Chromag Doctahawk Frame Black/Purple Fade
Interview With Chromag's Ian Ritz

How About That Chromag Doctahawk?

Words AJ Barlas
Photos All Images Courtesy of Chromag Bikes
Date Feb 22, 2019

Chromag isn’t afraid to colour outside the line. In fact, the company was founded around charting their own path. Since day zip, their hardtail frames have steered to the aggressive side; durable and capable bikes. As such, they’ve always featured more travel up front than typical hardtails. The release of their Doctahawk frame continues the bloodline but it may have skipped a generation or two.

When the news of the Doctahawk dropped on Pinkbike, hoards of keyboard warriors scoffed at the numbers and even doubted its capability. They questioned the long-travel fork with nothing in the rear, and some even claimed Chromag got so caught up in the what they were making, that they forgot to ask if they should be making it. What they forgot is that the people behind Chromag build what they want to ride. It’s a refreshing outlook in a world of lemmings, and the Doctahawk epitomizes this point of view. 

I’m not a hardtail guy, but I am a fan of bikes with original approaches to shape and size.  I wanted to know more about the Chromag Doctahawk, which has intrigued me since I first laid eyes on Ian’s Tomahawk proto. I wanted to know more. Thankfully, Chromag was keen to spread the word.

Chromag Doctahawk Frame Hot Orange

As if the bike doesn't stand out enough! The paint colours, like this bright orange, demand your attention. Of course, you can opt for a subtle hue as well, if you prefer to keep it low-key. 

Interview with Ian Ritz

It’s been a little while since we’ve seen a brand new Chromag model. How did the Doctahawk come to be?

Our riding buddy and tester, Clark Lewis (AKA Doc Tomahawk) was pushing me to make this bike. We sat down together for a few design sessions and drew it up. At the time I was skeptical considering how much longer the front center was than our current designs—which we had already made about an inch longer a year ago, but I was curious and we ended up making three prototypes to test.

Where does the Doctahawk fit into the range?

Like most of our models, this is a hardtail for riding all types of trail, and it very much relates to the terrain we have here in Whistler and all around B.C.  I wouldn’t slot it into any one category because while it’s a great descender, it easily rivals the climbing ability of our other frames. As a 29er, it resembles our Primer/Rootdown platform, however, most notably; it’s about an inch longer per size. Since the seat tube is also a lot shorter per size, a rider could easily be moving up a couple inches in reach. 

The longer wheelbase really changes the way it feels and it’s definitely not as spontaneous feeling in terms of pulling up the front end. If you want to manual, it takes a bit of planning, but it just plows through stuff. In this sense, it’s a bit of a sled that eats up chunder and corners really well at speed. You might call it a more ‘aggressive’ hardtail, I mean… we do build it with a 180mm fork… But really it’s just a different geometry theory. It’s a different bike and it may not be for everybody. Then again, it could be where frame geometry is going. Time will tell.

There’s also a new welder working on the Doctahawk model. Tell us about him and how that relationship formed.

Brad Howlett is our new welder and the Doctahawk will be his model. He's based in Nanaimo and has actually been involved with our frame fabrication for a couple years as Chris Dekerf’s copilot, assisting in the building of our Surface frames. Brad worked for Rocky Mountain and Dekerf in the ’90s and then worked as a race car chassis fabricator for the following decade or so. Chris recommended Brad to us last year and if you know Chris… well, let’s just say he has high standards. It was a strong vote in his favour. Plus, he’s a really nice guy and an avid rider. As a Chromag welder, he checks all the boxes.

Our Canadian made models are welder specific. Mike Truelove makes the Samurais and Primers, Chris Dekerf makes the Surface frames. With Brad, we decided to try him out on the Doctahawk and if they flew, he would make them.

