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FORK SMASH-UP & REVIEW

Foxzocchi Z36 Coil GRIP2 VVC

Words Deniz Merdano
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Mar 2, 2021
Reading time

There is a chromosome responsible for the desire to test out how plush a fork is. You grab your buddy's new bike, get yourself a fistful of front brake and push down hard onto the front wheel. Lift your head up and say... "woah, like buttah. You better service it every 50 hours." There is no denying that forks are getting better and your buddy's brand new zeb-36-ribbon-diamond-durolux-helm will feel smoother than your un-serviced OEM number from last year.

Some of us are in the 'sell the damn bike every year while it is still relevant and upgrade to the newest' camp. I believe more and more people are holding onto their rides from last year because of the serious shortage of low- to mid-end options available right now.

Unless you've abused your bike to the point of no return, there are a ton of improvements you can make to bring your spec up to recent benchmarks. Suspension is one of the second tier of improvements I'd consider after tires and grips. A couple of sticky-rubbered tires and inserts will set you back 350 CAD or so (I'm sure you've got a place on the dark web where you find 80 CAD Maxxgrips but that's just not the norm). Tires, without a doubt, will have the biggest influence on the ride quality of your setup. If you could buy confidence for $100, spending that money on tires will play in your favor.

Suspension upgrades tend to cost a bit more. But it is not unusual to go through hundreds of dollars worth of tires throughout the year. Most suspension upgrades are for life -life of the bike at least. Forks with the newest dampers will set you back 1,000-2,000 CAD at retail.

That's a big price spectrum but the bottom end of that scale is not necessarily a big compromise. So why spend more than necessary? If you have a $1,000 fork, can you squeeze out $2,000 worth of performance out of it, or even improve upon a $2,000 fork?

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Familiar sight to me, with a serious upgrade inside.

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HSR/LSR knobs with a usable range.

I have been smashing through holes and riding the 2020 Marzocchi Z1 Coil for about a year now (see the original review here). That's 4,000 kms - give or take - of BC riding. Rain, mud, snow, dust, loam, countless bike washes, you name it. The $1,000 Z1 Coil works really, really well. The Grip Damper is simple and with simplicity on its side, it offers a supportive and not overly damped ride quality.

Most of my testing was done with the Medium weight spring, good for anyone from 150 - 180 lbs. The preload was left just about fully unwound. The GRIP damper was set to zero compression for the most part. The only time I'd dial it to the halfway mark was when I knew there would be steep trails at hand or heavy compression landings of the 'dorp to falt' nature. If I forgot to set it back to open, the feel of the fork was left relatively similar, apart from top-end sensitivity.

I liked this simplicity. The kind of simplicity that allowed me to focus on other aspects of bike setup like tire pressures, inserts and handlebar compliance. Then as the year progressed, and autumn rolled around , some excellent weather patterns for riding allowed for loam hunting laps. Boy, those were good times and what we built and found was some of the best riding I've ever experienced.

Riding on these loamy trails was a similar sensation to skiing 40cm of deep powder over pillows of snow. There were no massive g-outs if you could time the back of the moguls to push off of. Time it wrong, and you'd be taking a chest full of handlebar at high speeds. The kind of riding where you wanted to find out if you could go faster the next lap. That's when I started to find the bottom of the Z1 in a violent manner.

It is an angry sound finding the end of a coil fork's travel. There is no hydraulic bottom out control and unless you modify the High Speed Compression shim stack, there is no easy way of achieving said 'composure.' I'd dial in half a serving of GRIP damper and would drop into this loamy goodness well aware of the fork's obvious flaw in handling the mid-sized repetitive hits. Small bump sensitivity suffered a a great deal with this compromise.

Riding was still good and the wait times at suspension service centres were longer than I wanted to accept. I put the Firm spring in the fork, fit for a 200-lb rider just to avoid the end stroke violence. No equipment deserved that.

It was when I was offered to test a new bike that the Marzocchi-suspended Forbidden Druid could rest for a few weeks, so I committed to the suspension getting serviced by SuspensionWerx in North Vancouver.

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The test platform is familiar to me. The improvements have been noticeable.

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A thin bead of green Loctite in the CSU to stop future creaks.

