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Results from the Dirt Lab

Experiments with CushCore and Tannus Inserts

Words Cam McRae
Photos Cam McRae
Date May 19, 2020
Reading time

Compromises are a fact of life. Want a promotion? Better suck up to your jerk of a boss. Or get him or her fired. You must get fit? There is no substitute for hours of pain and sweat. Except drugs. I want it all however, without compromise, and I was prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice of installing tire inserts up to 8 times to achieve this goal. Which sounds like I've been compromised.

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A Tannus insert with a Tubolito S-Tubo slid inside. It seems like it would be easily accomplished, but it was not. The S-Tubo saves 200g over a conventional tube easily. They aren't cheap, but show me another way you can save that much weight for less than $40 USD?

I was seeking an insert solution without the usual weight penalty, with two different insert types. Tannus and CushCore approach the problem from different angles. CushCore, which is likely the best known insert at this point, is shaped like a teacup by cross section and it occupies the space closest to the rim and supports sidewalls. It is a tubeless solution that requires sealant and good rim sealing but the foam layer prevents flats by putting a cushion between the impact and your rim. As you can imagine, the system protects your rim in the process and can be run flat with remarkable capability.

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It was a little work getting the tube into the insert, but the rest of the install is quite simple.

Tannus is like a foam tire within your tire. It is a foam liner that presses against the inside of your tire. It diverges further by using a tube instead of a tubeless valve and sealant. If you put a thorn through your tire, you won't go flat unless said thorn goes through both the Tannus insert and the tube. Otherwise you'll be none the wiser. Tannus isn't light at 330 grams apiece, and adding a tube can easily add another 250g making the whole thing a little ridiculous.

My angle with both tires was to use lighter than recommended tires that wouldn't be appropriate for riding on the North Shore without some sort of modification, like inserts. To get Tannus closer to Cush Core I was going to use Tubolito tubes, which weigh just 40g. Between everything I was hopeful to eliminate the weight penalty while reaping many of the benefits of inserts, which does not include smooth installation.

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I had high hopes for these anemic looking Pirelli tires that weigh only 880 grams.

Tannus was up first. The install isn't too bad but some fiddling is required. This was compounded by the filmy shapeless nature of Tubolito's S-Tubo 40 gram tubes. Getting them to seat inside the liner was like playing whack-a-mole, but eventually I got there. The first ride was a bit of a bust, I think because I hadn't adequately tightened the valve. I'm not certain this was the problem, but I couldn't find any punctures in the tube after a thorough dunking. Despite the lack of culprit, I decided it made more sense to put the hefty Tube MTB in the rear, weighing in at a whopping 85 grams. I had no problems after that.

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Before too long it was time to replace the Pirelli with these Bontragers. When experimenting the goal is to fail quickly.

Based on my initial CushCore experiences, when I used truly flimsy and wholly unsuitable Mavic Quest Pro XL 29 x 2.35 tires. They were under 800 grams each and were basically semi-slicks. I don't know quite what I was thinking in retrospect, since I hadn't ridden CushCore ever before, but it turns out I was onto something. The pressures I was able to run, combined with the excellent sidewall support for cornering, turned dumpster tires into a decent option, as long as things didn't get too sloppy. I could ride them in pretty much any situation and do okay, and in the dry there was almost no issue at all. Of course dry around here is a rare and temporary condition, but the experience had given me an idea. If I could get my mitts on relatively light tires with aggressive and well-spaced knobs, rubber enlightenment might be achieved.

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The road up Seymour has been closed to cars, and even pedestrians officially, but bikes are allowed. Trail choice is somewhat limited but we're lucky to be able to get out.

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Wheels for this exploration were WeAreOne Faction (425g, 27mm internal width) laced onto Shimano XTR9100 hubs. The test bike used was the Yeti SB150 seen above.