Ian's Prototype "Tomahawk"

Ian's proto, was dubbed "Tomahawk" early on in reference to Whistler ER doc Clark Lewis, who was instrumental in the push for this aggressive beast. It's not for everyone, but I reckon this thing looks perfectly balanced visually. The colour is also very appealing to me…


Since Chromag’s inception, the bikes have been aggressive hardtails but the Doctahawk steps it up a notch. How and why did Chromag go so aggressive with the new bike?

I think we would have gotten there eventually. I was quite interested in what some other builders were doing in this direction. But Clark really wanted to push the numbers. If he hadn’t been so adamant it might have taken us another year or two. Like previous bikes of ours, this started out as a geometry experiment and turned into a new model.

People seem to be losing it based on the static numbers in the geometry chart. Can you explain how they work and why they’re as aggressive as they are?

For us, it’s not as extreme in every direction as you might think. With the same fork, it’s only about a degree slacker than our Rootdown/Primer (note that the Doctahawk is built for a fork ranging from 160–180mm) and the seat tube is one to two degrees steeper. The most dramatic difference is the front center length and I could see lots of people having a hard time getting their heads around that. Depending on what you are coming from, a bike with a similar seat tube length could be 3–4 inches shorter in wheelbase than the Doctahawk! 

So yeah, this is a bike that's quite long overall and has a really long reach. The pedal to cockpit is the most dramatic difference and that changes things quite a bit. For me, it took some adaptation to learn to ride it. Now I love it. Geo has been going this way for a while now and we aren’t the first to build bikes this long. Who knows, they may go longer. After a season on one, it doesn’t feel like we’re pushing the limits at all. 

A lot of folks also seem to be hung up on the wheelbase and reach but seem to miss that the steep STA and shorter 40mm stem provide a pretty standard cockpit. What would you say to doubters that think such a bike can’t climb well?

I could only prove this by offering a demo but climbing this bike is not a problem. I’ve had some of my best climbs ever including cleaning Value Added in Squamish for my first time ever. If you know this trail, it’s steep, with lots of braided slippery roots and really tight switchbacks. It’s got to be a really good day to make the climb. In May we have the Nimby Fifty race coming up which is a good couple hours plus, starting with an hour-long technical climb. The Doctahawk will be the bike I’ll ride.

Chromag Doctahawk Geometry

The Doctahawk features long reach numbers, a relatively slack headangle and steep seat tube angle, and chainstays that lengthen as you go up in size. But it's what happens when you're on the bike that matters, not what the static numbers are.


Why run a 180mm travel fork on a hardtail?

Maybe the purist aspect of riding a hardtail doesn’t coincide with running an extremely long fork, but we are riding these bikes on demanding terrain and without rear suspension, you use the fork a lot. We’ve always had long forks on our bikes and when a 180mm Lyrik became available… who wouldn’t want to try it! The availability of a 180mm Lyrik was a driver in some part of the frame design.

How much does the fork travel influence the static and dynamic geometry of the Doctahawk?

Quite a lot. Obviously, as soon as you sag a fork, the angles of a hardtail will change. Considering that the fork is constantly active on a bumpy ride, you probably spend a good majority of the time into a good portion of that travel. There has been some discussion here suggesting that a hardtail could have a slacker front end than a full suspension because of this.

The bottom bracket height on the Doctahawk is the same as the Rootdown, but there is 20mm more travel up front. Are you recommending less sag when setting up the Doctahawk?

20mm at the fork equates to 5.9mm difference in height at the BB. Assuming that the times when you are concerned about bb height and pedal clearance is when you are pedalling through obstacles and not using the majority of your travel, you could probably cut that difference in half again. That’s a bit theoretical but I can say that increased pedal strikes have not been noticed in testing.

The chainstay length grows as the frame size increases, but STA remains constant. Can you explain why?

We have been experimenting with longer chainstays and particularly as this model is so very long in the bigger sizes, we felt it appropriate to lengthen the chainstays per size.

We haven’t felt that STA would change relative to sizes… at least not so far. I certainly would like to hear any theories on it.

