giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6072.jpg
Flat Pedal Shoe Review

Giro Riddance Mid Shoe - Reviewed

Words AJ Barlas
Photos AJ Barlas
Date Nov 28, 2018

After a couple of years without one in the catalogue, Giro released a new mid-top flat pedal riding shoe. The original Jacket flat pedal shoe had a mid-top option that was short-lived. At the time of purchasing my first pair of Jacket shoes, I really wanted the mid-top. Unfortunately, it was already discontinued, forcing me to settle for the regular shoe. That shoe turned out to be a favourite and I was excited when the new mid-top version was announced.

Highlights

  • Water-resistant breathable fabric
  • Power strap at the ankle
  • Rubber toe and heel reinforcements
  • Vibram Megagrip rubber outsole
  • EVA midsole optimized for vibration damping
  • Molded DH EVA Footbed with arch support
  • 445 grams (size 43)
  • Colours: Dark Shadow and Dark Red/Black
  • MSRP: 139.99 USD

giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6090.jpg

A new mid-sole, updated Vibram rubber, and the return of a mid-top version were each exciting elements for the new Giro shoe model.


While I really enjoyed the Jacket shoes, our time together was short-lived. Their sole broke in quickly and continued to break down just as fast. After little more than a month of wear I had to retire them. They’d broken down such that adequate support and protection wasn’t possible. They never offered the most tenacious grip but when at their best, the combination of rubber, tread pattern and the amount of feel offered through the sole provided solid traction.

Now a few years on we have what Giro claims is the “stickiest shoe compound (Vibram) have ever launched.” Based on my previous experience this could mean a more enjoyable shoe, if durability has improved. Also updated were the tread pattern and the mid-sole.

giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6085.jpg

The updated Vibram sole that's claimed to improve grip over its predecessor. If only the tread was as deep as it appears here…

giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6065.jpg

This angle gives a more accurate impression and the tread looks like it could use some deeper grooves for pedal pins to lock into.


"So, we dug-in with the world’s most technical rubber experts at Vibram to create the stickiest shoe compound they have ever launched."

The Riddance shoes were comfortable from the first time I slid them on. Fit was true to size and the shoe offers a reasonable amount of padding. A downside is that they’re bulkier and the materials won’t dry as quickly as the Specialized 2F0 which is more streamlined. Something to consider for the wet weather riders. The sole felt thicker than the FiveTen Freerider Pro, Shimano GR9 and the old Giro Jacket. They also felt reasonably stiff but as experience with the Jacket and others has taught me, this can change quickly.

Early rides in the Giro Riddance shoe proved the stiffer mid-sole was too much for me.* Combined with extra thickness, I was never entirely sure where my feet were on the pedal. Lots of grip would compensate but I wasn't experiencing that with the Riddance. Aware that the Jacket shoes were such an enjoyable balance of grip and maneuverability I pushed on, hopeful these would break in and hit that sweet spot.

* For reference, the original Jacket, Freeride Pro, Michelin soled Shimano GR9 and latest Specialized 2F0 each have a mid-sole I enjoy. The 2F0 is the thicker of those but breaks in, creating a good balance. I can’t ride in something like a Vans skate shoe; their soles are quite thin.

giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6049.jpg

The updated mid-sole is more durable than the Giro Jacket flat-pedal shoe. It's also thicker and provides less pedal feel. 


After half dozen rides it seemed they weren't breaking in. To help expedite the process the shoes were subjected to a couple of smaller afternoon hikes and a day of trail work. In the past I’ve found this treatment works well. It gets the shoe to the final state without spending more time suffering on the bike. This process worked, but the changes were minimal. The sole of the new Riddance shoes maintain their support very well and if a thicker, stiffer flat pedal shoe is your preference, this is excellent news.

Riding flat pedal shoes that provide a great balance of traction and maneuverability is ideal for lots of riders. While I typically lean toward the most traction possible, the Jacket shoe provided the best balance of any shoe I’ve ridden yet. Enough grip to remain composed when it’s wild but with the ability to easily make micro-adjustments. Unfortunately, that didn’t transfer to the updated shoe. The rubber provides less grip than a pair of regular skates shoes, its firm surface refusing the advances of the pedal pins while the shallow tread pattern fails to add traction. A deeper groove would have allowed the pins to lock in more. They are very durable though and after loads of ride time, show little sign of pin wear.

giro-riddance-mid-140418-ajbarlas-6066.jpg

Tread depth under the ball of the foot and through the middle is shallow. If the more aggressive tread at the toe and heel of the Giro Riddance was used across the shoe, it's very possible traction would be improved.