I dreamed of rubber under 900 grams that was basically all knobs, and with decent volume. My wish list was a tough ask in 29 howver and I began with a pair of 29 x 2.4 Pirelli Scorpion R Tires weighing 880 grams each. Based on my initial Tannus experience, I expected to be able to run lower pressure without losing much grip or cornering bite. That first ride on Tannus was on burlier E13 TRSr tires, rubber I was more than happy to run without any performance enhancement, and the results didn't compare. The Pirellis were not up to the task with Tannus. To achieve decent grip I had to drop quite a lot of pressure, but when I did cornering precision went out the window and I managed to bottom out my rim loudly enough to make me cringe more than once. And still the grip was unsatisfactory.

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These wouldn't have been my fantasy choice to the tire solution I posed. They were heavier than I'd hoped, had only moderately aggressive knobs, and could have been higher volume. Bontrager SE5 Team Issue 29 x 2.4s. Next time I'd choose Maxxis DHR IIs in 29 x 2.6 at the same weight, assuming the rear fits my bike.

I repeated the installation process, slightly more smoothly, with a set of Bontrager SE5 Team Issue 29 x 2.4s. Their width measured somewhat below 2.4", they were more portly than I was hoping for as well at 1060 and 1100 grams, and I would have preferred taller and more aggressive knobs, but otherwise they were perfect. Or at least adequate.

Performance improved over the Pirellis, and grip improved, but there was no comparison between this set up and the WTB combo I'd replaced. Traction wasn't as positive, cornering bite wasn't great at the range of pressures I tried, but grip was adequate. I began to realize that Tannus doesn't provide sidewall support that comes anywhere close to what I'd experienced with CushCore, and that higher pressures were required to provide enough support for a tire with a less robust carcass. The weight challenge was a success however, compared to what they replaced.

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CushCore installs aren't as bad as many people make them out to be, and with the Bead Dropper, the process is much better than it was before.

The WTB Verdict and Judge combo I was running came in as a complete wheel with rotors and cassette at 2260 grams front and 2895 grams rear on WeAreOne Faction rims with XTR hubs. The Tannus/Bontrager/Tubolito combo was 2140 grams front and 2680 rear. Weight without performance means nothing for the kind of riding I enjoy, so this combo will be identified as a failure.

I didn't see any point in trying CushCore with the Pirelli tires, because I'd already had a similar experience, so I mounted them up with the Bontrager SE5s and around 100ml of fluid. This was my second CushCore install and it went better than ever, thanks to CushCore's Bead Dropper tool. It was still tricky getting the CushCore around the rim, and then getting the tire around the CushCore, but the final mounting steps were a revelation.

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This is probably the hardest part of installing CushCore (mounting it on the rim) if you've got a Bead Dropper, because the rest becomes pretty straightforward.

I started off using the bead dropper to push the bead as deeply as possible into the rim channel with the hook facing toward the rim. Eventually I turned it around so the hook was away from the rim and it became easier and more effective. I dropped the rim all the way around on one side and then easily pushed the tire into place with only my fingers. The tougher second side took a little more effort but once again I could easily mount the side without any tools after the bead was dropped.

I hadn't spent much time on CushCore since I initially wrote about the experience in 2017. Generally I'm testing tires, wheels or a complete bikes, and using CushCore throws everything off. It makes all tires pretty good, protects rims from damage, and changes with way a bike rides because of the damping characteristics and sidewall support. It isn't fair. So I was eager to give them another try and see if my impressions had evolved in three years.

Right away the difference in sidewall support of CushCore was evident. Even running 16 psi rear and 14 front, the tires dug in reasonably and were precise both when angled and moving straight ahead. Grip was also hefty considering the relatively modest profile of the tires, and much better than my previous experience on the Mavic rubber. Wet or dry the traction I could generate was comparable to the much burlier, knobbier and more substantial WTB Verdict/Judge combo.

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The Bead Dropper is a great all around tire lever, assuming you are leaving it at home. Turning the hook away from the rim was the most effective way to push the bead down into the centre channel of the rim.