Chromag Doctahawk headtube

With about 35–40mm of sag the head tube on the Doctahawk steepens to around 63.5 degrees. It's still slack, but with a hardtail, the pivot point is changed and the head angle steepens quickly. 


What is the STA when the fork is set to Chromag's recommended sag measurement?

HTA and STA angle changes about a degree per 25mm of travel. Assuming about 35–40mm of sag you’re looking at about a degree and a half, give or take.

Despite the long reach the bikes are being specified with the same 40mm stem length as the Rootdown. Why not a shorter 31–35mm Chromag stem to provide close to the same cockpit length?

40mm is the default spec in our build kits but we do adjust per the customer’s preference. In most cases, I would expect that a rider moving to the Doctahawk would be downsizing.

What is Chromag’s experience with different fork offset on such a bike? What offset is specified with a complete Doctahawk?

We tested both offsets with this bike and I’d say the difference is quite minimal and in many cases, hard to notice at all. We all adapted to the offset we had at each session pretty quickly. I observed that the shorter offset tends to wander a bit during slow speed scenarios, like climbing, but was less prone to deflection from head on bumps with a bit of speed.

Is the Doctahawk available to the public now? Have any gone out to customers yet?

Yes! We made a very small initial production of 12 frames and have since sold those. We’ve been taking pre-orders on the next batch.

Check out all of the details for the Chromag Doctahawk on their website.


Comments

Mic
+1 Cam McRae
Mic  - Feb. 22, 2019, 12:51 a.m.

I am really intrigued by the beast...I love hardtail riding so much, apart from bikepark shredding. Still, I think I would love to test ride one but live on the wrong continent, and my plan is to buy a new ht in two years, and I think I would go with a Stylus again, this time with 27.5 wheels. I like it playful and nimble.

Still...awesome way to go for Chromag.

Reply

Timer
+3 AJ Barlas Tremeer023 Mammal
Timer  - Feb. 22, 2019, 5:46 a.m.

It seems to me like the extremes of "long and slack" make more sense on a hardtail than on a dually. On the HT, being forced into a forward position with lots of weight on the arms and fork would actually be beneficial. More weight on the suspension, less on the pedals.

Reply

DBone95
0
Darryl Chereshkoff  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:35 a.m.

Not for me - different horses for courses and all, but why on a bike like this, why would they not spec a threaded BB?

Reply

Vikb
+3 Carlos Matutes JVP Cr4w
Vik Banerjee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:56 a.m.

Wide tire clearance and short CS. Not impossible to fabricate with a threaded BB, but a lot easier with a PF BB. 

I spent years on a PF BB bike and so did my GF. We had no issues at all. Threaded BBs are a little easier to deal with, but I wouldn't avoid another wise sweet bike just because of a PF BB.

Reply

xy9ine
+4 Carlos Matutes JVP Niels Vik Banerjee
Perry Schebel  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:59 a.m.

wider shell for more tire clearance i assume.

vik with the faster fingers...

fwiw, i kinda prefer the pf (at least based on my personal problem free experience). pop in & out faster, tool free, no threads to worry about.

Reply

Kenny
+2 Carlos Matutes JVP
Kenny  - Feb. 22, 2019, 9:54 a.m.

Especially on a steel frame, and especially if you use a thread-together bottom bracket, it's pretty irrelevant. I really like the thread together style, it is super solid.

Reply

JVP
+1 Carlos Matutes
JVP  - Feb. 22, 2019, 3:31 p.m.

I prefer a PF on both steel and carbon. VERY much prefer it on carbon due to less failure prone without that alum insert bonded in there.

I'd choose threaded on alum, all else equal (which it never is), but as Kenny says the thread-together make it a non-issue even on alum.

The whole anti-PF thing is based on a few poorly executed BBs early on, and a lot of (admittedly fun!) internet ranting.

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craw
+2 Mammal Cam McRae
Cr4w  - Feb. 22, 2019, 8:28 a.m.

