imposteredit
Beggars Would Ride

Imposter Syndrome

Photos Mike Ferrentino
Reading time

Once upon a time, I wrote a column comparing myself to a bird. As in, the mountain biking equivalent of a bird. I basically outed myself as a not very impressive downhiller (that'd be swift/swallow territory), a sub-mediocre marathon racer (your Canadian Geese and other truly epic migratory birds), and an otherwise capable but not spectacular rider. Nowhere near fast enough in any one discipline to be a hummingbird, lacking the killer instinct and raw power to be any sort of bird of prey. For this analogy, I chose a starling as my representative feathered avatar. This was, admittedly, a solid two decades and change before a bike brand of that name showed up, and before I found myself not-ironically buying one of those eponymously named frames. But there I was, pigeonholing myself, if you will, in one of the more circuitous flights of fancy I've indulged in while trying to loosely correlate human experience into some sort of nature-based analogy.

However, at that time, I had enough of a chip on my shoulder to consider myself a solid workhorse when it came to grinding out miles and chasing finish lines. Yeah, I know. Horses are not birds. Pegasus doesn't count. I also considered myself decent enough on a bike, pre-freeride explosion, to be thought of as a not totally shit bike handler. This was probably a bit of a reach on my part, but since I was neck deep in XC racing, there was ample evidence surrounding me every weekend that I was a long way from the bottom of the barrel in that regard. And, since XC racing was my jam, that is where I derived most of my self-esteem merits and demerits.

Meanwhile, I was working for a new magazine staffed by skiers. They thought that XC racing was dumb, that Lycra belonged on the road, and that people who both wore Lycra and raced XC were kooks. More or less. When the freeride explosion occurred a few years later they were jubilant. For my part, I cried quiet bitter tears, knowing that this signaled the end of what had been, for me, a great and beautiful chapter in the evolution of mountain biking. Not so coincidentally, I also came to realize that my self-perception of riding skill was woefully out of step with the new and rapidly changing standards of the time.

Time, being time, marches on regardless; not really caring about egos, burnout, trends or dwindling testosterone levels. But even though it has been a loooong time since I have pinned a number to a skinsuit, I still in some way identify more with that bygone version of myself than with the baggy clad old dude who can't really wheelie and who removes all the tokens from any suspension he is on that sports more than 150mm of travel.

Which, in a roundabout way brings us to the new, not yet ready to be mentioned by name, XC test bike that I took delivery of a week ago. A 120mm travel flexstay race whip with a twist grip lockout for both fork and shock at the same time, 1400-gram wheels wrapped in fast-rolling Rekons, and zero concessions toward the longer travel "trail" identity that has become intermixed with the original XC genus. As in, not even a single nod to downcountryism. In frame storage? Getthefuckouttahere. Run to the pits if you get a flat, loser.

Sweet Jesus, this thing is fast. And I totally feel like a fraud trying to review it.

See, for the past couple months, I have been exclusively riding the Starling. And I built the Starling on the stout side. Coil shock, Mezzer Pro fork, 1800, maybe 1900-gram wheelset with thick, sticky, T9 Butcher tires. At a guess, I would say this new test rig is about 12 pounds lighter than the Starling, and easily four of those pounds are in the wheels and tires. I have grown accustomed to just settling in when the ground tilts upwards and pedaling resolutely along, opting to slow down rather than pin the heart rate, because, let's face it, we aren't gonna set the world on fire anyway. Maybe that's defeatist, but the Starling isn't designed to excel at XC racing, so why pretend? Just enjoy the scenery, click off the miles until the fun stuff happens, and keep enough gas in the tank to get a little rowdy on the descents. "Who are you kidding, old man," the Interior Observer takes pains to point out. "It's not like you've got the juice in those hams to get out of your own way anymore, anyway."

But I had some shoes, right? Because you don't ride an XC race bike with flat pedals, and you don't ride an XC race bike with puffy footwear that looks like it was designed by refugees from the Disney wardrobe design department. I may be a little too rotund to comfortably walk around town in a skinsuit nowadays, but according to the extremely vocal heckling by the wife of a local racer (who I was in the process of lapping at the time, it bears mentioning) at a Surf City 'cross race in 1999, I was already questionably plus-sized to be rocking that look back then. So, even when I thought I was still fast, I was chunky. Point taken, however. Now I try to avoid being heckled by near total strangers for my attire. Nevertheless, shoes. There are some areas where we do not compromise. XC bike, XC shoes. This is not negotiable.