The most marked characteristic of CushCore for me is the damped ride. Because the insert takes up a significant portion of the air volume, the remaining volume ramps up more quickly, just as adding a spacer does the same to your fork. Once you push through that cushion the foam insert conforms to match the terrain producing a supple feel and a satisfyingly muted sound. The pleasures of CushCore came flooding back to me and I was able to ride very well (for me) in some snotty circumstances on some very steep and burly terrain. On loose terrain I might have had slightly less bite and control than with the WTBs, but in most other situations, including slick granite slabs and slimy roots, the traction offered is similar.

In the end, while my lightweight experiment with Tannus failed to produce results, I remain a fan of the product for some uses. If punctures are all but unavoidable where you live, these should make a dramatic difference. With a good tire with a supportive sidewall, Tannus gives a very solid, damped and high grip ride. Getting rid of sealant is a huge bonus as well, Tubolito drops the weight but a full pound overall, but running lower pressures and tires with less gallant sidewalls won't likely make you smile.

My feelings about CushCore however have been reinforced and amplified by this experience. Today I was in some very fast and rough corners, wondering how my grip would be despite my low pressure tire setup, and the tires dug in admirably. If you are looking for more traction, rim protection, and the ability to ride out on a flat without damaging rim or tire, CushCore could be for you.

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Age - 54

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 165lbs/75kg

Ape Index - 0.986

Inseam - 33"/84cm

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Fifth Horseman

Bar Width - 770mm

Preferred Reach - 475-490mm

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Comments

dbozman
0
dbozman  - May 19, 2020, 5:45 a.m.

The tire damping characteristics of CC are really what it's about for me, particularly riding big chunk in Phoenix at speed. I wouldn't call the tire install "painless," but it's relatively straightforward with most tires. I've installed several different Maxxis and Bontrager tires fairly easily. This past weekend, I met my match in a Conti Trail King. I was down to the last 10 inches of bead on the second side. Multiple broken Pedro's levers, zip ties and velcro bindings later, I gave up.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 19, 2020, 9:10 a.m.

Bead Dropper FTW!

Reply

Brigham_Rupp
+1 Cam McRae
Brigham_Rupp  - May 19, 2020, 7:37 a.m.

I had the same experience running cushcore when I lived in Arizona. Great ride characteristics and rim protection was a bonus. I moved to southern Oregon last year and removed the CC after a few weeks. The climbs are too steep and the trails are so buff... it stopped being worth the weight penalty for me, improved feel aside. I am curious about trying the XC version though.

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RAHrider
0
Reed Holden  - May 19, 2020, 10:51 p.m.

My experience with the XC version is that they give more than 50% of the damping but less than 25% of the sidewall support. I used them in 2.4 tires on derby rims, which I know is less than ideal but it's my only 29 wheelset.

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Kenny
+1 Cam McRae
Kenny  - May 19, 2020, 8:10 a.m.

Have you tried nukeproof ARD? 

I just purchased some, waiting for them to arrive. 

Some people say they're nearly useless but many reports suggest that given the fact that they only weigh 100g each and are around $80 CAD per pair, they're a reasonable compromise, which sounds kinda like what you might be looking for. 

I'm curious to give them a go.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 19, 2020, 5:13 p.m.

Interesting. I'll check those out. Thanks!

Reply

3pac6pac
+1 Cam McRae
PJ McConkey  - May 19, 2020, 7:50 p.m.

A buddy and I split a set to use on the rear only.  Most reviews complained that u can hear the insert rattle a little bit when at low pressure.  I have found that to be the case if I don't check the pressure before I ride and it is at 22 or lower.  But I am 220lbs fully geared up and I usually run 26 or so in the rear and I cant hear them rattling.. I ride fromme mostly and smash stuff pretty hard on a 29er reign, haven't gotten a dent or loose spoke since November, riding at least twice a week.

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Kenny
0
Kenny  - May 21, 2020, 7:27 a.m.

Cool. I'm a similar use case except this will go on the rear of my hardtail with a 2.8 tire. I've pretty much resigned myself to having to shorten it after a dozen rides or so. Annoying but is what it is. If I can run a few psi less without rim mangling or major squirming I'll be happy! 