It was just a couple of hours later that I got a call from SuspensionWerx; the CSU needed to be warrantied despite there being no obvious creak I could hear while riding. Definitely not a consistent one at least. Off to FOX the fork needed to go for this and I started thinking of Coleman's words about popping a GRIP2 Damper into one of these bad boys.

The GRIP damper, when it was in good shape, offered great ride characteristics. It was when the lack of maintenance caught up with me with that the harsh bottom-outs occurred. I had to see how much neglect the system could take before showing obvious signs of degradation. A brief chat with the guys at FOX confirmed that the upgrade was indeed possible but not something they would do to customers' forks. I understand the plot. A Fox 36 GRIP2 VVC damper with a light rebound tune was on its way into the Z1.

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Beacause, why not.

First Ride

When the fork came back from Fox, I was surprised to see all new lowers as well. There was an undisclosed defect that requred warranty replacement. The first thing I did before turning any dials was to run a thin bead of Green Locktite in the crown and steerer interface underneath the fork. If in theory I could prevent moisture from making it's way in there, I could potentially stop further creaking. Time will prove or disprove this theory.

There I was, with a brand new fork in hand. The only parts that transferred over from the old fork was the axle and the FIRM spring. For the sake of continuity I wanted to keep the firm spring in the equation for a ride or two but setting up the damper was a bit of a shot in the dark. I pulled up the settings for the Air sprung Fox 36 grip2 for a 155lbs rider. Fox recommends 20% sag on a 160mm Fox 36, which equals to 32mm of travel use. In the air world, this would be around 78psi +-2psi

So I started with these settings:

  • Firm Spring
  • No Preload adjustment
  • LSR: 7 clicks
  • HSR: 6 clicks
  • LSC: 10 clicks
  • HSC: 5 clicks

I immediately headed to my test loop which starts with flat, rolling terrain that's great for testing LSC and out of saddle effort. Wallowing forks need not apply here. You need to stay in the sag without bobbing. The GRIP2 damper in the Z1 did what I expected: it kept me up and stable in the mid-stroke and allowed for pressure to be applied to the handlebars. Flat corners were negotiated easily and the small bumps were not robbing my speed.

After 2 minutes of lung busting XC effort, the trail then turns into a chunder-fest in a hurry. Thankfully the grade gets steeper and pedaling is not all that necessary. There are big rocks and rough, armoured sections to negotiate. This is a trail that runs prime when the weather is at its worst. There is sand in the soil so the rain drains though and traction is ample.

The fork felt very composed and steering was precise with ample compliance. The chatter was erased a lot more efficiently compared to the original GRIP damper and the front end seemed to hold a line more stubbornly without much deflection. The fork seemed to recover fast enough for the 4 or 5 drops that sneak up on you after bouncing through some rocks. I was able to preload the chassis without worrying about the remaining travel getting used too quickly. The adjustable high speed compression circuit played a big role in that, especially in a coil sprung fork like this.

After 2 minutes of rough downhill scattered with a few mid-sized drops, we approach a waterfall section. Like a DH worldcup track, there are multiple line choices and the straight line is the fastest and the roughest. I usually aim for that. Taking the roughest line choice that allows for ample exit speed so I put my fate in the GRIP2 and exited the water-damaged section without much worry. There were no spectators to cheer me on, so I proceeded at 80% effort.

When the trail was done, my timing device alerted me to a new PR. This was a bit of a surprise considering the lack of sensation of speed on the ride. I didn't even feel like I was pushing the limits of traction. My hands were a little tired, so my mind was curious about a spring swap. But a PR obviously meant that I was on the right track. I was hesitant to go down a spring rate, but I wanted more comfort for my hands so I dropped the Medium spring back in to the chassis, a 5-minute job once back at home.

I did some non-scientific math to adjust the damper settings to compensate for the increased sag. Here's where that ended up:

  • Medium Spring
  • 2 turns of preload
  • LSR: 8 clicks
  • HSR: 7 clicks
  • LSC: 12 clicks
  • HSC: 4 clicks
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A couple of days later, back on the same trail, another PR was attained. The change to a lighter (medium) spring was welcomed by my battered hands. It was noticeably easier to hold onto the bars and the front wheel seemed to move out of the way more easily to generate traction on the rough stuff.