So yesterday I pulled on the shoes, ratcheted them down, clicked them into the not entirely XC worthy pedals I had blasphemously threaded into the very damn light cranks, and pedaled out of town on the new, as yet unnamed XC test bike.

I already said Sweet Jesus, right? But it bears repeating. Sure, XC bikes are narrowly focused and probably not what 90 percent of us need to be riding. And absolutely, they will not make your life easier when the terrain gets steep or chunky, and if the terrain gets both steep AND chunky they will probably be miserable. But oh dear lord they roll out like something magic. Most of my rides involve a few miles of pavement and some incredibly shitty washboard fireroad to get to the nuggets of trail that this stretch of desert has on tap. And I generally churn along on the monster truck tires of the Starling, not thinking about heart rate zones or average speeds, just watching the scenery roll by, slowly.

Those miles went by yesterday in about half the time that I am used to. And even though I was muttering to myself to stay mellow, keep the heart rate nice and calm, nothing to prove here, it took all my willpower to resist winding that damn thing up and pinning it until the entire horizon dissolved in a red haze.

Which, by the time I hit the trail, kind of became inevitable.

imposter2

And then I threw up. Okay, maybe not. But still... Those numbers had me wondering about the accuracy of the MacWatch, but after several finger on carotid countdowns I had to face the somewhat concerning reality that my lifelong above average max heart rate is no longer something to be proud of, and is instead maybe something to be backed away from carefully...

For an hour, I felt like a god. There is still something elementally glorious about a superlightweight, tightly focused, fast as hell bike. I suspect this elemental gloriousness is going to be something that becomes lost to most of us as we opt to ingest the hidden boost of electric assist, but damn, to be able to wind this thing up so fast, under my own power, and so easily go straight into my own red zone? That is a beautiful thing.

By comparison, I never managed to get my max HR over 175 on the same trails with the Starling. I suspect that has something to do with the fact that my ability to generate watts is slipping even though my heart rate can, apparently, still go through the roof when it wants to (to allay concerns from people who know about this stuff, back when I pinned numbers on regularly, my max HR was about 203. So I have always been rabbity, not that it ever seemed to have any advantages other than making me nervous about wearing the damn thing out too soon), and so I'd just run out of ability to motivate all that metal and rubber uphill before going into the red mist. The new bike, being much lighter and burdened with way less rotating mass, meanwhile, was a ticket straight into Zone 5. Only faster way there is staircase sprints.

The half hour after that glorious first hour was grim. It took about seven solid minutes of coasting downhill to get my heart rate to drop back below 160, and then I felt like my legs were blocks of wood.

I am old. I am heavy. I am of dwindling wattage. I am not qualified to really speak to the strengths of this bike. I am paying for yesterday. I do not care. I've got my shoes. And fast bikes are still absolutely awesome. Tomorrow we go again.

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

morgan-heater
+17 Brad Nyenhuis Adrian Bostock Velocipedestrian Kever NealWood vunugu Sandy James Oates Matt Cusanelli Spencer Nelson Skooks FlipSide Andy Eunson Hardlylikely tomis916 ZigaK cshort7 Bogey

There's a lot of geriatric health issue discussions happening in this comment section. Might be time for a new forum thread - "Failing meat engines" "Old guys leaning against stuff, breathing heavily" "Rides with easy access to restroom facilities"

Reply

Roxtar
+2 Andy Eunson Hardlylikely

"Rides with easy access to restroom facilities"

Maybe with enough emails we can get Trailforks to include that info.

Reply

mikeferrentino
+2 Kos Hardlylikely

It's a growing market segment...

Reply

Joe_Dick
+1 Mike Ferrentino

a while back I put out a survey to solicit community feedback for future development ect of one of the local trail net works. one of the old guys who is in his 80’s and still rides his ebike regularly commented about wanting an out house in the center of the trail network. I can ride the circumference of this network in an hour and change.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Morgan Heater

Indeed. My weight increased this winter too.

Reply

morgan-heater
0

Age and weight increase, but the ol' grim reaper keeps thinning the ranks.

Reply

JohnC
+16 Goon cxfahrer Mike Ferrentino Brad Sedola Sandy James Oates taprider shenzhe Andy Eunson lennskii vunugu Skooks Matt Cusanelli Hardlylikely tomis916 cshort7 lewis collins

Yup...this brilliant article unfortunately spoke to me on too many levels.  Thanks for helping me realilze I'm not the only one in this sorry camp.