Including the velcro strap across the ankle of the mid-top provides an excellent and secure feel in the shoe. With the correct fit, there's no chance of heel lift in the Riddance Mid. I’m also a big fan of the mid-foot elastic loop that has shown up on more recent riding shoes and the Riddance includes this. The loop provides a secure place for laces to be kept, keeping them clear of chainrings and other potential hazards as you whiz down the trail.

Ankle support and protection with the shoe is excellent. The additional padding here creates more material to hold water, but without it they could be less comfortable. Riders who clang their ankle on the crank will welcome the mid-top design. Those who don't will still appreciate the added stability, thanks to the support offered by the combination of the higher outer and strap.


Giro claims that the best flat pedal shoes provide confidence in any terrain or conditions, and I completely agree. For me, the Riddance Mid doesn’t meet this standard. It’s a shame because they are a great looking shoe that provides additional coverage with the mid-top design—something we don’t have many options for. Riders who like a stiffer, thicker flat pedal shoe could be happy with the Riddance Mid, especially if seeking one with plenty of maneuverability. They also seem to have nailed down durability, with the sole remaining relatively stiff and supportive despite my best efforts to break them down. Still, they fall short in terms of pedal grip. At 140 USD they’ll likely outlast similarly priced, grippier options, but at the cost of performance.

Head to the Giro website for more details on the Riddance and Riddance Mid shoes.




Comments

kazzy
+1 AJ Barlas
Kaz Yamamura  - Nov. 27, 2018, 11:45 p.m.

I had the exact same experience with my Giro Jacket and Riddance Mid shoes. My Jacket Mids were about 2 seasons old when the tread wore all the way down to the sole, and bought a pair of Riddance Mid shoes to replace them. I love everything about the shoe, from the elastic loop to hold your laces, to the ankle strap that keeps everything snug. Everything but the grip - the first lap down my feet bounced around so much I thought I lost all the pins on my pedal. After half a season of bike park riding they still hadn't broken in, and I ended up wearing my old Jacket Mids to see if the shoes actually sucked or something was wrong with me. The worn down Jackets had way more grip than the Riddance! I've ended up wearing the old shoes for every ride since then.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, 6:48 a.m.

Bummer Kaz. It’s a shame, aye. They have potential to be an incredible shoe with a tackier rubber outsole. Add some deeper tread and they would be phenominal! I wonder if a retread is possible? 🤔

Reply

morgan-heater
+1 AJ Barlas
Morgan Heater  - Nov. 28, 2018, 11:50 a.m.

Climbing shoe re-solers can put 5.10 rubber on them.

Reply

Tadpoledancer
0
Tadpoledancer  - Nov. 28, 2018, 9:55 a.m.

I just can’t understand why other companies can’t come up to five tens rubber standards? Should be fairly obvious what the majority of buyers want...

I’m really pleased so far with a pair of Impact Pros I picked up a month or so ago. They could have had a bit more protection on the ball of the ankle, but that’s pretty much my only complaint.

Reply

JVP
0
JVP  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:18 a.m.

I was talking to the owner of RC shoes at Interbike.  https://rideconcepts.com/  He was saying the cure time for the Five.Ten Stealth S1 rubber is about 6 months and fraught with peril, so it's obviously a hard thing to pull off.  He was tight lipped about their own rubber process, but early media testing looks positive. They've got several different stickiness levels.

RC is a new brand that looks really promising. Time and testing will tell.  I hope they guys make it, Adidas/Five.Ten really needs some sticky competition.

You'd think Vibram could do this, but so far they've struck out based on the media reviews I've read. And we all know how terrible something has to be to actually get a bad review on certain other sites.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:48 a.m.

Super interesting regarding the FiveTen rubber process. I assume there would be some patent hurdles for competitors as well. 

I've spent a few rides in the RC shoes. Current compounds available don't touch FiveTen, but offer more than the Vibram sole here. They have a stickier version coming in the future which I'm hoping to get some time on.

Reply

ehfour
0
ehfour  - Nov. 29, 2018, 11:27 a.m.

AJ- which shoes and compounds did you ride from RC.  And how far away from 510 stickiness are we talking?

My 3 season old 510s freeriders are in need of replacement

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 30, 2018, 7:58 a.m.

Hey ehfour. I spent time in the Livewire, which has the DST4.0. That’s their high grip compound and I found it to be close to the Michelin sole on the new Shimano flat pedal shoes. The sole is a bit thicker so it didn’t feel as good to me as the GR9 but others will prefer it. It’s definitely not as grippy as a FiveTen sole. 

Three seasons though? That sounds really good! I feel like if most were getting that long out of their FiveTen shoes they’d be satisfied with the cost.

