Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (16).JPG
REVIEW | EDITORIAL

I Learned to Ride in Crappy Gear (and my Kid doesn't have to)

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major (Unless Noted)
Date Aug 13, 2021
Reading time

Two Cotton T's Please

My friend Seany-D used to ride up wearing one shirt, change it, and then ride down sweating out the second. Ryan had a system where he wore two at the same time. Apparently, it encouraged airflow. I always figured once I was wet, I was wet. But, it was impossible to even consider getting into Ryan's sister's little Mazda B-Series, borrowed after school, without swapping one cheap cotton T-shirt for another.

One time, riding in the snow, in the middle of nowhere, I hit a rock crossing a near-frozen pool of water up to my hub axles and fell over sideways. My elastomer-sprung cleats had fused themselves to my Speedplay Frog pedals and no amount of clicking my heels yelling "THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME!" was going to save me. A good reason to adventure with friends. In the aftermath, my clothes weighed as much as I did, and my shorts chaffed the skin off of me more than usual, as we booted up the climb trying to warm up.

To some extent, riding in heavy cotton shorts and then thick-and-heavy Cordura that took years to break in (but at least didn't soak up massive amounts of water) just comes down to not knowing any better. And let's face it, gear has come a long, long way since the days when I could eat a half-dozen honey crullers in a sitting without consequences. But what's incredible to me, as much as I've loved every era of mountain biking I've experienced, is that some folks actually think riding in shitty gear, on shitty bikes, is some kind of right-of-passage.

Clairebarian Bikes (2).JPG

We didn't jump straight to the good stuff. There were many, many rides in cheap cotton shorts, over torn tights, over my elbow pads, and sporting a t-shirt.

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (10).JPG

The combination of flexibility, durability, and breathability has been much appreciated by my grom. This Race Face Sendy kit has been climbed, crashed, and washed thoroughly.

Bikes have come a long way, in every price range, and gear certainly has as well. Great bicycle geometry is available at the entry-level of the sport, and the all-mountain hardtail you can get for 2-3k is downright amazing. It blows my mind how many folks I meet riding ten-year-old slag, that wasn't great when it was brand new, that are looking at repair bills that would get them halfway to an awesome rig - never mind what they paid to buy someone else's recycling in the first place.

The recipe for getting into mountain biking and loving it anywhere, isn't rocket surgery these days. And it's actually a lot less expensive than your buddy with a 15k AXS Megashduro-X makes it out to be. Pick up one of those hardtails with great geo and a solid parts package, and buy some good plastic pedals. Looking at most hardtails in the sub-3k price range, and especially the sub-2k price range, there's a good chance you may want to buy a tire or two once you sort things out. Either for more grip, or faster rolling, or sometimes both. But that's true of 10k+ bikes too.

What a 2021 Rocky Mountain Growler 40 is to a 2007 Slayer SXC, so too is a basic pair of current all-way flexible mountain bike shorts to any of the options, cycling brands or otherwise, that I came up wearing for mountain biking. Sure, I'm nostalgic for some of those old brands too, but compared to the textiles that are available today it's nice not dressing in the same sh*t my backpack was made from. So, in addition to bike and pedals, grab some decent footwear, a quality lid, a jersey that wicks and breaths (merino or synthetic), and get a pair of durable baggy shorts with some elasticity.

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

It's a simple fact that kids' stuff is cooler. The Sendy jersey, and matching gloves, was immediately the go-to for every ride.

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (14).JPG

Not the colour of shorts I would normally buy for my grom, but they still look great even after she's become entangled in her chain a couple times.

Get Sendy

I think it's clear that I, of all people, probably should not have been so surprised at what a huge difference good gear makes. And yet, as fast as kids grow, I was reluctant to spend on a 'proper' pair of cycling baggies for my child. Protective gear, absolutely! But, we were getting along fine with a pair of cotton shorts over some tights for quite a few months. Then the tights blew apart from crashing, and then the shorts became more than a little on the snug side. Now here we are in August, almost a year since my daughter really got into mountain bicycling, and she has a couple of pairs of Race Face Sendy shorts to her name.