The "Fun meter" O-ring showed 90% travel use which was also welcomed as I was worried I would be blowing through the last bit of the travel on the medium spring. The HSC has seemed to work its magic on high shaft speed impacts. I will move a couple of clicks north or south on the rebound circuits depending on temperature and conditions.

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I'll argue that the M arch is hotter than the F arch.

Value Proposition

Is all this adjustability worth 500 CAD? That depends on where you start. I love a coil-sprung bike. The chassis stability the coil suspension offers far outweighs the disadvantages on the scale, but adding about a pound on either end of the bike is not on everybody's agenda. For me though, if the system is designed for it, I'll go for it.

Finding the correct spring weight is a bit of a struggle too, but once it's figured out, the deviation from the settings are far smaller, and the bike is just about always ready for a rip no matter the weather and altitude. If your bike came with a Marzocchi Z1 air/coil or a Fox 36/38 Performance or Rhythm fork, the GRIP2 VVC upgrade is heck of a lot cheaper than dishing out for a new fork in these times when supply is so short on so many components. The Marzocchi variants even allow for a coil/air spring swap for maximum customization.

What if you already have a GRIP2 damper on the front end of your bike? Does a coil upgrade make sense for about $500? AJ dove in to the Vorsprung Suspension option a while back. He is an outspoken advocate for coil suspension, too. I love the idea of a Fox-branded coil fork (the bleed valves on the lowers should be used by all manufacturers). Cam took the Push ACS3 to the trails with great success. There are options to coil up a stock GRIP2/Charger 2.1 damper fork.

There is a MRP Ribbon coil-sprung bike in the test fleet right now that further solidifies my affection for spiralling bits in the fork legs. I think for a Fox/Marzocchi OEM warrior, the GRIP2 upgrade is a no-brainer for challenging terrain. The installation process is no harder than servicing the lowers; no special tools necessary thanks to the semi-open bath design.

Make sure you have the new PTFE fork oil at hand and dive right in.

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The Vorsprung Smashpot coil kit fits various forks. Photo: AJ Barlas

Push ACS3 Coil Conversion kit

Push Industries ACS3 Coil conversion. Photo: AJ Barlas

Conclusion

You may not be in the market for a new ride this year or next, but there are significant improvements to be made to the bike you already own. The cross-compatibility of suspension improvements are better than ever. Do you think you can squeeze more performance out of your 2021 ride?

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano

Photog

5'9"

155lbs

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Comments

jdw103
+3 IslandLife Deniz Merdano ollyh
Jason West  - March 2, 2021, 3:33 a.m.

My Smashpot should be arriving tomorrow for my F36 and l am very excited to install that bad boy and coil on! #coilon

Reply

denomerdano
+2 Jason West ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:44 a.m.

Excellent! Let us know how the installation and break-in period goes!

Reply

Heinous
+3 Deniz Merdano Jason West ollyh
Heinous  - March 2, 2021, 3:21 p.m.

I've been running a Smashpot in a Grip2 36 for a couple of years. It's ruined other forks for me - the plushness, mid stroke and the easily adjustable bottom out has made me faster everywhere. It's most noticeable on cold days, I jumped on another bike after fitting the smashpot and immediately thought it needed a warranty it felt so sticky, slow and harsh. 

I'm about to run an experiment and drop it to 130mm for my singlespeed and see how it copes.

Reply

denomerdano
+2 AJ Barlas ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 7:51 p.m.

I love the cold days where air sprung buddies complain about dead forks when I look at them all puzzled.. love the coil consistency

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 ollyh
AJ Barlas  - March 4, 2021, 1:10 p.m.

As they clamber for their shock pumps and try to get things feeling right. :D

Reply

neologisticzand
+3 Agleck7 Deniz Merdano ollyh
Chad K  - March 2, 2021, 6:08 a.m.

My question is, do you think upgrading from a GRIP to GRIP2 Damper is the same worthy upgrade for an air sprung fork? That's something I've been going back and forth on but haven't decided whether I'll make the upgrade or not. 