Reply

ehfour
+1 AJ Barlas
ehfour  - Nov. 30, 2018, 8:16 a.m.

Thanks for the feedback.

As for the 510's I say 3 seasons, but there was a stint that I ran clipless..sssshhhh

ahaha thanks again

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 30, 2018, 8:31 a.m.

Correction. DST6.0 is the high grip. The 4.0 is what they say will be max grip. That shoe is slated for the new year.

agleck7
0
Agleck7  - Nov. 28, 2018, 9:59 a.m.

I love my Freerider Pros, but would trade some grip for durability.  I'm all the way through the rubber after 30 some rides

Reply

Tadpoledancer
0
Tadpoledancer  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:12 a.m.

I choose the impact pro model for durability. I think the sole is a bit thicker than the freerider.

Reply

agleck7
0
Agleck7  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:19 a.m.

I realize I'm wanting to have my cake and eat it too, but hoping more for durability for the rubber compound (and sacrificing some grip) rather than getting at durability for a thicker sole.  I really like the pedal feel from the thinner soles like Freerider/Freerider Pro.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:54 a.m.

I love my old Freerider Pro's and despite newer shoes being available, keep going back to them. Sadly, they're well beyond their use-by date though. 

Reply

JVP
0
JVP  - Nov. 28, 2018, 9:59 a.m.

I've never understand mtb shoes with thick soles. Was my biggest beef with the original Impacts, game-changers as they were.  We spend gobs of money (and sacrifice bearing durability) for the thinnest pedals, then put on shoes with an extra 10mm of height. 

Does five.ten still offer resole kits to cobblers?  I'd love to put a Stealth S1 sole on a pair of Goretex hiking boots for trail days that require pedaling in, or where you want to bang out some laps when done. Hiking boots are dreadful to ride in, feels like you're wearing wood. Would also mostly solve that wet weather flat shoe problem (there aren't any).

Reply

JVP
+1 Andrew Major
JVP  - Nov. 28, 2018, 10:19 a.m.

Google-fu answered my resole question.  Looks like cobblers can't even get climbing shoe resole kits anymore. Adidas is forcing you to buy new shoes.  Wasteful and lame.

Reply

morgan-heater
0
Morgan Heater  - Nov. 28, 2018, 11:51 a.m.

Rock & Resole in boulder can still get stealth.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, 11:58 a.m.

Lucky! It doesn't sound like there are many (any) options in Vancouver. :(

Reply

Kieran
0
Kieran  - Nov. 28, 2018, 11:19 a.m.

Dam. I'm after new shoes but sick of Five Tens falling apart after 3 months of riding. I was hoping these were the ticket. They are even in my colour :)

For a heavier rider do you think they would make more sense?

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, noon

More weight will definitely force the sole to take the pins a bit more, but I don't believe it will be sufficient. What else have you ridden? I may have experience there that I can help with.

Reply

Kieran
0
Kieran  - Nov. 28, 2018, 12:57 p.m.

Nothing but five tens. They used to be good and last at least 2 seasons. My last pair started to fall apart just 2 months in. I demand better for the bucks they cost.

Reply

Cheez1ts
0
Garrett Thibault  - Nov. 29, 2018, 11:36 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

IslandLife
+2 oudiaou AJ Barlas
IslandLife  - Nov. 28, 2018, 12:18 p.m.

The problem most other companies have is that they don't own the rubber nor the process. They buy/license the rubber... so essentially a rubber company (Vibram) who has invested in the very expensive factory, tooling and processes offers their partner (Giro) a choice of in-house, already created rubbers. Giro picks the one they think will work best for mtbing... (maybe they get to tweak it a bit?), the one they think offers the best combination of durability and sticky-ness.

Obviously after Giro's previous shoe wore out too quickly, they switched to a different choice of rubber from Vibram that was more durable... but then the trade-off was less sticky-ness, and here is the shoe you get. I don't think there is much more they can do beyond investing in their own rubber tech.

I really don't think anyone else is going to be able to touch five ten, who came from the rock climbing world and invested in their rubber tech years and years ago, (and probably patented the shit out their rubber) unless they themselves start from scratch or buy a rubber maker. Or are somehow able to work with some rubber third party out of china who can fully customize a rubber just for them.

I have high hopes for Ride Concepts but we'll have to wait and see. They are using Rubber Kinetics' rubber... which again, is just another third party who also make Goodyear's mtb tires. Though it doesn't look like they are making much else so hopefully it's a true partnership vs just a choice of "off the shelf" rubbers and that they actually need Ride Concepts just as much as Ride Concepts needs them.

For now... as much as I'd like to look elsewhere, when I'm racing enduros on flats, it has to be five ten, nothing else compares... yet. 