And to be fair, no one I know who rides a lot is trying to make a go of it with just one pair of baggies. And no one I know who has worn a proper pair of multi-stretch bottoms is thinking that a pair of heavy cotton or denim shorts are going to cut it whether it's a wet ride, a hot ride, or really... the conditions don't even matter. I'm trying to balance access to gear with expectations. We're running a rigid 20" wheeled bike - and have zero second thoughts about that choice - and her 24" wheeled bike will certainly be a hardtail, and I know from here on out the shorts will be light, tough, and stretchy.

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (16).JPG

I know this isn't mind-blowing, but properly stretchy shorts are awesome for climbing. It's great that modern textiles can deliver flex and excellent durability too.

While there is an infinite selection of flexible, light, and durable baggy shorts for men and women, the kids' market is much newer and frankly a lot of the options aren't great for the investment. And it is indeed an investment, no different than buying soon-to-be-outgrown gear for any other sport or activity really. The Race Face kit we're using runs 60 USD | 80 CAD for the shorts, 45 USD | 60 CAD for the jersey, and 27 USD | 35 USD for the gloves*.

One difference with mountain biking, compared to say hockey, is that the gear that's required beyond a bike is basically a helmet and whatever protection is deemed necessary. No one has to buy any specific gear, and often it's possible to seek out less expensive alternatives that work pretty damned well. But after a fair number of rides, and a whole heck of a lot of bails, and looking at the condition of the gear we have, and with my kid's feedback, it was a very easy choice to pick up another pair of Sendy shorts (in black this time). We're confident we'll be handing them down to family once they're too small.

*I'm not really looking at the Sendy gloves here, but I'll note the quality has been excellent despite any number of crashes and I love that there's no velcro.

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (11).JPG

My kid has been progressing fantastically at her own pace and I don't want to make less of that by overselling the difference riding in good gear makes...

Race Face Sendy Kids NSMB AndrewM (12).JPG

...but, from power moves pedaling, to sustained standing descending, to getting untangled from the bike after a crash, it's all certainly made easier by some stretch.

As I'm certain you've experienced, it's been a difficult year for sourcing anything cycling-related. I've rediscovered the 2.4" DHR2 and I'm currently riding it as a front tire on two bicycles, I should be retiring my removable-chin-bar full-face helmet but can't get a replacement, and my kid's bike tires are near bald with no decent 20" rubber available anywhere. And I have it good, I'm regularly working on 1x12 mountain bikes with chains that flex almost as much laterally as they can pivot at the links.

At the last minute, before leaving for a little multi-day mountain bike adventure, I was stoked to find a second pair of Sendy shorts, black this time, available in a shop (Race Face has them on their website as well). My kid also absolutely loves her Sendy jersey. The colourway is called Mint. It's available in black as well, but the graphic option delivers a lot of "cool jersey!" and thumbs-up from our fellow travelers so it's an easy winner.

It also runs a lot cooler than a cotton T-shirt, or two, which brings me back to the point I've been trying to make; having been removed from truly junky gear for a long time, I had forgotten how much better mountain biking is with a good pair of shorts.

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Comments

Wapti
+3 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman Zero-cool
Wapti  - Aug. 13, 2021, 6:08 a.m.

The Kid's going to be sending it by the time she's 10.

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AndrewMajor
+2 Zero-cool AlanB
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 7:21 a.m.

The most amazing thing this year has been her progression climbing. She's becoming tenacious driving up bumps - which are a lot bigger on her 20" wheels than on my 29" hoops - to the point that she's cleaning sections I never would have guessed would be doable until the upsize to a 24" wheeled bike.

Never, ever, want them to get bigger, but it's going to be interesting at least when she makes the switch to the 24" in maybe November-ish.

Reply

craw
+6 Metacomet Andrew Major JVP Pete Roggeman mrbrett Tjaard Breeuwer
Cr4w  - Aug. 13, 2021, 6:11 a.m.

You probably don't appreciate how systematic your system is until you try to explain to a noob why you wear which combination of gear on which day.

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AndrewMajor
+2 Mammal Zero-cool
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 7:18 a.m.

Hahahahaha, trying to explain my waterproof vest to folks is the closest I'll ever come to doing guided tours of a modern art museum. 

Speaking of which, it finally, fully, shit the bed so it's time to sacrifice another jacket.

Reply

craw
+2 Andrew Major Tjaard Breeuwer
Cr4w  - Aug. 13, 2021, 11:23 a.m.