Reply

Goon
+8 Mike Ferrentino taprider Cr4w Metacomet Vincent Edwards Hardlylikely tmb1956 Curveball

As an old chunky guy definitely Clydesdale class ,I really enjoyed the essay! Is there any chance of you putting all of your writing in a book of some sort.

I've been reading your stuff for years and I think it would be interesting to see the evolution of riding as you saw it

Reply

mikeferrentino
+9 donh taprider Carlos Matutes Vincent Edwards Hardlylikely tomis916 Curveball Bogey Muesliman

Funny you should ask. I'm working on a thing, but it's not likely to turn into a book anytime soon. Check back in a month, though.

Reply

xy9ine
+18 Mike Ferrentino ClydeRide Cr4w FlipSide BarryW Lu Kz Mammal mnihiser Velocipedestrian lennskii Carlos Matutes NealWood vunugu Spencer Nelson cheapondirt Hardlylikely Timer tomis916

it's a tiktok channel, yeah?

Reply

mikeferrentino
+10 Perry Schebel BarryW mnihiser Velocipedestrian Carlos Matutes vunugu Hardlylikely Timer tomis916 Curveball

I've been working super hard on my lip synch and dance moves...

Reply

Hawkinsdad
+8 Mike Ferrentino NealWood Skooks Hardlylikely Curveball handsomedan Todd Hellinga slimchances57

Hi Mike. I'm looking forward to whatever you're working on next. I've been a loyal reader since your early Bike days. Thank you for another great article. It incited this question. "What the hell is wrong with acknowledging one's age, fitness, health, and belt size?" We old guys have wisdom gleaned from years of experiences, injuries, and from embarrassment. Frankly, the older I get, the less I care what others think. I have nothing to prove. At 63, I am older than most riders I come across, but I've ridden the hell out of this aging carcass for 58 years and I've spent 39 so far on a mountain bike. I ride for my enjoyment, without ego-infused pressure to go over my head. I ride with gratitude, the knowledge that a cold beer awaits at the Tacoma, and the intention of riding another day. I may be less fast and lean. However, I'm certainly wiser and more appreciative of every ride I get out there with my riding buddies and my pesky pals, the ravens.

Reply

mikeferrentino
+10 lennskii Adrian Bostock Carlos Matutes Hardlylikely tomis916 Curveball shapethings handsomedan Todd Hellinga Muesliman

From a marketing perspective, it is generally frowned upon to talk about aging unless it is done from the perspective of selling things to slow down the aging process. In contemporary US social culture, aging is not part of any real dialog, and so we have this massive tidal wave of aging boomers and now gen-Xers who have been pretending that this is not happening to them and are suddenly faced with not only the whole messy weirdness of aging and death but also something resembling societal ostracism. God forbid people actually talk about any of this in real, natural terms.

Everyone should read "Come Of Age" by Stephen Jenkinson. And maybe "Die Wise" as well, since most of us are totally clueless about all this.

Reply

skooks
+2 Mike Ferrentino Hardlylikely

I share the same age and attitude as you do. Ride for fun and appreciate every day I get out of bed. I'm very aware that health/fitness/physical ability are on the decline, and finding that I have an almost manic need to get out and do things as often as possible while I am still capable of doing so.  Time is the most precious resource I have, and I intend to spend it  having as much fun as possible.

Reply

gdharries
+2 Curveball Muesliman

Oh wow, I’d buy a book for sure. I still have well-loved copies of Bike magazines from the early 90s with your writing in them. Please do.

Reply

Curveball
+1 Muesliman

I'd order a book of your essays immediately after release. I remember reading through my issues of Bike for decades and saving Grimy Handshake for the very end and when I would have some time available to really sink into it. It was like enjoying an amazing imperial stout at the end of a full day of riding.

Reply

craw
+9 Mammal mnihiser Velocipedestrian Carlos Matutes Matt Cusanelli Geof Harries Spencer Nelson bikedrd Curveball

I proper coffee table book would be pretty amazing. Each spread a big photo on one side and the essay on the right.

Reply

Roxtar
+8 Andy Eunson Cr4w BarryW mnihiser Carlos Matutes Skooks Hardlylikely Curveball

"why pretend? Just enjoy the scenery, click off the miles until the fun stuff happens, and keep enough gas in the tank to get a little rowdy on the descents."

Once again, summed up perfectly. 

Several years ago, a buddy asked how my new Nomad climbed.

