullit was nice - but the Nomad and Bronson were undoubtedly two of my favourite bikes over the last few years. I'm not even sure if 29ers are faster where we ride!

I'd certainly be open to riding a 27.5 as my next personal bike.

Reply

tehllama42
+2 Cam McRae ollyh
Tehllama42  - Dec. 16, 2020, 2:25 p.m.

Amen to this.

The biggest update I'm considering to my 2014 Instinct next year is that I can go LongShock and Mullet (basically nudge to a 7.875x2.25" shock, but run a 650B wheel out back).  The geometry just slackens out slightly, I add 16mm of travel, and gain the ability to use DH casing semislick tires (that just don't seem to exist in the real world for 29ers, which is dumb).

I do think adjustable and forward-looking bikes are always worth it, and it turns out spending 5+ years amortizing the cost of a bicycle does make carbon-fibre-everything sit well within the price range I can tolerate.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+1 Beau Miller
Jerry Willows  - Dec. 15, 2020, 12:07 p.m.

that's kind of the going price for a frame....  probably super tough to get right now.

Reply

dorkweed
+1 ollyh
dorkweed  - Dec. 15, 2020, 1:44 p.m.

you miss my point - that's a good price for a frame like that. Pinkbike has it listed for $4649 CAD.

Reply

tehllama42
+1 Doug M.
Tehllama42  - Dec. 16, 2020, 2:27 p.m.

Oof, that's a lot of moose-nopoly dollary-doos.  I don't think it's an outrageous price, but that's only because of demand... that puts you in a Marin carbon fiber framed complete bike, on parts that actually belong on a trail.

Reply

fed
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman ollyh
fed  - Dec. 15, 2020, 7:08 p.m.

In my case i decided to go for a SC bc of their warranty just in case something happened, not because i was planning on keeping the bike ten years. i knew they were not going to said no if something happened to the frame, one of my friends had a frame replaced without any fuzz. I get  new bearing every year free and their customer service is top notch. That is were the extra money goes on their price, to me is worth it.

Reply

woodyak
0
woodyak  - Dec. 24, 2020, 10:31 a.m.

Nope. Lifetime Warranty has actually made things worse for SantaCruz (maybe others?). Just before they went to lifetime warranty they had more of a no questions ask policy and would warranty pretty much anything that wasn't abuse, including damage caused by crashes. Now it's more likely to be a crash replacement deal than a no cost replacement. So 5 year no questions asked or lifetime, but expect to pay if something breaks.

I guess the newer way is more fair, but don't forget frames have jumped up in price dramatically in the past few years. Thankfully, bikes don't break like they used to.

Reply

Tbone
+5 Beau Miller Cam McRae DadStillRides Pete Roggeman ollyh
Trevor Hansen  - Dec. 15, 2020, 12:05 p.m.

Finally I can get this beast out of Cam's mouldy bunker and under my mouldy pants for the long term review. I am looking forward to giving it a thorough thrashing, some back to back testers with Cam against my Enduro and his Yeti , maybe play with some suspension (Dear Seb send coil asap) and get to know this thing on an intimate basis.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+11 Graham Driedger Trevor Hansen DadStillRides pacificfourthwest Matt Lee Velocipedestrian Pete Roggeman Deniz Merdano Beau Miller ollyh Andrew Major
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10:07 p.m.

Changed my mind. Sorry.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+3 pacificfourthwest Velocipedestrian ollyh
AJ Barlas  - Dec. 16, 2020, 12:37 p.m.

Hahahahaa.

Reply

Danno
+1 Cam McRae
Danno  - Dec. 15, 2020, 1:56 p.m.

Hi Cam, great write up! I'm currently in a warranty/crash replacement situation with Santa Cruz for my Large Nomad v4 and may be given the option for a replacement v5 as there are no v4's in stock. I'm a hair under 6' with a 34" inseam and positive ape  index (around 2") and feel that v4 could be longer. I'm just wondering if the new large given the changes in seat tube angle, reach, and fork offset etc equate to a similar (conservative?) large size with the new geo, and if I should be considering upsizing. However the ~500mm reach on the XL seems like a big jump, any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks!

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 Beau Miller ollyh
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10 p.m.

Sounds to me like you are an XL. Some factors to be considered are bar width, stack height and your flexibility to name a few. When I was less flexible I actually rode mediums for years and loved them because I was crunched up like an old man. Now that I can reach comfortably both in the saddle and standing, larger bikes are much more comfortable. Not to mention the impact of proper technique to take advantage of my mobility. Since a little study and some great coaching I have a better stance on the bike which stretches me out. 

Back to bars and stack, shorter bars can make a larger bike smaller as will a taller stack so you have some wiggle room if you find the bike too long at first. The other question is how aggressively you want to ride and how skilled you are. Josh Bryceland is a gangly 6'2" as I recall but he's so skilled that he prefers a smaller size. I like the ability to move fore and aft fairly aggressively without going ass over teakettle, which a longer reach affords, and Ratboy doesn't need. 

My first longer bike was the XL Bronson and it blew me away. I felt like a (secular) born again mountain biker. I've gotten to the point where I'm quite comfortable going down hill on bikes well over 500mm, like the XL Kona Honzo ESD I rode for awhile. Funny how this is the year of getting the wrong sizes due to communication breakdowns. 