I'm about to finalize the fit for a custom sized Minimalist jacket from Made Outdoor - handmade goretex, made in Vancouver. I'm hoping it turns out great so I can get their bibs and Maximalist jacket for skiing.

https://madeoutdoor.ca/

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 11:33 a.m.

Oooooo. Can’t wait to see pictures!?!

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
+1 Andrew Major
Tjaard Breeuwer  - Aug. 17, 2021, 6 a.m.

Oh, thanks for the link!

as a tall skinny guy (6’5”, 172lbs) and father of tall, slender teen daughter (5’11”) I am always looking for custom sized outdoor gear!

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AndrewMajor
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2021, 8:16 a.m.

They, unfortunately, haven’t put any of their cycling-specific ideas into production, but as a tall slender dude definitely check out NAVAS for clothing in general, if you haven’t already. Made in Canada/Vancouver with some materials milled in Canada/Ontario. 

I am neither tall or slim but I own a few pieces (t-shirts, hoody, bamboo long sleeve) and the quality and feel are awesome.

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andrewbikeguide
+2 Andrew Major Cr4w
AndrewR  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:23 a.m.

I have been very impressed by my 7mesh cypress hydrid vest. Packs tiny and keeps the wind and spray off the core for the descents. It could be made better by having a hanging loop but other than that it is near perfect.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:41 a.m.

I’ll take a look, thanks. I always take my rain jacket with the most brutalized sleeves or worst fit and have it modified.

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Vikb
+1 Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - Aug. 13, 2021, 7:56 a.m.

Yeah! for quality gear.

Reply

IslandLife
+3 Grif Andrew Major Tjaard Breeuwer
IslandLife  - Aug. 13, 2021, 9:29 a.m.

Yep, my ten year olds have been riding proper "mountain bikes" since they were 4 and they both now shred pretty hard (for 10 year olds). I recently had to install a better narrow-wide chainring and chain guide on one of kids bikes because he was plowing pretty hard and started dropping his chain almost twice a trail!

I always hear/read "what, you're kids are 10 and riding FS bikes?! I started on blah blah blah blah." Ya, so did I and I would have given my left nut to be riding what my kids are riding now. But back then, there wasn't even an option and definitely not at the price points available now (especially the pre-covid used market), and now that I'm in a position where I don't have to give my left nut, why not?

Also... depending on your kids and the unique combination of their will/grit/temperament and your ability to push them an/or handle the bad moments... providing them with good gear and bikes can make a HUGE difference in their desire to ride and then everyone's enjoyment of what can be an insanely fun family sport/activity. Screw standing on the sidelines in the pouring rain of a boring soccer game or freezing your ass off on the wooden seats of a hockey arena... I would wayyyy rather be riding WITH my kids.

I had a light bulb moment a couple years ago at our local bike park when one of my sons broke something on his hardtail (24" Rocky Mountain Vertex). So we decided to shell out for a rental (24" Rocky Mountain Reaper)... the kid was instantly twice as fast, twice as comfortable and twice as happy. The next week I found a great deal on a used 24" FS bike for him and it's been amazing ever since.

Also, this is their sport. The same people that chide us for buying good gear and riding clothes for our kids turn around and have no problem dropping precious coin on high end hockey sticks, skates cleats, gear, clothing, training, tournament trips, etc, etc, etc... for their kids chosen sports... why does Mountain Biking always get hate for the same thing?

Anyway, my kids are kitted out in Fox jerseys, Raceface shorts, Sombrio gloves, Raceface knee pads, Gform elbow pads, Bell Super 2R fullface helmets and Ride Concepts shoes. They've both got full suspension bikes with proper drivetrains (range), dropper posts, and proper Crank Brothers Stamp 1 flat pedals. Because they're geared up properly and ready for anything, they're able to climb and descend comfortably and we're able to ride as a family in full confidence in our gear (not having to stop every 10 minutes to fix janky shit is a big plus) and have a great time!!

They're both racing in their first enduro races this weekend... and I've had to bow out in order to help see them through it... and I couldn't be happier!!

Go buy your kids cool shit, it's worth it.

PS. And yes, as they're getting older we're forming plans to split the costs of future bikes/gear etc... until they can take over buying their own stuff.

