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Uncle Dave Reviews Ripley

2020 Ibis Ripley - Long Term Review

Words Dave Tolnai
Photos Dave Tolnai
Date Oct 29, 2019

I'm not going to dilly dally around the details or the specifications or the abstraction of leading into this review with some kind of fancy introduction. The Ibis Ripley fuckin' rips. Wouldn't it be great if we could leave it there?

The Ascent

I'm not the most enthusiastic climber, but lately I find I am climbing at a faster clip than usual. Yes, some of that is related to this bicycle, but it also seems to have carried over to the other bikes that I ride. This bike has no problem with any hill that you want to throw at it, and it seems that has consequences on things like "fitness" and "endurance" and whatnot.

When I first hopped on this bike, it didn't feel like an uphill rocket. But after riding a few other bikes, that initial impression was a bit misplaced. More than that though, it's a master of the technical climb. I'll go so far as to say something like "this bike is the best technical climbing bike that I have ever ridden." It's light, it pedals well, and the geometry puts you in just the right position to calmly motor up anything. I seldom felt the need to get out of the saddle for anything. As long as you can keep the cranks spinning and your ass planted, chances are pretty good you will make it up the thing you are trying to climb. Maybe there is something to this steep seattube thing?

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This was me standing in the woods thinking "I guess I need a bike shot for the review." A Dave Smith special, it is not.

The Descent

As I alluded to in the intro, this bike is a lot of fun. The geometry is a great balance of not too steep/not too slack, and everything is in just the right place. If you find the right trail, there's not much more that you could hope for than to be on this bike. Smooth and turny is what you wind up looking for, and this bike is more-or-less perfect once you find it. If you find where you can string a few corners together, it will leap from one to the other with a surprising amount of...zing? The geometry feels just about ideal for most of the things I want to do on a bike.

Where it works best is on a trail that you can finesse and work and pump and caress. As long as you can keep your body moving in time to react to the trail, the bike will make you extremely happy. And it is so, so precise. Everything screams of stiffness and it gives you an ability to put this bike on any line of your choice.

This bike also does surprisingly well on the steep and technical, partially because of that precision. The large wheels and the ability to put them exactly where you want them makes up for the limited amount of travel. Of course you're probably not going to be able to charge the big moves like you would on a burlier bike, but I was consistently surprised by how well things went on steeper trails. I generally found myself walking away due to my mental capabilities vs. anything related to the bike.

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I know this isn't the greatest photo, but I used the better one from this corner in my Gore review. I tried a few different things, but a chipmunk kept setting off my camera trigger, so I gave up after a few tries. Seriously.

And this is where things get confusing. This is a light bike that climbs quickly. It also has the geometry to carry you down most things at a fast, fun and enjoyable clip. But...It's almost like the bike has the ability to get itself in over its head. My first thought was that, "it's capable of writing cheques that the suspension can't cash." But that feels a bit unfair, and comes across as a criticism of the suspension, which is not what is intended. I thought both ends worked quite well. I quickly found comfortable settings and wouldn't hope for much more out of 120mm in the rear and 130mm in the front.

What I mean is that I found myself able to ride this bike at a speed that overpowered my body. So a better analogy is (hold on for a super up to date cultural reference) that scene from Forrest Gump where (spoiler alert) he's running along in his leg braces and he eventually starts running so fast that his leg braces explode off his body. That's the perfect analogy, where the bike is Forrest Gump, and I'm the exploding leg braces.

In fact, at times during the testing period I found myself wondering if I'd finally reached the point in my life where I was standing at the abyss, staring into a downward spiral of physical degradation. I'd get to the bottom of a trail and I'd feel like I had been absolutely worked. On fast and rough trails, I'd start out with gusto, then have to back off a bit and it would feel like I was hitting every bump and finding every hole, and I couldn't ride slowly enough to make the pain go away. Under a younger, stronger, better specimen of a human being, this might not be a problem. This bike would be the perfect second bike to my 20-something self that rode a DH bike all the time. But my old self started looking for ways to take the edge off.

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Consistently taking travel just about as far as possible without hitting bottom.

The first step was to make sure I was using every mm of suspension travel. I took a couple of tokens out of the fork, and I played around with air pressures until I was regularly using most of the travel. The rear end has good bottom out resistance which made this pretty easy on the rear (Ibis would only go as far as saying "progressive all the way through") and you can tune this fork to do most things. This ended up putting me almost bang on with the recommended sag and settings in the rear, and a bit softer than recommend pressure on the fork (but under recommended sag).