For now, I've at least spent the money to get a digital shock pump to really dial in my suspension pressures.

Reply

roil
+2 Mammal ollyh
roil  - March 2, 2021, 9:25 a.m.

Same boat as you. I'm leaning towards getting a Diaz Runt + their damper tuning kit.

https://diazsuspensiondesign.com/runt

Reply

mammal
+2 roil ollyh
Mammal  - March 2, 2021, 2:29 p.m.

That's cool. Basically an IRT (Manitou) system for your Fox fork.

Reply

neologisticzand
+2 roil ollyh
Chad K  - March 3, 2021, 6:16 a.m.

I forgot the Runt even existed! That's definitely something else to look into on my end, thanks!

Reply

denomerdano
+3 AJ Barlas Heinous ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:46 a.m.

If I was on an air sprung grip fork, I would upgrade to coil if I was past the warranty period. Then a damper upgrade would be next. Spread over 2 years,.the cost would be palatable

Reply

Timmigrant
+1 ollyh
Tim Coleman  - March 2, 2021, 10:36 p.m.

I changed the damper in my Z1 Air from GRIP to the GRIP2 and I really liked the improvement. Much like Deniz mentioned in this article the GRIP2 allowed me to run more low speed compression, without the fork feeling harsh. This meant the fork was more supportive cornering and under braking, but also produced more grip, and feel less harsh. I REALLY like the Z1 Air and Coil with the GRIP2 damper.

Reply

Sean_D
+3 Deniz Merdano mrbrett ollyh
Sean_D  - March 2, 2021, 7:05 a.m.

"A brief chat with the guys at FOX confirmed that the upgrade was indeed possible but not something they would do to customer's forks. I understand the plot." 

How does this make sense. If the part is compatible, wouldn't you want to expand your market for upgrades to owners of the Fox made Marzocchi forks? I don't feel like this would dilute the Fox brand as pretty much everyone that cares already knows Marzocchis are now made by Fox.

I'm also surprised that they haven't offered coil-conversions for their own forks, instead letting demand be answered by PUSH and Vorsprung. Seems like they would simply need to produce a second size of coil sleeve to be compatible with the Fox CSUs.

Reply

denomerdano
+2 IslandLife Tim Coleman
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:48 a.m.

I'm sure there is a massive internal battle for these kinds of situations at bike companies.

Fox didn't require a massive push to get the damper installed, I think it would be a case by case scenario depending on the region.

You could easily order the damper and have your shop install it under an hour.

Reply

craigwu
+1 Deniz Merdano
Craig Wu  - March 2, 2021, 7:56 a.m.

You may have your HSC/LCS settings reversed? My 2021 Grip2 VVC damper on my Fox 36 has 8 clicks of HSC adjustment and 16 clicks of LSC.

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:50 a.m.

The click settings are calculated from fully closed(wound in, slow) 

What is your weight and spring pressure?

Reply

craigwu
+1 Deniz Merdano
Craig Wu  - March 2, 2021, 2:24 p.m.

I’m 145lbs and run 67psi in my 2021 Fox 36. HSC 7 LSC 14, HSR 8 LSR 12. Clicks from closed.

Reply

denomerdano
+2 Craig Wu ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 3:36 p.m.

OMG yes.. twice too..

Thanks for the heads up

Reply

leon-forfar
+2 Craig Wu Deniz Merdano
leon-forfar  - March 2, 2021, 3:18 p.m.

He meant that you have the two mixed up. HSC doesn't have 10 clicks (8 clicks on HSC and HSR) as written above.

Reply

frazam
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
frazam  - March 2, 2021, 7:56 a.m.

Any maintenance issues with the Druid over those 4000kms?

Reply

denomerdano
+1 ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:51 a.m.

No issues, a new idler at 4000km. Bearings are still the originals , no problems! 

I have some small mods, improvements to the small things..

Reply

frazam
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
frazam  - March 2, 2021, 6:22 p.m.

Awesome - thanks for the info. As a new druid owner this is great to hear!

Reply

Ripmoslow
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
Ripmoslow  - March 2, 2021, 8:03 a.m.

I have seriously been considering a Z1 coil. The only thing dissuading me is the limited springs. 