"I climb at the same rate on an 18lb hardtail or a 40lb DH."

Reply

TristanC
+5 Offrhodes42 Mike Ferrentino ClydeRide taprider Andy Eunson

Is there a kind of bird that finishes marathon events out of pure spite? Maybe a Canada Goose?

Reply

mikeferrentino
+5 TristanC vunugu Hardlylikely tomis916 Curveball

When it comes to the bird analogies, this one was a bit of a failure - the ornithologists came for me in gaggles, flocks, parliaments, murders, or any other number of congregational descriptors to inform me that not only do Canadian geese log the big flight miles, but so do the DH ascribed swallows, along with the allegedly unspectacular starlings, and a passel of other birds ranging from hummingbirds to cranes, and that I basically knew nothing.

I won't pretend that I know what goes on in the mind of a bird. If spite can be a motivator. I have known some geese that are monumental assholes, though. And I've had run ins with parrots that had sharp beaks and mean streaks a mile wide. So I wouldn't rule it out...

Reply

denomerdano
+9 BarryW Lu Kz Mike Ferrentino turboshart Carlos Matutes Matt Cusanelli Spencer Nelson 93EXCivic Muesliman

Burds aren't real anyways

Reply

syncro
+4 Mike Ferrentino Timer Curveball Muesliman

Reply

velocipedestrian
+2 Andy Eunson Curveball

Given the geography of the marathon peddler, I nominate the Bar-tailed Godwit. Fun name for extra zhuzh. 

Reply

tim-lane
+3 BarryW Mike Ferrentino vunugu

Reply

Koelschejung
+5 Mike Ferrentino taprider Andy Eunson NealWood Timer

"refugees from the Disney wardrobe design Department" thanx for that:-)

Reply

taprider
+5 Mike Ferrentino Skooks Hardlylikely tomis916 Curveball

"I suspect this elemental gloriousness is going to be something that becomes lost to most of us as we opt to ingest the hidden boost of electric assist, but damn, to be able to wind this thing up so fast, under my own power, and so easily go straight into my own red zone? That is a beautiful thing."

"...winding that damn thing up and pinning it until the entire horizon dissolved in a red haze"

Wonderful writing and poetic

I get the feeling like I'm looking into a mirror when I read your stuff Mike (XC red mist and age wise, but not writing ability)

Reply

andy-eunson
+4 taprider Cr4w Mike Ferrentino Curveball

Yeah man. We are triplets. Many of us older folks start to realize it’s the journey not the destination with the sports we do. Having fun, not getting hurt, looking down and and around  seeing things rather than staring at a pulse monitor. Riding what we own rather than lusting for the "next big thing" brings more happiness. I see people maybe 20 years younger than me fairly often who seem to be trying for something all the time. They don’t look happy. I think some are trying hard to not admit that they are aging. You cannot win that fight. It is inevitable. To me it seems undignified. I don’t want to be that woman who came to every cross country race in Ontario when I lived and raced there who won every event. She was also dead last in every event being the only one in her age category. It was not like she was a good rider either. She was slow and unskilled and never improved. I raced veteran and masters for a while but when the numbers of us dwindled I saw it as kind of pointless. It was liberating to quit racing. But there are still remnants of my competitive nature in me. But today it’s more like a little anger when I get passed on the trail by a somewhat younger rider. And I hate that feeling in me. But it’s less frequent that I feel that way now. I can admire the the rider’s abilities now  or xc skier’s skills. That is healthier mentally. 

Why did we race at all? For me I think it was firstly a love of riding and racing brought together like minded people. A clan if you will. I raced and trained and did well enough to be accepted into the clan. Many realized at some point that they weren’t good at xc racing so they went to freeride. Racing was too competitive they said. But freeriding was just as competitive but with no medals. Trying to one up each other was also a fun thing to do. The competition was still there but hidden and perhaps more dangerous. 

But I still like the feeling of riding a fast bike. I don’t like wearing what look like Danny Van Norman’s orthopaedic shoes he wore in 7th grade. Lycra clothes still work well for me but I have lots of fat camouflage baggy clothes too.

Reply

ClydeRide
+3 Mike Ferrentino LWK tomis916

As a 215 lb rider with a diesel pulmonary system that has never exceeded 170bpm, your HR terrifies me.

Reply

mikeferrentino
+5 ClydeRide Skooks tomis916 Curveball Todd Hellinga

Yeah, but, your resting HR is probably in the low 40s, which terrifies me as much as it fills me with envy.