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AndrewMajor
+2 IslandLife Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 2:59 p.m.

Seeing families/kids/teens coming through the shop just reinforces my love of hardtails. The maintenance costs are way lower, the bikes are more adaptable, they last much longer, etc. I see so many roached FS bikes with huge repair bills, and recognize how capable hardtails (at least outside shuttling/bike park) that I can only recommend hardtails to most folks.

It’s not that I think my way is the only way, and I know multiple people with very nice FS bikes for their kids that they maintain as well as their own super bikes and I can totally appreciate that way of thinking.

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Vikb
+1 Andrew Major
Vik Banerjee  - Aug. 14, 2021, 11:48 a.m.

My FS bike needs a big service. I have all the parts, but I just keep grabbing a hardtail to ride and put off the FS maintenance. Maybe I'll get it done this winter so I can ride it next summer? My hardtails are so much fun and so capable I don't feel like I am missing out.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 IslandLife Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:18 p.m.

With a caveat carved out just in case there’s some interest in racing in the future that we want to support, my kid has already been told that her first full suspension bike will be the first bike she buys herself. 

My wife and I both only own hardtails these days (though I do sometimes test FS bikes). I’m not as fast downhill on my Walt as similarly capable friends on 6” travel bikes but I’m having just as much fun. 

But again, we aren’t park riders or shuttlers and I get there are many philosophies on parenting and bikes.

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IslandLife
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
IslandLife  - Aug. 16, 2021, 11:52 a.m.

Ha, ya... I guess the caveat to my above comment being that... I'm also willing to spend x number of hours in my workshop and have the knowledge to keep the bikes happily spinning (personal philosophy is that spending a few minutes after or before each ride to sort things out when keeps the larger repairs/failures low).

This has been an interesting year... met a number of families this year getting their kids into the sport and then deciding they should join as well.  Went from being the guy to help sort through the intense Coivd-hyped used bike market, to the guy to help them sort out and set up their bikes, to the guy that when they realized all the shops are backed up 3 weeks and have severe parts shortages..., teach them some basic bike maintenance and/or repairs and/or tubeless conversions because just like everything else... there are zero tubes out there (especially 24" and 26" presta).  Anyway... my beer fridge is now packed to the brim!

I've also slowly been showing the kids how it's done in order to get them to take over some of the basic maintenance.  The priority was getting them hooked on the awesome-ness of riding first.  And now that they can't live without it... I'll be moving some of the cost and maintenance onto their little shoulders... sorry kids, it's not all kittens and single track!

Reply

cooperquinn
+1 Andrew Major
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 13, 2021, 9:42 a.m.

"But what's incredible to me, as much as I've loved every era of mountain biking I've experienced, is that some folks actually think riding in shitty gear, on shitty bikes, is some kind of right-of-passage."

Some people think this applies to trails, as well.

Reply

craw
+2 Andrew Major Cooper Quinn
Cr4w  - Aug. 13, 2021, 11:26 a.m.

I ran into a dude on a 26" Knolly Podium, 888s, in a hockey jersey and full face pushing up Burke. He absolutely refused to believe anything that came after was good. Flash frozen, no new ideas getting through.

I loved that stuff at the time and mostly what followed was a big improvement. It's hard to imagine thinking what he have right now is the only thing that could ever be good.

Reply

cooperquinn
+2 Cr4w Tjaard Breeuwer
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 13, 2021, 11:33 a.m.

It was better than the stuff that came before it, for the most part! Its how progress works, and to your point, we're still doin' it. 

Just because THAT guy learned to ride on teh gnarliez... doesn't mean we still need to. It was kind of a crappy path. 

The "we used to do it in an objectively worse, harder way, and everyone else should now have to follow that same path" attitude drives me bonkers.

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AndrewMajor
+2 Greg Bly Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 11:32 a.m.

I think it’s important to not be too glib/flippant with comments like this. 

I agree with the sentiment that I assume you’re bringing to the table re. eroded to sh*t trails but I think it’s important to add a caveat here that riding & loving old school technical trails in great shape - Grannies, Upper/Lower Crippler, etc - is a matter of preference and not the same as riding around chaffing your nipples in a sweaty T.

Reply

cooperquinn
+2 Andrew Major Tjaard Breeuwer
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 13, 2021, 12:08 p.m.