Next was to swap the tires over to the optional spec Maxxis Assegai 2.5 WT Exo+'s. I thought these might add a bit more give over the slightly narrower Schwalbes that the bike was delivered with, but the effect was pretty marginal. The increase in traction though, was not. Assegais are certainly a grippy tire, and made sticking a line much more certain. I was also surprised by how much 'notchier' they felt, especially on turn initiation, but I never regretted trading a bit of rolling resistance for a tonne of grip.

From there, I started using my imagination on what I might do to soften things up a bit if I owned this bike. Longer travel fork? Plus-ish sized rubber? Aluminum wheels? My worry would be that any changes might take away from the things that make this bike great. When I discussed these things with Ibis their suggestion was always "you should just buy a Ripmo if that's what you're looking for. Their weights aren't that much different, and they both pedal really well." This sounds like fair advice.

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This was a particularly grippy day. Bike and tires make for happy cornering.

Ibis Ripley Spec Details

Maxxis Assegais

After the second or third ride, Ibis was kind enough to send me a set of their optional spec Assegais. I already talked about these above. You should go for this option.

Shimano XTR

Over the course of this review, I hopped back and forth between this bike and several others equipped with the latest from SRAM. My thoughts? Well, I think SRAM has Shimano licked right now on the shifter game. I appreciate the multiple ways that you can pull a Shimano trigger shifter, but other than that, I much, much prefer the feel of SRAM. SRAM shifts with a firm, single click that feels very intentional. On the other hand, Shimano shifters feel a teensy bit vague. There's a bit of free play that feels a bit sloppy to me. I wish they would change this.

But, other than that, this new XTR is difficult to wrap your head around. The first few times you shift going up a hill, it almost feels like something has gone wrong because the shift is so fast and silent. I've never been much of a "shifting under load" guy, but it becomes a silly thing to have worried about with the new XTR. Hopping back onto another drivetrain, it's kind of shocking how slow and loud things get unless you back all the way off your pedals. This is the new standard for shifting.

On the brake end, I talked a bit about the brakes in the first look. My opinion hasn't changed much. In a perfect world, this bike would come with the 4 piston version. I always felt like I could have used just a bit more bite.

Lizard Skins Grips

These grips are sooooooo grippy. I like them a fair amount, although I feel like I've had to repair quite a few glove seams over the last few months.

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Those little alternating diamonds are super grippy. I didn't think much of them when I first looked at them, but these are some really great grips that hold on tight.

BikeYoke Revive Dropper

I only had to "revive" the BikeYoke Revive dropper once when I pulled it out of the shipping box. Other than that, not a peep.

Stem and Bar

Ibis wanted me to note that stock bikes are shipped with Enve stems and bars, not the Ibis stuff that you see here.

WTB Silverado Saddle

This is a very comfortable saddle.

Bottom line

The 2020 Ibis Ripley is a great bike that you can ride really fast and have a lot of fun on, especially if you're strong enough to take some punishment. I have more dollars worth of bikes in my storage shed right now than I have ever had in my life, and this is the one that I'm reaching for each and every day (almost). It'll get you to the top pretty quickly, and it has the handling to do most things on the way down. It would be a really great pedally bike for a person used to riding longer travel bikes. Or a great descendy bike for somebody used to riding XC bikes. Or the perfect bike for somebody looking to have a lot of fun on some day long epics. Or a pretty good all rounder for somebody who likes to climb a lot. Or a great do-it-all bike for somebody that lives in a land of mellower trails. Or...shit...I don't know. I'm sure most people can come up with a scenario where this bike might work for them.

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Comments

DaveSmith
+1 Shinook Cooper Quinn Pnwpedal
Dave Smith  - Oct. 28, 2019, 10:27 p.m.

Dave. Your cornering face - It's a thing. Best, Dave.

Reply

Jolly_X_Roger
+3 Bavaria 2.0 rolly Dan Beau Miller Pnwpedal
Jolly_X_Roger  - Oct. 28, 2019, 10:53 p.m.

I cannot be the only one wanting to read the Ripmo sequel to this review, can I?