Reply

ClydeRide
+2 Mike Ferrentino tomis916

It’s true. I’m often only about 42 beats north of death.

Reply

FlipSide
+1 Mike Ferrentino

I'm in a similar situation. I am 47 y.o. and I always have a super high heart rate. 

For me, any climb on a ride requiring a significant effort will bring me over 180bpm right away. Basically, reaching over 180bpm is totally unavoidable for me on any ride...and I really must avoid going over 190bpm. 

This means I have a very narrow range of usable heart rate and I hit the red line constantly. As a result, I must take it easy on the climbs and trying to keep up with super fit fast climbers is simply out of the question for me. It will invariably endup with me hitting my cardio-vascular ceiling very quickly and needing a break.  

Not sure this is an upside or not, but one thing I noticed is that I can hit my suffer zone several time in a ride without issue. I simply need to catch my breath and I am good to go. It seems many people can have their ride almost ruined if they go too high on the HR. (I am not an expert on this matter, so maybe this is a false impression.)

Reply

fartymarty
+1 Muesliman

Now you just have to stick those silly light wheels on the Starling and see what it'll do....

Reply

mikeferrentino
+3 ClydeRide Carlos Matutes Curveball

Sigh. My wild ass guess would be "not much." Rotational mass is definitely part of the equation. But no matter how you dress up the Starling, it'll never be an XC rocket. A bird of an entirely different feather, if you will. I bought it specifically because it is a bike that I have zero desire to try and morph into something it is not. I love it just the way it is, for what it is.

Reply

fartymarty
+1 Curveball

I've light-tyred my Murmur and it's quick (I've not ridden an XC bike since the 90s so have nothing recent to compare to) and certainly keeps you honest in the way down.  I've also played around with different fork travels from 120*-170 and it's quite a versatile bike for what it is.  160 is my happy place tho.  Glad you're enjoying it.

*with 120ish rear.

Reply

cxfahrer
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Brilliant! You are the Guy de Maupassant of mountainbiking prose. 

Regarding the heart rate, how about some beta blockers? About 150, that's it (200 when I was in my 40s).

Reply

mikeferrentino
+2 Andy Eunson Hardlylikely

Thing is, in spite of my high heart rate, I do not have high blood pressure. Or that's what my doctor keeps telling me. As a frame of reference, the lowest my resting pulse ever got was somewhere in the high 50s. It has been a couple years since my last physical, but every time I've been checked by a doctor, they've shrugged and said everything appears normal. However, when reading that the generally accepted max heart rate for someone my age is 161, pinning it in the 180s is not something I am eager to do so much anymore.

Also, as a frame of reference, I sometimes would race 'cross with a heart rate monitor. It was rare that my heart rate would dip below 180 at any point from the start, and would usually peak somewhere around 193. 23 years ago, mind you.

Finally, something I didn't think through until I was done writing this piece - outside temperature. In spite of my protestations of not having high blood pressure, I turn red real easily and do not deal well with heat. I took this ride later in the day, and in hotter conditions than usual. And I was probably sub-optimally hydrated. Both of those factors could have contributed. So, time to go again, fully hydrated, earlier in the day, and see what the numbers do.

Reply

cxfahrer
+1 Mike Ferrentino

I have a fairly normal blood pressure, but as a tall and lanky guy (6'7", 200lbs) I got some bradycardial LAF problems about 15years ago (near 50 then), and have to take betablockers and Flecainid. 

Side effect is that low max heart rate, which can be quite frustrating and a bit dangerous especially when it's hot and I am dehydrated. 

My doctor did see something in my EKG 15yrs ago, and sent me to do a max heartrate/powermeter test at the local university sports medical center. But at max everything was fine - it was only when doing low intensities and being a little tired that those LAFs started, e.g. when packing the bike into the car after a long hot day and 50kms highway to drive home, barely able to breathe and sit in the car...Once I went to ER with a low heart rate of about 35, going down, luckily the alarm sign of their monitor went on and they saved me.. 

Always better to do regular check-ups to find out what could go wrong.

Reply

Roxtar
+1 Mike Ferrentino

30 years ago, max was 190bpm. Today (at 63) it's down to165 but my BP is oddly low. Stand up too fast and fall down quickly, low. Cardiologist recommending more bacon, low.

During my brief stint of endurance racing, I developed my "sit-n-spin" method of climbing that has aged perfectly with me.