This bike is awesome. With so many brands being so conservative with their evolutions it's great to see some wild ideas come out. Keep them coming.

Reply

xy9ine
+2 Mammal Cam McRae
Perry Schebel  - Feb. 22, 2019, 8:51 a.m.

this. so many years of painfully incremental geometry tweaks. fun to see a few builders kicking out the jams. imagine if people were trying numbers like this 10 years ago?

Reply

Timer
+1 maxc
Timer  - Feb. 22, 2019, 10:54 a.m.

Why don't we get it over with and just make a bike with 45° head angle, 95° STA and 1m of reach?

36" wheels optional.

Reply

nouseforaname
+2 Andrew Major Timer
Nouseforaname  - Feb. 22, 2019, 11:48 a.m.

The physics of how bikes work are pretty complex, even without introducing full suspension, rider movement, trail terrain changes etc etc into the mix. Who can really say what is the end point - without making it yourself and trying it.

Even Mr "bleeding edge" PVD accepts that the bikes he makes that are the best; are only the best for the terrain he rides. And he is literally putting his money where his mouth is and making the solutions to problems he encounters. And able to fabricate and engineer from the ground up.

Bikes shouldn't be a one bike rides all trails design. But that's what we get. And that's why we get 1/2 degree changes every year or two (once the moulds are paid off).

Reply

Timer
+1 LWK
Timer  - Feb. 22, 2019, 12:15 p.m.

I was only half joking. Why is noone making something actually extreme? So far, even the most experimental frames are only a handfull of degrees different from the mainstream. We are only approaching the boundaries from one side.

Sure, making something truly extreme might ride terribly, but so far every single "outrageous" frame has found its buyers.

I'm also not quite so sure about the need for specialization of bikes to trails. Over the last 10 years, bikes have become less specialized. XC bikes are more capable in the rough than ever, enduro/trail bikes go uphill better than they have ever done. I wouldn't want to buy a bike that only works in the area i live in. I want to take it places,  go on road trips, maybe do a race, experience different terrain without needing a quiver of ever more expensive bikes.

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - Feb. 24, 2019, 8:43 p.m.

It's because of the mould repayment schedule that the most progressive bikes will be made of metal for the foreseeable future.

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Feb. 22, 2019, 8:29 a.m.

A lot of good thinking with this bike. Longer stays for larger bikes only makes sense. I’m too short to fit this at 5’5” but it is interesting for sure.

Reply

Kpw2011
0
Kpw2011  - Feb. 22, 2019, 8:51 a.m.

I am dieing to own this bike. I ride mostly dh on my big dh bike but I have always ridden hardtail too on the same dh trails prefing steep tec over flow. For 10yrs I've run 170/180mm forks on hardtails and loved it. I'm happy that chromag has finally addressed a couple of issues that have been bugging me personally. Long travel HT and low stand over. Good job chromag. But how can I sneak a new bike into my collection.

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legbacon
0
legbacon  - Feb. 22, 2019, 9:40 a.m.

Well, I am a hardtail guy, who rides a Pipedream Moxie a lot of the time.  I was surprised just how little the lack of rear suspension slowed me down, that is until the hits get bigger.  I am happy to see Chromag pushing the geometry boundry, how else are we going to know what's too far?

Reply

LWK
+3 Rick Lyngen Timer Andrew Major
LWK  - Feb. 22, 2019, 9:51 a.m.

Not sure how this would work on tighter, low slope "normal" trails but to me this looks like an ideal hard tail for riding the gnarliest trails around Whistler.  

I dont get all the yelling about HT angle.  If your suspension fork moves up and down then yes the HT angle has to change but if you're that obsessed or perturbed by the idea then maybe a hardtail isnt your ride.