At 135lbs would the medium spring running no preload work?

It sounds like everyone running this fork runs a stiffer spring than recommended. Maybe the medium would work well for a lightweight like me? I don’t want to run the light spring with preload at max....

Reply

Tremeer023
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
Tremeer023  - March 2, 2021, 8:15 a.m.

I've had this fork (Z1 coil 150mm) for a few months but only about 3 or 4 rides so far.  I'm around  185lbs and the firm spring feels spot on although I'm still playing with the settings.  So far ive had to turn the rebound almost all the way in (which is unusual compared with previous forks ive had) to stop it from feeling too loose.  

I wondered if the Grip 2 damper would offer more refinement so may have to try this upgrade.  I've heard people say they prefer the Grip 1 as it stays more supple (less to interfere with the stroke), but if anything my fork feels TOO supple once it gets past the initial 30% or so of travel.

Reply

IslandLife
+3 Tremeer023 Deniz Merdano ollyh
IslandLife  - March 2, 2021, 8:48 a.m.

After owning a 2020 Fox36 Grip2, then a 2021 Fox36 Grip2 w/ VVC and now a Fox38 Grip2 w/ VVC... the differences between the 2020 Grip2 and 2021 Grip2 are surprising, the changes they made along with the addition of VVC, I think, basically makes it a different fork.  And then there's the version in the 38... which, crazily enough, is even better.

I actually didn't find the 2020 36 Grip2 that great of a fork (comparatively of course... it's still an awesome fork), I came from an MRP Ribbon Air and perhaps expected too much??  I could see why some people might have preferred Grip1 or even Fit4 to the 2020 Grip2.

As for the 2021 version.. I'm in love.

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 11:29 a.m.

I don't have a bike that warrants the need for a 38, but if I did.. I'd be all over that!

Reply

Timmigrant
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
Tim Coleman  - March 2, 2021, 10:46 p.m.

That's interesting feedback. I had a 2020 Grip2 damper in a Z1, 36 and a 40. Then the GRIP2 VVC in the 36, 38 and 40. I noticed the changes with the VVC, but it didn't make a big improvement in the ride characteristics with the settings I'm running. I still like the GRIP2 VVC, my 2021 38 is FANTASTIC, but I still think the GRIP2 damper is a most excellent damper.

Reply

IslandLife
+2 Tim Coleman ollyh
IslandLife  - March 3, 2021, 9:13 a.m.

I think part of the changes that I appreciated was how much more useable and tune-able the damper in the 2021 versions are.  I just never seemed to find a setting I was really happy with using the 2020 version, never-mind being able to adjust the damper to different days/terrain/conditions.  I also had the trapped-air-stuck-down issue a couple of times with that fork.  The first time, it took me awhile to figure out wtf was going on and it basically ruined a park day for me (so maybe some bitterness creeping in, ha).  Don't think I'll own a fork without bleeders in the future.  Had the same issue with a Yari and a Lyrik in the past as well.  And obviously, not with the Ribbon  Not a huge deal to remedy once you know what's going on and figure out how to remedy the situation, but a PIA anyway.

I've found with 2021 version... it was much easier to find a place that I was very happy with while at the same time still retaining the ability to change settings to accommodate different styles of riding, terrain and conditions.

And ya, fully agree... the 38 really is next level.  I just have so much more front end composure and confidence with that thing.  I'm having so much fun just throwing my front wheel into insane situations with reckless abandon and it seems to just sort everything out.  But it's even in the slower and techier sections of trail where I notice a pretty big difference as well where it just tracks and goes where I point it so much easier and it goes about it's job of soaking things up vs deflecting.  Something I didn't really seem to notice before the 38.  It just makes riding my bike easier... love it.

Reply

denomerdano
+1 ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:58 a.m.

Get two springs.. medium and light. You will most likely be fine on the medium but light with a couple of turns of preload would give you more supple ride for slippery situations..

Reply

Ripmoslow
0
Ripmoslow  - March 2, 2021, 10:26 a.m.

Thanks

Reply

mrbrett
+2 Deniz Merdano Tremeer023
mrbrett  - March 2, 2021, 11:39 a.m.