Reply

Curveball
0

Mike, the best way to stay hydrated is to live and ride in Washington. Your body will be nearly constantly soaked and you can just turn your head skyward if you get thirsty.

Reply

LWK
+1 Mike Ferrentino

per the other comments, turns out "normal" HR is widely variable from one individual to the next.  I'm in the low camp.  I think the highest value I ever saw was 175.  I was young and fit and that was after killing myself on a 10km+ climb.  I could get my resting HR down early 40s with just sitting on the couch for a few min.  I did a TON of pedalling/fitness riding back then.  Now, at 53y, my overnight resting HR is still ~40 but getting it much above 150 is a major chore.

Funny story. I ended up in the Emerg Dept with what turned out to be a kidney stone about a year ago. The monitors went crazy as my BP was thru the roof (thx to the pain) AND my HR was intermittently dipping below 40bpm.  The poor nurse couldnt figure out WTF was going on and thought I needed to go see cardiology...

Reply

kos
+1 Curveball

Long-time reader of your work, starting with Bike stuff.

Your best closing paragraph ever!

Do the book while you can. Sadly, Super Hunky did not.

Reply

mikeferrentino
+1 Kos

Monkey Butt? The Strange Tale Of The Phantom Duck Of The Desert? The Last Ride? The Hunk wrote some books. Not exactly Faulkner, but he scribbled some stuff out into the world.

Reply

syncro
+1 Mike Ferrentino

In terms of the HR chatter, don't forget that your heart is only one part of your cardiovascular system and only one part of what contributes to your HR and BP. There are a number of changes going on in our bodies as we age that contribute  to what our hearts may be tasked with. Arterial condition, lung capacity and things like the number/condition of mitochondria in our muscle cells can affect how hard our hearts may have to work to push enough oxygenated blood to meet the demand. And of course individual genetic differences and our lifestyles (fitness) also affect things. If a high heart rate, especially during exercise, is a concern it might be worth talking to your doctor about going for a graded exercise test which is done in a lab. You could also do your own field test, but only if you already know you have a healthy heart  - you don't want to give yourself a jammer trying to find out what your upper limit is. If your physician has said you  are good to go in terms of heart health there are a few different reliable ways to find your Max HR if you have an HR monitor. 

https://marathonhandbook.com/how-to-calculate-max-heart-rate/

Reply

mikeferrentino
+1 Mark

I gotta admit, the 187 peak the other day wasn't too alarming the first couple times it spiked, but then when it sat up there and didn't want to recover in what I would parse as a "normal" window, I had some cause for concern. Since then, I went and replicated the route, but in temperatures about 15 degrees (f) cooler, and with attentive hydration beforehand. Peak was 174, low was 73, average for the ride was 141. Recovery from each time I peaked into the 170s was quick, even soft pedaling it was easy to recover back below 150 in a minute or two. Resting rate for the past three days has been 63. 

So, my working hypothesis, derived from decades of popping like a champagne cork whenever the weather is hot and I am tasked with pedaling hard, is that I have a body heat management threshold that is low. As in, if the ambient air temperature is 80 or higher, or humid, I can expect that my heart rate is going to run 10-20bpm higher in all zones for a given output as a result of trying to cool down my overheating body. Especially if I am not super hydrated. Double especially if I am wearing any clothing at all.

Nevertheless, I am "a man of a certain age", and it has been a few years since my last full-on physical. I know a cardiologist down in La Paz, and he is willing to do a full cyclical stress test along with echocardiogram imaging for less than I would need to shell out for a copay up north. May as well find a urologist while I'm at it, since I got sidelined for TWO WHOLE YEARS trying to schedule that appointment during the pandemic. Cue up loooong rant about the absolute shittiness of health care in the US.

Reply

syncro
+1 Mike Ferrentino

Well shit, at that rate you might as well go full meal deal and get a bend over and cough test done too. 

If you don’t fare well in heat, that easily adds to the stress on your heart.  If you’re dehydrated, that makes it even worse as your blood thickens which makes it harder to pump and bumps HR even more. It’s like a cascade effect.  I learned a while back that any pedaling in heat lasting much over an hour requires significant hydration and/or intensity at 70% or less otherwise HR and BR can spike pretty easily.

Reply

Ceecee
0

Algo Cañón

Reply

taprider
0

Rockrider? 

Not Pivot though since it is not flex stay

Reply

Ceecee
0

This comment has been removed.

mnihiser
0

Scott Spark is my guess

Reply

Ceecee
0

Finally a Scott with a twist-lockout

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.