Marketing is a fickle mistress and Chromag does seem to have that black art mastered but... this is hardly progressive.  Wheel size aside, Nicolai has had a HT with similar geometry for several years now.  And I think at least a few other European brands as well.  Blasphemy, I know :)

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 LWK Mammal
Andrew Major  - Feb. 22, 2019, 10:46 a.m.

I love that this bike exists - from my own experimenting I’d prefer the standing weight balance of the XL rear-centre on the M/L front end but I don’t presume to tell Chromag what kind of bikes they like to ride. 

And, frankly, there’s a robust selection of custom builders in the world for a reason.

——

I do have to agree with you though. There’s a very Michael J Fox wrote Johnny B Goode thing going on with the press about this bike.

Reply

nouseforaname
+1 Andrew Major
Nouseforaname  - Feb. 22, 2019, 11:28 a.m.

I don't see why this isn't a thing. I mean they're welding them one at a time. And if you really want the long back end - well Brad just pulls those tubes instead of the M/L tubes.

Sure it might mean that you're waiting a couple of months, not just picking your colour and having it in days (or however long that process takes).

That's the only thing i don't just LOVE about this bike - i wish the M/L stays were longer - I've hesitated pulling the trigger on a Rootdown for a long time for that reason.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Cr4w
Andrew Major  - Feb. 22, 2019, 1:28 p.m.

Chromag makes great product and has an awesome brand & culture. I really appreciate how much stuff they make domestically and support them with my purchasing decisions whenever it makes sense. I also appreciate they sell what they ride as much as the short stays aren’t for me. 

That said, in my experiences they’re a production frame company and aren’t aligned with the kind of semi-custom work that folks like us - on the outside looking in - may think would be easy value-added options (even at an upcharge) on their small batch domestically made frames. 

I mean, technically Rocky Mountain has the expertise and manufacturing and paint capabilities to create custom length rear ends for their FS bikes but I wouldn’t expect them to offer the service.

Reply

morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Feb. 25, 2019, 4:58 p.m.

Your Honzo had short stays though, you didn't like that? I think it's fun on a hard tail. Easier to manual, pump, and jump. I've got a Stanton with super short stays and it's a blast on most trails, and better than my fs bike on flow trails.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Feb. 25, 2019, 7:18 p.m.

I have long run my Honzos as close to full-long as possible.  They have ~20mm of adjustment so I'd hover between 430-435mm long stays (not the 415mm min). I even switched chainring size (same ratio) to maximize this length.

geraldooka
0
Michael  - Feb. 22, 2019, 12:08 p.m.

Which bike is that? Even their current aggressive HT doesn't have these numbers...

From the tech sheet:

geometry details

E Lenkwinkel head angle 63,0°

F Sitzrohrwinkel real seat angle 74,0°

Even the new Moxie doesn't have numbers like the Doctahawk. The closest thing to this are the crazy frames from Sick bikes and I would not put those in the same class or quality as a Chromag by a mile. Next would be the Ti Kingdom UK spec but even that doesn't have the seat angle...

I'm a hardtail lover too I don't want a hardtail like the Doctahawk but I think its rad that the geometry envelope is being pushed and especially so by a Canadian manufacturer. I have yet to find another hardtail that has these numbers, someone prove me wrong please.

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:24 p.m.

BTR Belter? Since 2011. Stack on 650b seems excessive; otherwise comparable.

Reply

geraldooka
0
Michael  - Feb. 22, 2019, 9:42 p.m.

Not quite. Totally dig BTR but the Belter is very different. 75 sta vs 77, 470 reach vs 526 Wheelbase of 1269 vs 1308 for the same size! Head tube angles are similar though 61 for the belter vs 62 for the Doctahawk and the Doc is a 29er vs a 275.

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Feb. 23, 2019, 6:21 a.m.

Picky picky. For similar money one can have a true custom melted up with whatever numbers one likes.

Reply

nouseforaname
+5 Andy Eunson Ceecee Cr4w AJ Barlas Andrew Major
Nouseforaname  - Feb. 22, 2019, 11:40 a.m.