As a Z1 coil guy as well, I would say that if you are on the fringes of a weight range, you should also target what travel you want to run. Since travel changes with a Z1 are just a matter of swapping some spacers around, it's easy to do and requires no parts. But it also means if you're between spring rates you might choose to go up or down depending on your travel.

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 11:42 a.m.

Excellent point, one I thought about but forgot to mention.

Reply

Ripmoslow
0
Ripmoslow  - March 2, 2021, 12:35 p.m.

I should have mentioned that. 160 mm on a Ripmo AF

Reply

Vikb
+7 IslandLife Pete Roggeman Tremeer023 JVP AJ Barlas Velocipedestrian ollyh
Vik Banerjee  - March 2, 2021, 8:27 a.m.

For most people just doing regular lower services would be a great improvement. The topic of fork service came up on a ride earlier this year. One guy asked where I got my damper serviced [Vorsprung], one guy proudly proclaimed he had not serviced either end of his FS bike since he bought it two years ago [subtlety implying suspension service was #FAKEnews!] and one lady perked up and inquired "You are supposed to service your fork?!?!".

Next up would be people actually doing some effective setup work on their suspension. It's shocking [pun intended] how many times I grab a bike on the trail and the suspension is not even close to where it should be for the rider in question. Not even counting the "Why are you riding with your fork and shock locked out on the downhills?" moments. It's kind of sad to think about all the effort that goes into designing suspension for mountain bikes and then what actually happens to it once sold to most customers.

I've had custom damper tunes done on a few shocks and really enjoyed the results. For some reason I have not done that at the front of the bike. I try to stay on top of maintenance, but I've left everything stock. I have a hankering to try something a bit more "fancy" next time I build a new FS bike.

Reply

tehllama42
+1 Vik Banerjee
Tehllama42  - March 2, 2021, 9:38 a.m.

I resemble that first statement... yet here I am wanting to drop a new Fit4 damper in my ancient Fox32 setup.

I have found a solid setup on it as-is, and since it still sees most of its miles on pavement, I'm still on the fence, but this actually does make me feel pretty good about having invested enough time to get the right setup (complete with oil spacing on the air spring).

Reply

thaaad
+4 AJ Barlas Tim Coleman Vik Banerjee ollyh
thaaad  - March 2, 2021, 1:08 p.m.

The amount of CSUs and bushings I've replaced from people who said things like "I haven't serviced it in 3 years and it's still running great!", black oil, torn bladders, bent shims, worn damper and air shafts, corroded lowers from worn out dust wipers, destroyed bottom out bumpers, seized controls, stuck down air springs... and on and on.

Service your suspension folks.

Reply

mhaager2
0
Moritz Haager  - March 2, 2021, 8:42 a.m.

I wonder how much of an upgrade a grip2 damper would provide over my grip Fox34, and vs upgrading to a Fox 36 grip2.

Reply

Shoreloamer
0 JVP thaaad
Greg Bly  - March 2, 2021, 8:49 a.m.

The first fork failed . Do to your careful communication and exelent relationship with the bike industry you got a whole new fork. 

Does not work that way in the real world for most of us. 

I bet if you rode three identical fox 36 forks or 3 Zebs that are identical they would all feel different with the exact same settings. 

Shitty quality control.  So we have warranties. Great.

Reply

denomerdano
+3 Tim Coleman thaaad ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 11:32 a.m.

I think an excellent relationship with your local bike shop will also mean you'd get the same warranty service.

Most bike shops here on the North Shore have a good standing with Fox and Rockshox.

any customer who has a proof of purchase would get the same warranty experience I got. In the grand scheme of things, I am a small fish in the bike industry. I do have soft talking manners and a friendly approach to my phone and email conversations, which no doubt helps my cause.

Have you had a bad warranty experience ?

Reply

Timmigrant
+1 ollyh
Tim Coleman  - March 2, 2021, 10:52 p.m.

Deniz already covered his warranty experience, and I can comment on consistency. 

I rode three 29er BoXXer WCs in the space a couple weeks. One was for review, one was on a test bike, and one was on purchase bike. I dialed in the same settings on all three, and was very surprised at how close they rode. Same deal with the Lyriks I've ridden on test bikes. 