I'm a bit confused, and think we've possibly gotten wires crossed... I'm just talking about trail progression; I'm not commenting on 'eroded or technical trails' at all?

I WOULD say learning to ride bikes on Grannies, Upper/Lower Crippler, etc was a bad plan when they were new, and would be a bad plan now... much like chaffing your nipples in a sweaty T on your first rides? Maybe its a bad metaphor. I'm not saying old trails are bad, I'm saying how we all learned to ride was bad. 

There's a better way to learn how to ride (we understand how trail progression and stacked loop systems work), and being hurled down TNT on your second ride isn't some kind of 'right-of-passage' that folks should to be be subjected to.

Reply

DanL
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
DanL  - Aug. 13, 2021, 2:49 p.m.

I like the WBP method of making it straightforwards to find what trail progression avenues there are for people at the level they are at as they find their way around the mountain. The same set of trails for progression and stacked loops on the North Shore would be great to have in a clear well laid out manner in the same kind of format for people starting out or coming over instead of grinding through petabytes of gopro footage.

I made the guess that trails lower down on Fromme , McNair up to Bobsled was the 'entrance exam zone' -  that I'd enjoy the other trails a lot more if I could clean all the lower trails. 

(also, "rite" not "right" - unless you're describing a country's right for its ships to pass through the territorial seas of foreign states - which is also possibly valid for me, currently being foreign.)

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 3:09 p.m.

I think I mis-read or mis-understood your comment.

My first North Shore ride was Bookwus/Grannies and I agree that’s a shitty thing to do to a rider (new, or just new to the Shore). Certainly that’s not a universal learning-to-ride experience though. Even for back then. Whereas all our gear sucked.

At the same time though. I saw different parents / big kids sessioning Pipeline at least a half dozen times this year and I think going out and tackling trails that are even mostly within your ability  by breaking them down into pieces - the way a lot of us learned - is still a great method, even if it’s unfashionable. 

And maybe that’s an interpretation too far as well?!

Reply

andrewbikeguide
+2 Andrew Major Tjaard Breeuwer
AndrewR  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:27 a.m.

Some times "friends" don't really think things through and their well meaning invite to a ride is actually not a very friendly thing to do.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:39 a.m.

Hahahaha. This was a pack of NSMB forum cretins going by GrimJack IFO, and Noodles - though I didn’t know that at the time.

I was riding my MinuteMan up Mountain Hwy and had made it to Leppard when I caught their group.

Me: “Hi! It’s my first time on F-Row-Am. Could you guys tell me how much longer it takes to get to 7th Secret?”

Them: “That trail is totally clapped out. You should come ride good trails with us.”

Me: “Okay?”

Bookwus to Grannies still challenges me in ways beyond the raw terrain. I actually did really, really well on a Bookwus ride a couple weeks ago and was thinking back to that first experience after.

craw
+1 Andrew Major
Cr4w  - Aug. 13, 2021, 12:22 p.m.

It's very difficult to get newer riders to retroactively develop an appreciation for tech gnar and jank. Many of us learned to ride on the old gnar and we will always have a soft spot for it and revisiting it can be fun. I think it's hard for newer riders to commit to developing those special skills when more familiar pleasures are available.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Cr4w
Andrew Major  - Aug. 13, 2021, 3:11 p.m.

That hasn’t been my experience. I’ve ridden with quite a few folks in their 20’s who’d rather hit Upper Crippler than Lower Digger.

*edit. Including climbing up under their own steam.

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samroberts
0
Sam Roberts  - Sept. 26, 2021, 7:05 p.m.

That's not universal among new riders. I wonder if its more common with people introduced to riding at bike parks? WBP wouldn't have a business if their trails weren't mostly flow, because its progressive in the sense that they are easy to roll down slowly, but can then be ridden harder and faster and with more air as the rider gets better. My 11 year olds are convinced flow trails aren't actually mountain biking (just for the record, I think that's unfair, though funny). When a techy rock roll feature on one of the Fromme trails that they were working towards being able to clean got buried in "gold" recently, erasing it, it triggered a rant that they'd stop riding if the only thing left was smooth dirt trails with berms. They refuse to ride Expresso, they'd rather go down Pipeline or Ladies (which have tons of stuff they can't ride, or need me spotting them) because every time we ride there is one more feature they can ride, and they get a lot of satisfaction from that.