Probably does not have to be a long term one either to give an answer to the question is it what you are looking for.

Reply

aaronufl
0 Beau Miller Pnwpedal
Aaron Croft  - Oct. 29, 2019, 5:38 a.m.

I have to agree. Of all the bikes I’ve ridden in recent memory, I have the most fun on the Ripley. It’s surprisingly capable and adaptable. I picked up a second wheel set to run 2.3 tires for more pedal-y rides and slap on my current wheel set with 2.6 tires for chunkier trails and the occasional bikepacking trip. Short of sustained technical downhills, this bike is a real winner and I grab it for 95% of my riding these days.

Reply

Shinook
+3 Timer Dan Niels Jan AJ Barlas Aaron Croft Pnwpedal
Shinook  - Oct. 29, 2019, 6:01 a.m.

"it's capable of writing cheques that the suspension can't cash."

IMO that's the biggest catch with the current crop of trailbikes. I rode a Smuggler for a little over a year and that's how I describe it. The geometry of the bike exudes stability at speed and provides great control, especially coming from prior gen 29er geo, but the suspension just can't keep up with the way the bike wants to ride especially on really loose, chunky stuff. You find the limits of that 120 really quickly unless you are really light. Despite a multitude of shocks and forks, I just couldn't get the suspension performance I wanted out of it, despite the geometry feeling great.

Reply

jan
+1 Dan Shinook Pnwpedal
Jan  - Oct. 29, 2019, 9:31 a.m.

This echos my experience on an "SBG" smuggler as well... 3 shocks, 2 forks, and an angleset over a year and I eventually said F it.

Reply

fartymarty
+1 Shinook
fartymarty  - Oct. 29, 2019, 12:05 p.m.

What did you move onto?

Reply

Shinook
0
Shinook  - Oct. 29, 2019, 12:56 p.m.

I went with a Sentinel, but I considered a few others. The main driver for the Sentinel compared to the SJ EVO, Ripmo, and others available at the time was the same reach angle and suspension performance. I had been told and read that the suspension performance of the Ripmo and SJ Evo felt more like a big trailbike than an enduro bike, that the Sentinel tracked better. I take a while to adjust to new bikes and found the transition to the Sentinel fairly simple.

If it had been available at the time, the new Enduro would have been another one I'd strongly have considered.

Reply

dan
+1 Shinook
Dan  - Oct. 29, 2019, 9:28 p.m.

How's the Sentinel been holding up for you? A friend of mine picked one up late early this year and has struggled with out of spec seat tube diam, premature bearing wear, and something with the rocker.

Reply

Shinook
+3 Alex D Dan Jerry Willows
Shinook  - Oct. 30, 2019, 7:23 a.m.

I like the way the bike rides a lot, it's not as cumbersome or bulky as I expected coming from the Smuggler and it handles just about everything I throw at it really well. It tracks well, remains playful, and corners really well.

I hate to say anything negative about Transition because their support for me has always been fantastic, their warranty turnaround is very quick and they are always quick to answer questions, but...

Their bikes are a chore to maintain. My Smuggler went through THREE sets of lower main bearings in one year. Removal of the bearing was a nightmare because of the galvanic bond formed between the stainless bearing and alloy inserts and a lack of enough grease/antiseize. I constantly had bolts backing out or loosening.

My Sentinel has been worse. In the span of 3-4 rides, my lower mains seized entirely and had to be flushed/freed. The rocker link bearings backed out of their shell and I had to press them back in with a retaining compound. My lower triangle cracked around the insert for the axle threads, but was promptly replaced by Transition (<1 week turnaround including shipment).

The problem with their bearings is twofold. First, the bearings themselves seem real inconsistent in quality. I've opened up some that were full of grease and remained smooth for months, but mine looked like someone swiped their finger through some grease and through the bearing, then sealed it, because there was only grease on maybe 20% of the diameter of the bearing. The rest was bone dry.

The other is their exposure, especially the lower main that is exposed to all the gunk kicked up by the tire. There is no seal or cover of it like Santa Cruz or other brands, which means the only thing keeping dirt out is the bearing seal, which doesn't do a great job. IME, it's not the water that's the problem, it's the dirt and debris.