Seems shipping speed from chain reaction during these covid days is painfully slow though!

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3pac6pac
0
PJ McConkey  - May 21, 2020, 11:32 a.m.

Reply

craw
+3 Tadpoledancer Tehllama42 andyf
Cr4w  - May 19, 2020, 9:46 a.m.

So now that Cush Core has proven its value surely the next evolutionary step Is for tire manufacturers to add something to the tire casings themselves? If the ride benefits justify an extra 300g then surely we could do 150g built into the casing?

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JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - May 19, 2020, 10:56 p.m.

Schwable calls it super gravity. it's excellent.

Reply

cedrico
+1 dan_l
cedrico  - May 20, 2020, 6:57 a.m.

Tires with tough casing and without inserts are not comparable to tires with lighter casing and with Cushcore inserts. The later will have less rolling resistance, better traction, and probably just as good if not better rim protection.

Reply

agleck7
+1 Cam McRae
Agleck7  - May 20, 2020, 7:12 a.m.

That's the theory, but I'd love to test back to back

Reply

JVP
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
JVP  - May 19, 2020, 10:20 a.m.

Installing CushCore is easy, until it isn't. This was my 6th? go at it. Most were easy, two of them damn near drove me mad. A new MagicMary SuperG on WTB i29 rim sucks. The new tire is waxy and stiff, and getting it started on the second bead is the hard part, just wanted to pop back fully open whenever I started to put the bead inside the rim. A third hand would have made it super easy.

Getting the old, properly fermented tire off, that lever would really help. I about poked a hole through my hand pushing so hard on a little tiny plastic lever. Beads were basically superglued on after the DH wheelset sat in my garage all winter. 

I need that lever, and wearing leather gloves really helped grip the waxy new tire. Weird how slick it was on bare hands.

Reply

Turttle
+1 JVP
Turttle  - May 19, 2020, 11:29 a.m.

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0519

Motion Pro Beady Buddy. These recently saved the day for me on a Cush Core setup that had sat around for about a year, and the tire was glued to rim. They are anodized aluminum and left no trace on my XM481 rims. Kinda expensive though.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 JVP
Cam McRae  - May 22, 2020, 12:17 a.m.

I've recently discovered a technique that hasn't yet failed me. I forgo the levers entirely to break a stubborn bead, and like you I wear gloves. With the wheel upright and perpendicular to me sitting on a chair, I grab as much tire as a I can and pull it toward me, while simultaneously pushing the rim away, folding it over the closest edge of the rim. This has the miraculous effect of releasing the bead on the side furthest from you. It's so simple I felt like an idiot when I stumbled onto it. It has taken some effort on occasion, but I'm talking 30 seconds of effort rather than 20 minutes of banging my head against a wall. I haven't yet entered the ring with a DH tire that's been marinating for 2 years, but I'm unreasonably confident considering my results so far. If you make it work I'd love to hear about it.

Reply

Glass
0
Glass  - May 24, 2020, 4:40 a.m.

Could you do a video showing the technique? I have an Assegai with cushcore and an inner tube on a wtb i35 rim which I haven't been able to remove in 3 months. Just order the cushcore bead dropper to see if it helps.

Reply

HeadOverHandlebars
+1 Cam McRae
Adam Grice  - May 19, 2020, 11:12 a.m.

I've been running tannus armor on my park bike with magic marys. Wire bead and whatever they call their thickest casing. The main thing I was looking for was flat protection, and they've held up so far. One thing to note is that the foam compresses pretty severely after being in the tire for a while, reducing the damping effect. They still ride pretty nicely, but not quite as well as I expected. Still a good price and effective flat protection, but I think its really better for dh bikes. 

I've been running nukeproof ARDs on my trail hardtail with wtb vigi front/trail boss rear, tough casings all around, and have been pleased with the rim protection so far, and they're pretty easy to install. Never tried cushcore, and don't really intend to. The price and installation have been keeping me away.