As for Fox stuff, I've ridden a number of GRIP2 and GRIP2 VVC forks; Z1s, 36s, 38s and 40s and again the consistency has been fantastic.

Reply

fed
0
fed  - March 2, 2021, 10:15 a.m.

A year and a half ago I had installed a Push ACS3 coil kit and a HC97 damper on my 2017 Lyrik and i could not be happier. If you don't my mind the half or pound gain weight is so worth it, to be honest i really didn't notice extra the weight.  So composed and consistent, close to 2K miles and no service need it yet that i can perceived.  Coil is definitely worth the try if you ride park, enduro or Gnarly trails, happy riding people!!!!

Reply

denomerdano
+1 ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 11:35 a.m.

When I had a 2019 Yari on my Trek , My internal battle was if a coil conversion or a charger damper upgrade would be worth the coin. 

the Motion control damper was easy to work with and performed relatively well. But the temptation to have more dials were high.

I think overall the coil upgrade would have been a more noticeable upgrade

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+2 Pete Roggeman ollyh
Sanesh Iyer  - March 2, 2021, 2:04 p.m.

Love it! Thanks for doing the swap. I considered it, then just went full pull 38 Factory. After rereading the vorsprung and push coil kit reviews, I'd love to see a head to head. I also think the 38 would make a better fork to swap, as I imagine the coil to air can be reversed given that it's a cartridge air spring. The weight penalty would also be less.

After putting some time in on my storia, I've come to love the HBC. I wasn't sure exactly how it would feel, I bought it mostly out of nerdery, but it really does stabilize the deep stroke. I would have liked an Arma just to try the HBC adjuster too (though HBC + Lok is clutch, as you can run it soft and open but have some platform for the grinds). That said, I notice a lot of interplay between spring rate, HSC, LSC, HBC, and Lok. The HBC let's me run less HSC and a softer spring than I feel I'd otherwise need. And that's on the rear with leverage kinematics helping out. I imagine HBC would have even more effect on the front, eliminating the tradeoffs between suppleness and control, similar to AJ's experience of the smashpot. 

That was a huge digression. I'm super excited about the flexibility of this platform. Would love to see head to head damper and spri reviews on a single chassis to independently score them.

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denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 3:51 p.m.

What frame did you end up on Sanesh?

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sanesh-iyer
+2 Deniz Merdano ollyh
Sanesh Iyer  - March 2, 2021, 4:44 p.m.

Titan! Medium. Its terrifyingly fast and stable. I need to get used to the substantial increase in stay length (+25mm or so). Loving the body position on steeps, there's no slow speed option for drops or jumps. You have to Huck. Not a bad thing.

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andrewfif
+2 Sanesh Iyer ollyh
Andrew  - March 2, 2021, 8:54 p.m.

Super true about the huck. That bike only has one mode-full on. Enjoy

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denomerdano
+2 Sanesh Iyer ollyh
Deniz Merdano  - March 2, 2021, 9:15 p.m.

With stays that long, surely you can just roll it...

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sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - March 2, 2021, 10 p.m.

And, not only does it have the geo for full on, it has the suspension to keep it composed. Im already feeling it open doors in my riding.

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hbelly13
+1 ollyh
Raymond Epstein  - March 3, 2021, 7:06 a.m.

I think I actually have the real Foxzocchi as the person I bought my Factory 36 pulled the damper out and replaced it with the Sweep damper from his Z1. So his is like what is described here and mine is the real deal. Hahahaha! Silliness aside, it is a great riding fork that suits my set and forget approach well.

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WalterWhite
+1 ollyh
WalterWhite  - March 3, 2021, 4:46 p.m.

I have a newly built Z1 coil with Grip2 damper and it is pretty much the best fork I’ve ever ridden. I’ve had many coil and air forks and nothing compares, though the 38 is quite good.

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Mtnrambler
0
Mtnrambler  - March 18, 2021, 1:34 p.m.

Hi all,  I want to put a 2021 grip2 in my 2020 Z1, but I called fox and was told that it’s not possible because the Z1 uses a rhythm csu.  Can anyone tell me the fox part number of the damper they’ve successfully used?  Thanks so much!

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