I work around this by servicing them on a monthly basis. I disassemble the link, remove the bearing seal and pack them with marine bearing grease. I then reassemble with Loctite 243 and let it cure. The Loctite keeps the bolts from backing out, which is good, but bearing life is still somewhat mixed. Packing them yourself definitely expands their life but is kindof a chore.

My other big gripe is a lack of internally tubed routing on a 3000 USD frame. Everyone else in that price range has elegant routing inside the frame. The fact I have to fish it out with a pick is abysmal in such an expensive frame.

Timer
+1 Shinook
Timer  - Oct. 30, 2019, 12:41 a.m.

Probably a good choice, since many reports indicate that the stumpy Evo suffers even more from a mismatch between geo and suspension.

Reply

fartymarty
+1 Dan
fartymarty  - Oct. 30, 2019, 3:26 a.m.

The Sentinel is in a similar ball park geowise to my overforked (160mm) Starling Murmur.  I have only been on it for 6 months and it copes with most things probably with the exception of really rough / rocky trails but this could be the forks or rear shock being out of their depth rather than the amount of travel.

Geo v Travel is an interesting debate - should the geo match travel or do short travel bikes with progressive geo work?  I think I'm coming around to geo matching travel and there is a progression from XC bike to DH bike.

Reply

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Oct. 30, 2019, 3:26 a.m.

The Sentinel is in a similar ball park geowise to my overforked (160mm) Starling Murmur.  I have only been on it for 6 months and it copes with most things probably with the exception of really rough / rocky trails but this could be the forks or rear shock being out of their depth rather than the amount of travel.

Geo v Travel is an interesting debate - should the geo match travel or do short travel bikes with progressive geo work?  I think I'm coming around to geo matching travel and there is a progression from XC bike to DH bike.

Reply

dan
0
Dan  - Oct. 30, 2019, 7:53 p.m.

Reflecting on these comments, I wonder if the common denominator is that we have an innate desire to avoid being under-biked. My Slash is my do-it-all bike simply because its abilities cover the full range of the riding I might do on any given day in the NW. Sure, everyone wants a +1 bike, and even if I could afford it, I can't really imagine choosing the 120mm travel bike a whole lot when the burly Slash is hanging right next to it. Even if I'm lugging around an extra pound or two over a appropriately-spec'd but shorter travel rig, I like the insurance policy of a Lyrik and Maxxis WTs.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Nov. 2, 2019, 10:38 p.m.

Not for me - an Optic for Chilcotin trail and a Sight for Whistler. Never scared to take the smaller bike out when the trails warrant it. That said my 'smaller' bike is still built with a Lyrik rather than a Pike, and both bikes are running Code RSC with 200 mm front and 180 mm rear.

Reply

kos
0 Beau Miller Pnwpedal
Kos  - Oct. 29, 2019, 7:12 a.m.

Great (and fun) review.  This bike might top my list for a one bike quiver.  You might want to check out the fourth sentence for a missing "not".

Reply

simenf
-1 Beau Miller Tadpoledancer Pnwpedal
Simen Filseth  - Oct. 29, 2019, 9:05 a.m.

I think Dave nails it in this review.

I have a v1 Ripley with a Cane Creek Inline air damper and a Pike fork. I have ridden all of the different versions over the years, and also the Ripley v4 at a weekend demo event this June. Rode it with both the standard tires (NN) and the Ripmo tires (DHF/Aggressor) on the same trails on the same days, just to make sure the tires weren't playing a trick on me. Tires make a huge difference for the bike feel. Then I rode the Ripmo on the same trails (yes, they were great trails) in the same conditions. With the same tires, it feels damn close to the Ripley going up, but som much more FUN going down. Even with beefier tires the Ripmo is really great allround bike.

I came away a bit unimpressed with the standard suspension performance of the Ripley, especially on the downhills. The suspension design itself, which is familiar and solid, makes it so easy to push beyond the limits of the CTD and the F34. Even when bouncing off the stops the bike is still super composed, but leaves you wanting for more. The Ripley just deserves way more capable suspension units (Ibis, do you read me? How about DVO Sapphire 34/Topaz, or Lyrik/Super Deluxe as an options on the Ripley?).

Ripley and Ripmo are close, so that you can pick the best for your riding, but not risk to go wrong.

Reply

rolly
+1 Dan
rolly  - Oct. 30, 2019, 6:46 a.m.

Norco took that approach with their Optik, by putting a beefy shock on it.  The reviews have been very good.  I wonder if this would benefit the Ripley.