I know La Sportiva and Scarpa make rock climbing shoes that are as good or better than anything Five Ten make... it would be cool to see one of those companies jump into the mtb shoe scene.  Mtb shoes really are pretty basic compared with the crazy tech involved in a lot of other sport shoes.  I think if they just brought the rubber and made a copy of this Giro shoe, they'd sell pretty easily.

Reply

agleck7
+1 JVP
Agleck7  - Nov. 28, 2018, 12:33 p.m.

Also, seems like 510 could also offer some different sole versions on their models.  Seems like it would be possible to dial back the grip a little in the name of durability. I know that's kinda what the Stealth xvi vs. regular stealth was, but I wear them both out supper fast.  Even the little dot soles on the DJ shoes wear out super fast in my experience.  Just got a pair of the OG freeriders and those soles feel a little more robust.  If that's true, that sole on the new Freerider Pro upper would be SICK

Reply

JVP
+1 Kieran
JVP  - Nov. 28, 2018, 2:36 p.m.

Yeah, I'm with you Agleck7

We're all obviously frustrated with the shoe situation right now. You have the choice of grip or durability, pick one.

I think five.ten can do this without dialing back grip. The original Impacts lasted great with killer grip! They were too bulky, and were the world's best sponge, but why can't Adidas just take the rubber outsoles from the old impacts, and put them on a more modern midsole and upper like the Freerider Pro? Boom, done!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+2 IslandLife JVP
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 28, 2018, 3:52 p.m.

True. I rode in a pair of Addidas Terrex a few years back and the sole on those seemed more durable too. While it sucks to pay for something that doesn't last as long, I'm not willing to give up the traction. Having your feet stay how you like makes such a difference to comfort and confidence on the trail. I just keep rocking the pin-holed beat to shit shoes well beyond their use-by date to get the value from them. :|

Reply

JVP
+1 AJ Barlas
JVP  - Nov. 28, 2018, 6:20 p.m.

Agreed on grip being mandatory. I find putting some shoe-goo in the pin holes once they start to get too big can keep the current five.ten shoes usable for twice as long and actually restore some of the grip.  It's just two particular pins that kill my shoes, must be where all my weight and twisting force goes.

Reply

Kevin26
0
Kevin26  - Nov. 30, 2018, 3:47 p.m.

3rd choice=clip in

Part of why I've switched to clips lately is my last pair of five tens wore out

Reply

trustywheels
0
trustywheels  - Nov. 29, 2018, 6:35 a.m.

I got a pair of these giros recently, I did find the toe box to be much more snug then 5.10 but that’s liveable. The grip is downright scary though. Aside from the tread depth and rubber tackiness, I found the sole to be very concave with the textured part noticeably raised compared to the very rigid outer ridge. 

The shoes now live in my closet and I use them for yard work, the various pairs of worn out freeriders I have with super worn soles still offering loads more grip.

Reply

pedalhound
+1 AJ Barlas
pedalhound  - Nov. 29, 2018, 10:28 a.m.

I have been running Shimano shoes for many years now Starting with the AM41's and they were great..lasted about 5 years. I replaced them with some AM7's and I wore through the sole in a year (Vibram outsole)...kinda shitty for shoes that cost over $200. I thought about going over to 5.10 but they just don't fit my feet...so I rolled the dice and picked up some GR7's and I really love them. It's been almost a year and they are still holding together well and the Michelin outsole has a good amount of grip, not super sticky but with my plastic Kona Wah Wah 2's I never feel like I need more grip.

Reply

kekoa
0
kekoa  - Nov. 29, 2018, 7:09 p.m.

Sigh.....could you please review things BEFORE I buy them? I just picked up a pair of these in the low cut model and have a ride to get my hair cut in them, a trail ride and a pedal up a road and bomb down ride. I'm a casual flats guy, You can take my Times when you unclick my cold dead toes. 

I figured since it's winter I could work on my manual/jump skills. After my limited time on them, I've found them stiff. Like my feet hurt stiff. Traction has been okay. Previous shoes were the Jackets which I thought were 'meh. 

Give me a couple of months and I suspect that this will be consigned to riding with the kids. 

AJ - what pedals are you using? I'm on RF Chesters.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Nov. 30, 2018, 8 a.m.

They were tested on the Deity TMac and Nukeproof Horizon pedals.

Reply

kekoa
0
kekoa  - Nov. 30, 2018, 8:47 a.m.

Thanks.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - Dec. 2, 2018, 11:08 a.m.

These arrived the day before PB reviewed them.  Two sites have now given them less than favourable reviews.  Hoping the Chromag Scarabs offer enough traction.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.

Trending on NSMB