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Shoreloamer
+2 Andrew Major Cr4w
Greg Bly  - Aug. 14, 2021, 12:39 a.m.

I've had the opportunity to watch a woman progress on double black gnar . That's what she started riding when she moved to Canada. She only rode XC before moving here. Sorry Cooper but janky natural beast of trails are very exciting to a select few. Definitely not the masses . Thank God . Right of passage. Well yes if you enjoy this crazy stuff your in a different smaller fringe group.  Yes I ride 26 inch wheels. I'm a Luddite. 

I'm glad we all love to ride for whatever the reason . 

I bring two light weight synthetic jerseys and switch at the top of the climb. Comfortable relatively close fitting shorts that are a spandex blend. But not necessarily biking specific. Modern synthetic s are the best for comfort , breathing, they are quiet and light. And every time you wash them thousands of plastic microfibres end up in the sea. 😁

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AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - Aug. 14, 2021, 7:29 a.m.

It’s so crazy how there’s always that environmental downside to everything. My family lives in a small space, we have one car and try and maximize our bike and transit miles (if the last week has been a preview of September traffic then even more so) but there’s always more things to consider. 

Lately it’s been the great air-conditioning debate. It’s not about making our place cold it’s about making our place comfortable enough to sleep? Anyways, we don’t have one for a lot of reasons and I do my best writing in the middle of the night anyways?! Haha… ahhhh.

My friend Tom is the greenest mountain biker I know. He buys used bikes with a preference towards steel, he uses stuff WAY beyond its serviceable life (sometimes in scary ways like stems and bars) but his attempt at fully ditching petroleum-based synthetic clothing ended in relative failure. Merino jersey , sure, but the waxed-cotton waterproof jacket was like riding it a weighted hazmat suit and so can’t even remember what he did for shorts.

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cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 15, 2021, 9:35 a.m.

Reminder for your AC that here in BC, power is generally hydro power. 

We can debate the 'greenness' of hydro power all day long, but turning your AC on isn't really putting more greenhouse gasses in the air here. (all that said, we set ours to "as warm as comfortably possible" too.)

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AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - Aug. 15, 2021, 11:28 a.m.

I mean, even if we had it hooked up to our own solar panel isn’t the big issue with A/C that the systems themselves have emissions/ use a coolant that releases green house gases?

Anyways, my point was simply that even being more conscious than ever - at least on an individual level - there’s always that much more to think about.

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Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - Aug. 16, 2021, 10:20 a.m.

Andrew. A.C.   Thank you for not having the callus attitude. We got lots of power!  Being conservative is caring about your planet . Your families future. 

Remember the heat wave? The black outs caused by overconsumption of electricity? From AC units I'm certain. What happened to the sick and the elderly that truly needed that AC?  They died. Sorry that's rather extreme but unfortunately accurate. 

Thank you Andrew for understanding that we need to consume less and be more thoughtful of all our actions.

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cooperquinn
+1 Andrew Major
Cooper Quinn  - Aug. 15, 2021, 9:33 a.m.

I love janky trails, natural trails, gnarly trails... all kinds of trails.

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Tjaardbreeuwer
+1 Andrew Major
Tjaard Breeuwer  - Aug. 17, 2021, 6:09 a.m.

The dedicated bike shorts have been very worthwhile purchases for my girls. 

First of all, obviously, they make biking more comfortable.

Second, they  wear them for at least two years, (despite some serious growing).

Third, they often wear them off the bike as well.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2021, 8:18 a.m.

I’m trying to convince my grom that she can wear her flexy, comfy, awesome shorts off the bike too but she’s very suspicious. I certainly do not compartmentalize my clothes.

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khai
0
khai  - Aug. 19, 2021, 6:19 p.m.

I tend to, if only to prolong their life.  7mesh/Icebreaker/Mons Royale/etc. is spendy stuff, and if I can prolong its life by not wearing it while doing non-athletic activities, I will.  It's tempting to grab the nice/comfy kit for digging/wrenching/whatever, but I know the odds of reducing the overall lifespan of my kit is much higher when I wear it everywhere.  (I'll wear merino at my desk in a heatwave though)

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