Reply

Pnwpedal
+1 Dan Beau Miller Jan
Pnwpedal  - Oct. 29, 2019, 9:20 a.m.

We've definitely gotten to an interesting point with geometry where a bike can ride almost too well in certain situations. I doubt we'll go past 77-78° on the seat tube, and I think that's even pushing it a bit. Head tubes are pretty set now at 64-65° for Enduroing™ (with the requisite short offset fork) and 66-67° for normal trail riding. Add some long reach and a moderately low BB and viola, you have a bike that rides really really well. My only concern would be efficiency for climbing, which seems to be echoed by the current best climbing bikes not having most extremely modern geometry.

"That's the perfect analogy, where the bike is Forrest Gump, and I'm the exploding leg braces."

This made me smile. I always enjoy your reviews Dave.

Reply

Hepcat
0
Beau Miller  - Oct. 29, 2019, 10:07 a.m.

Steep seat angles are a bit of trade-off though, as it shortens your seated reach considerably.

Reply

Pnwpedal
0
Pnwpedal  - Oct. 29, 2019, 1:13 p.m.

I agree, but I personally prefer a bit more reach and a bit less seat-to-bars distance.

Reply

Dude@
0
Dude@  - Oct. 29, 2019, 10:44 a.m.

I got a Ripley V4, when it first came out. First Ibis does a lot of things right, simply frame layout, can install long dropper, water bottle, its relatively light, internal routing is easy. Not a big fan of Ibis colors or graphics.

It's a down right fun bike! At one point, I was considering going back to 27.5 wheels to have a bit more fun, as I was missing certain riding aspects. This bike changed my thoughts. It is very fun for a 29er. Though I never rode BMX, I refer to this as my BMX 29er.  

I agree with Dave. Its a true "trail" bike and works best when you keep it in its lane. Many trail bikes blur the line into AM and in doing so take some of the fun away. The travel, stiffness, lightness, etc - keep the bike more on edge which is rewarding to ride on regular trails. I don't grab this bike for riding more aggressive (I have, but) as I find it not as enjoyable. 

I also notice with the Ripley geometry (can't explain why) that I ride it in more a new school approach - i.e. over the front.  This is part of the equation that makes it fun.

Reply

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Oct. 29, 2019, 12:09 p.m.

Has anyone tried a good coil shock on a shorter travel bike like this?  It would be interesting to see how it rode with something like a Storia

Reply

Shinook
+2 Dan RBWebb
Shinook  - Oct. 29, 2019, 12:59 p.m.

I've had a DBCoil IL on a Smuggler. 

It makes the bike track better and climb better, for sure, but it puts you in this weird spot where the suspension wants to soak up the trail but lacks the travel to do so. I found myself faster on air shocks, which would have more of a tendency to "skip" over features/bumps/etc than it would attempt to absorb them. It felt like the bike would fall into holes or get snagged more than with air due to the suspension movement. The coil also made the bike feel more dead, which meant unweighting the bike to smooth out the trail was a bit more work even with a higher spring rate and less rebound damping. 

It's not a bad feel necessarily, but I think it tries to make the bike do something it's not meant to do and deadens the ride too much.

Reply

joseph-crabtree
0
Joseph Crabtree  - Oct. 29, 2019, 3:44 p.m.

I've got a 18' Smuggler that is "overshocked",swapped the Fox 210x50 with a CCDBiL Coil 210x55 to get another 12mm of travel.Kind of a Mini-Sentinel with the fork bumped to 150.With the stock setup I was beating myself up, like Dave said "absolutely worked".Now the bike feels awesome and I don't think it feels "dead" at all.

I think a 50mm stroke coil shock would run out of travel before the spring rate can rise enough to prevent bottom outs without over-springing.I did install a big/soft bottom out bumper but it wasn't needed.

Reply

Marcofrommonaco
0
Marcofrommonaco  - Oct. 31, 2019, 11:08 p.m.

I was thinking of doing the same to my Smuggler. Do you have the alloy version? And you had no problems of collision with the rocker/seattube/tire interface?

Reply

LWK
+3 Tadpoledancer Saša Stojanovic JVP
LWK  - Oct. 29, 2019, 12:53 p.m.

sorry if I am a bit daft but I dont quite follow the comments re shifting.  "... SRAM has Shimano licked in the shifting game.." but then XTR "...is the new standard for shifting".  So you like the SRAM feel but the Shimano actually works better?