Quote = IanR "We haven’t felt that STA would change relative to sizes… at least not so far. I certainly would like to hear any theories on it." 

The only reason to do that would be to deal with an Xl frame having the same size Rear Centre as a Small. The Xl frames rider weight would be much closer to the rear axle compared to the Small changing the weight balance/handling of the bike. In theory. In Clarkes comments about the frame design he said he preferred the longer stays.

My guess is that the 'geometry wars' will become less about front centre (reach) in the future and more about rear centre. More front centre has been generally accepted. Longer rear centre will be about the type of terrain you're riding in. Big chunky descending focussed terrain = longer rear centres on bikes. Flowy mellower trails = shorter (standard) rear centres. It's all about where you ride. It's kind of crazy that bikes are designed by riders riding trails in Marin or California and then they're expected to perform as just well as bikes designed for a very different set of trails in Western BC.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 12:13 p.m.

"It's kind of crazy that bikes are designed by riders riding trails in Marin or California and then they're expected to perform as just well as bikes designed for a very different set of trails in Western BC."

I would assume riders who are into MTBs would take into consideration where the folks designing the bikes ride and what their interests are. I have nothing against people riding flow trails and designing bikes for them. As long as I don't have to ride 'em or ride the bikes designed for 'em.

With that in mind I don't think thoughtful people expect a specific bike to work everywhere equally well.

Reply

nouseforaname
0
Nouseforaname  - Feb. 22, 2019, 5:31 p.m.

Well, maybe not  as "crazy" as i made it out to be up there; but I do think that bikes designed in the area that they are ridden have value. The early freeride bikes were a clear example of that - and even on into the 2000s, brands like Norco focussed on brakes and suspension over pretty much every other aspect of the bike, as that's what mattered to the locals.

Reply

JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - Feb. 22, 2019, 11:45 p.m.

i don't buy the whole bikes made here are for here thing.  look at pro racing.  RM sponsors guys riding Instinct BC edition bikes with fairly tame geometries all over the globe to great effect along with everyone else. bumps are bumps are bumps. great bikes are great bikes, great suspension is great suspension in coastal BC, the Rockies, Colorado or Ohio.

Reply

Vikb
0
Vik Banerjee  - Feb. 23, 2019, 8:01 a.m.

"...but I do think that bikes designed in the area that they are ridden have value. "

Agreed. I don't limit myself to my geographical region, but I do look for designers that like to ride terrain that is similar to mine.

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:41 p.m.

I'd want something doctahawkish in Mammoth. Astute observation on relation between STA and rear center. As I'm not racing, I'll suffer with the fun of a shorter chainstay.

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UFO
0
UFO  - Feb. 22, 2019, 4:01 p.m.

Is there any reason not to have an overseas made version of this?

Reply

nouseforaname
0
Nouseforaname  - Feb. 22, 2019, 5:28 p.m.

Yes; Pinkbike hates it, so obviously the 12 people that ponied up for the BC version are going to die in a tornado of fire on their first ride and Chromag will be forced to close down in the face of law suits from vengeful families and trail organisations. Let's hope one hasn't ended up in Kelowna.

Or maybe they're working on it. Code name "Champagne dreams". << Building the hype.

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:32 p.m.

Demand, aka applied want. I bet we'll see a Taiwanese version by Spring 2020.

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craw
+3 Metacomet AJ Barlas legbacon
Cr4w  - Feb. 23, 2019, 8:08 a.m.

This bike will need to be well-received in more places than just here to justify offshore production quantities. If that happens I hope those commenters on Pinkbike enjoy their serving of crow. Seriously. The same people who hated 29ers, thought 72' seat angles were totally fine and that you'd never pedal a 66' HTA around have all quietly joined the future. I don't think the Doctahawk is going to be the high water mark of extreme geo.

Reply

Kenny
0
Kenny  - Feb. 23, 2019, 10:54 a.m.