There are a few questions you'll have to ask yourself, but right now I'm of the mind that you want to ride the largest frame you can handle comfortably. Good luck!

Reply

Danno
+3 Cam McRae AJ Barlas ollyh
Danno  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10:29 p.m.

I really appreciate your response Cam - it sounds like I definitely need to give upsizing more consideration. Thanks again!

Reply

jason
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman ollyh
jason  - Dec. 16, 2020, 12:58 p.m.

Not SantaCruz specific, but I now ride a large Transition Scout (27.5" wheels, 150/160 travel, 485 reach), 37mm offset fork, with a 40mm stem, and a 780mm bar.  I am 5'11" with a 31" inseam, and unlike Cam who is a waif (:)) I am a respectable 195lb (hahaha).  I could not imagine going back to even a 456 reach of my previous Patrol.  I ride same trails as Cam for the most part and love that I rarely feel that tippy OTB feeling.  The bike is plenty moveable in tight turns, steeps are awesome, in fact other than slightly less travel, the bikes seem very similar.  Given that I don't see how you would not go XL on the Nomad.

Reply

mhaager2
+2 Beau Miller ollyh
Moritz Haager  - Dec. 15, 2020, 2:39 p.m.

Hey Cam

What are your thoughts around rider height and wheel size?  As a short rider at 5'6 I'm reluctant to go for a longer travel bike since standover becomes a real issue on mid to long travel 29rs. I went from a old 26" bike to a 29r and the difference in speed and climbing really was profound. I would hate to lose that.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 Beau Miller ollyh
Cam McRae  - Dec. 16, 2020, 10:44 a.m.

This is an area where I’m no expert but there are a few things I’d recommend. Find a bike shop or two with someone who is an expert on bike fit and pick their brain. Try lots of bikes. A mullet might be just the ticket for you. Big wheels are nice but as I just discovered they aren’t the holy grail. Fit is certainly more important. Good luck!

Reply

MuscogeeMasher
+5 Peter Carson Skooks Beau Miller AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman ollyh Dogl0rd
MuscogeeMasher  - Dec. 15, 2020, 4:44 p.m.

It's hysterical the number of people on various sites that are presumptuous enough to think that Fox, SC, and the reviewer all missed that the CSU\ uppers were on backwards but they, the reader, can set everyone straight.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 AJ Barlas Beau Miller ollyh
Cam McRae  - Dec. 15, 2020, 10:07 p.m.

LOL. TBH I didn't even notice it looked weird until it was pointed out because it looks completely normal in person because there is no optical illusion.

Reply

heathen
+2 Beau Miller ollyh
Heathen  - Dec. 16, 2020, 4:49 p.m.

Any idea how progressive the rear travel is? Sounds like they may have gone less progressive.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 Beau Miller ollyh Heathen
Cam McRae  - Dec. 16, 2020, 8:43 p.m.

I was told informally that it's slightly less progressive and the leverage rate is a little lower throughout the travel. Interesting considering it comes with both coil and air in the rear.

Reply

heathen
0
Heathen  - Dec. 17, 2020, 12:57 p.m.

That seems kind of counter to the current trend of bikes getting more progressive. I just moved from a 2018 Range C7.2 I belive it was 18% progressive. To a 2020 Scout that is 25% progressive. Same rock shox super deluxe. Man what a difference. The bottom out feel was way nicer. I have now switch to a Super Deluxe coil, my first coil bike. The ramp is perfect. I have no idea how people ride Patrols "on coil" with only 11% progression. It would just bottom out like crazy.

Reply

Mulletron
+4 Pete Roggeman Beau Miller ollyh Heathen
Mulletron  - Dec. 16, 2020, 7:05 p.m.

That Oxblood colour is incredible. Wow. Beautiful bike.

Reply

JSW07
0
JSW07  - Dec. 19, 2020, 8:20 a.m.

I just wanted to throw this out there as I had a similar experience on the Forbidden Druid. I tested the smaller size and LOVED the bike, in fact I found myself saying "this is the funnest bike I have ever ridden, but I need a size large", then ended up buying a Large and sold it after 8 rides because it was a COMPLETELY different bike when I was on the appropriate size.

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heathen
0
Heathen  - Dec. 19, 2020, 9 a.m.

So you loved the med and bought a large? Now you sold the large and have a medium? How tall are you?

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JSW07
0
JSW07  - Dec. 19, 2020, 9:34 a.m.

I did not say that I bought medium after selling the Large. My height and what has happened in the past is not the point of my comment...

My comment is about how sizing is crucial to how the bike handles which essentially affects ones exerpeince on the bike.

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - Dec. 21, 2020, 11:56 a.m.

I am curious about this as well.

Im 5'9" 32"inseam and as you may have seen my write ups, I have been on the medium Druid for a year now. 

I run a 35mm stem and sometime think if a large would be a better fit for faster, rougher trails. I do like the nimbleness of the medium in technical jank.

How tall are you and where do you ride?

Either way, hard to go wrong with a druid in geenral!

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JSW07
0
JSW07  - Dec. 21, 2020, 12:20 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

JSW07
0
JSW07  - Dec. 21, 2020, 12:20 p.m.

It's hard to imagine running a 35mm stem at our height on that bike in my opinion...I found the size Large at my height (5'9" 31" inseam) to be a different animal all together (in a bad way). The large is a lot more stable and less playful than the medium. The medium was more fun, the Large would be ideal if you were racing Enduro.

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