Reply

kiwizak
+3 LWK Tadpoledancer Dan
kiwizak  - Oct. 29, 2019, 1:52 p.m.

"SRAM has Shimano licked right now on the shifter (not "shifting") game"

Which I interpret as Dave likes the SRAM shifter better, because the XTR shifter feels vague. But like the overall shifting of XTR betterer.

Reply

davetolnai
+3 LWK Tadpoledancer Cam McRae
Dave Tolnai  - Oct. 29, 2019, 5:46 p.m.

Bingo.

Reply

earleb
0
earle.b  - Oct. 29, 2019, 3:37 p.m.

" In fact, at times during the testing period I found myself wondering if I'd finally reached the point in my life where I was standing at the abyss, staring into a downward spiral of physical degradation. I'd get to the bottom of a trail and I'd feel like I had been absolutely worked. On fast and rough trails, I'd start out with gusto, then have to back off a bit and it would feel like I was hitting every bump and finding every hole, and I couldn't ride slowly enough to make the pain go away. Under a younger, stronger, better specimen of a human being, this might not be a problem. This bike would be the perfect second bike to my 20-something self that rode a DH bike all the time. But my old self started looking for ways to take the edge off."

An easy fix. 

Mtb dryland with Bond training. http://www.bondtraining.ca/#train-smart

Reply

davetolnai
+4 Timer twk Jolly_X_Roger Dan
Dave Tolnai  - Oct. 29, 2019, 5:48 p.m.

You probably tell people we can fix this whole “global warming” thing too...using a mix of regulation, ingenuity and self sacrifice...

Note...sarcasm.

Reply

fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Oct. 30, 2019, 3:32 a.m.

...or ride a rigid bike.  Then you know what being "absolutely worked" feels like.  It makes you appreciate your bouncy bike.

Reply

dbozman
0
dbozman  - Oct. 31, 2019, 5:09 a.m.

Interesting review. Thank you. I was in a similar position a few months back. Sold my original Ripmo earlier in the year and was riding the new Hightower. Didn't care for that bike and was ready to return to Ibis. LBS here in Phoenix had both the Ripmo and the Ripley in XL.

I ended up going with another Ripmo, but that new Ripley has been in my head; particularly set up with a Pike at 140 and  a better shock (DVO will build you a Topaz with the proper stroke). Some of the most fun I've had is on short travel bikes riding big chunk on South Mountain (looking at you Banshee Phantom and the new Giant Trance).

Reply

UFO
0
UFO  - Oct. 31, 2019, 1:57 p.m.

"it's capable of writing cheques that the suspension can't cash."

That's an interesting concept for me as a primarily hardtail rider. Similar train of thought to Andrew's lack of concern in overforking FS bikes vs. overforking HT's.

Your Ripley review is timely as I'm considering moving to a 120 or 140mm FS primary bike. I guess what I'd be curious with is for you to spend similar time in a Ripmo and see how much it gives up on the flats and climbs given its weight is about the same, to cash in on 20mm more suspension. Just sweet talk Cam some and make it happen.

Reply

ManInSteel
0
ManInSteel  - Nov. 1, 2019, 1:13 p.m.

That's a great shoot at Deer John!  So Sick!

Reply

davetolnai
0
Dave Tolnai  - Nov. 4, 2019, 4:12 p.m.

Thanks!  I did them all with my new selfie rig.

Reply

alexdi
0
Alex D  - Nov. 2, 2019, 6:11 p.m.

Tested the XTR version of this one today. It's fast, poppy, and pedals well. Good to very good handling. It didn't have much small bump compliance, though, and I discovered that a lot of my confidence at speed comes from not getting jostled around over low roots and rocks. Absent that, it might as well be a heavy XC bike. I thought Yeti's SB130 platform was a considerably better balance of pedaling performance and responsiveness, though was ultimately smitten by the Trance 29's combination of lively handling and smooth ride for my local (bumpy, but not super gnarly) terrain.

Reply

laurelz11
0
laurelz11  - Nov. 3, 2019, 11:09 p.m.

I guess I'll have to work my way up to this bike. Not that strong/fit right now. I think I saw some people from my company ride this bike before.

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