Definitely not as extreme as people think, in my opinion. I have a new Rootdown in L, same reach, same chainstay as the M/L doctahawk. 64 degree head tube instead of 62. I'm 5'11" and somewhat between sizes on the rootdown. I already know I prefer 475mm+ for reach to the large was the right choice for me.

On a doctahawk I'd probably be on M/L, which would have me at roughly the same dimensions but 2 degrees slacker HTA and 1 degree steeper seat tube.

The rootdown feels totally normal, and I had already considered an angleset for the future, prior to the doctahawk being released.

So realistically if the M/L doctahawk is your size and you want a made in Taiwan version, buy an L rootdown and put an angleset in it and you're 95% of the way there.

Also with 2.6/2.4 tires, BB height is about 324mm, which is loads on a hardtail. I am think a 1 degree slackset will be amazing, 63 degree HTA, 76.5 STA, and about a 318mm bottom bracket all with a 160mm fork

Reply

UFO
0
UFO  - Feb. 23, 2019, 2:45 p.m.

Problem with the L Rooty is the 470mm seat tube length, thats an extra 2" over the M/L Hawk. Think about it in terms of running a 150mm dropper post vs. 100mm dropper (which are basically obsolete these days for our intents and purposes)

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Kenny
0
Kenny  - Feb. 23, 2019, 3:27 p.m.

In practice 470 is good. The rootdown used to be 495 which is why I never bought one previously. I'm 5'11" and and wear 30 inseam jeans. 150 dropper is borderline for me with a 495 post. 

I am running a transfer 150 and still have some post showing, that is also with 175 cranks and a fairly tall chromag Ltd saddle. 

So there might be a few people that find the 470 limiting but it'd be rare, I speak from experience as I have really short legs. If you were more like 5'8" but wanted a 470+reach then it'd be a no go.

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UFO
+1 Cr4w
UFO  - Feb. 23, 2019, 2:41 p.m.

Going back in history, the Primer was quite aggressive for the time. The Rootdown BA was released basically simultaneously to the Primer, moving away from the og Surface derived geometry. If nothing else, I bet they could easily sell out a production run in the sea2sky corridor alone.

More than anything else on PB, people were bitching at the cost (for 'just' a steel ht)-- without realizing that's the exact same as what a Samurai, Surface, and Primer have cost. Cut that frame price in half and I bet the whole concept is instantly received more positively.

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grcgrc
+1 Ceecee
grcgrc  - Feb. 22, 2019, 5:39 p.m.

Personally I am all for it. At 193 cm tall I have rarely found a bike that comes close to being long enough. An old Ritchey had a 170 mm stem which was just about right for that frame. And I felt comfortably balanced on it. My current HT has a 70mm stem on it and it could stand to be another cm or two longer IMO. I am chomping at the bit to demo the beast. It sounds perfect for me.

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Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - Feb. 22, 2019, 7:55 p.m.

So how about a 100/180mm bike? Chromag's first production full-boinger. Why not?

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JVP
0
JVP  - Feb. 23, 2019, 10:55 a.m.

I really hope Chromag stays interesting. IF they ever do a fully, it should be steel, weird, and low volume.

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Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - Feb. 23, 2019, 11:50 a.m.

I really want to try this bike. 

And one of those 10mm stems. On my

Own bike

Reply

OLDF150
+3 Metacomet Cr4w JVP
Kerry Williams  - Feb. 24, 2019, 12:04 p.m.

The thing that appeals to me most about these new geometry bikes more than anything is seat tube angles that are appropriate for spending a bunch of time climbing. It's unfortunate that some frame makers make the angle slacker on the bigger models. What they don't realize is that thos of us with long inseams end up with our asses way off the back and for that reason, the post or tube, the steeper the angle should be, not slacker. Thank you Chromag for keeping sta the same throughout the size range.

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craw
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Cr4w  - Feb. 25, 2019, 9:20 a.m.

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