Reply

rwalters
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
Ryan Walters  - May 19, 2020, 12:23 p.m.

A great explanation of how Cush Cores ride Cam. I think it's best to look at tires/inserts/rims as a system that has to work together. For the conditions I ride in (north shore), I've found that carbon rims (NOBL TR38), Maxxis MaxxGrip with EXO sidewalls along with Cush Cores is the perfect combination. This combo results in a strong AF wheel, amazing grip and ride, and weight isn't too bad.

Maybe if I rode somewhere with sharper, loose rocks (i.e.: BC interior), I'd be more worried about slashed sidewalls.

Reply

taprider
+1 Cam McRae
taprider  - May 19, 2020, 12:28 p.m.

How about Pepi's Rokline (the yellow enduro ones) at 100 gm with valve per tire.  They seem very durable, even after rides with 0 psi because my rim tape wouldn't stick. And you won't have as much of a weight penalty.  The old red and new pink 3-lobe-shaped Pepis are even lighter, but have no idea about the durability.

https://singletrackworld.com/2019/09/pepis-rokkline-tire-noodles/

Reply

IslandLife
+3 dan_l JVP Cr4w
IslandLife  - May 19, 2020, 4:06 p.m.

I'm having a great experience with Maxxis EXO+ casings and Cushcore XC.  You should really try it out... might be the magic bullet you're looking for.  I think CushCore branded them as "XC" in order to not take away any sales from the "pro", but they should really be called CushCore Light of Trail.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 IslandLife Mammal JVP
Cam McRae  - May 19, 2020, 5:22 p.m.

While I haven't tried them yet, I agree with you about the branding. I had a beer with Adam Krefting from Cush Core at Crankworx last year and I made the point that if the Pro version works for Richie Rude, the XC version might be just fine for me considering he weighs 40 lbs more and I ride at half the speed! 

Adam is a purist and he believes the merits of the original system shouldn't be diluted. I think he resisted making a lighter version in fact. I have some to try waiting in the wings and I'm looking forward to it, for some North Shore XC. Or maybe XXXC

Reply

Loche
+3 Cam McRae James Vasilyev Jerry Willows
Loche  - May 19, 2020, 4:32 p.m.

I ordered some Rimpact Original (rimpactmtb.com) and should receive them shortly. They are very cheap (80$ for two inserts + 2 valves, including shipping and taxes) and lightweight (95g each for 29"). I've been running Cushcore in my rear tire for a while now, but was looking for something lighter for the front wheel. Apparently, they are fairly dense and doesn't absorb sealant.

They also have a more heavy duty version (Pro), which is a dual density version with a top layer that has some d3o-esque properties; i.e. non-newtonian.

If anyone shows interest, I'll update this post with riding impressions.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 21, 2020, 11:46 p.m.

Would love to hear your experiences Loche! 

Based on your suggestion, we have some on the way. Cheers!

Reply

ChazzMichaelMichaels
+3 Cam McRae Turttle Agleck7
ChazzMichaelMichaels  - May 19, 2020, 6:53 p.m.

I'd love to see a comparison of these systems versus a heavier tire with a soft compound at high pressure. Say Minion DHF Maxxgrip in DD at 30psi vs a lighter tire, harder compound, insert and 15psi. 

I'm sure there was a Pinkbike or article here with the tire manufacturers who said, they can make the perfect tire. But no one would buy it because of the weight.

Reply

JBV
+1 Cam McRae
James Vasilyev  - May 19, 2020, 11:01 p.m.

Schwalbe now makes the MM in 2.6 in SG. Seb Stott says it's the biscut, the lick as it were. weighs 1400 grams. i won't be finding out how great it is.

Reply

agleck7
+1 Cam McRae
Agleck7  - May 20, 2020, 4:08 a.m.

Exactly. And maybe not even at that high of a pressure, even 27/28 rear, 24/25 front. 

I’ve been loving the cc/exo combo (at 23psi f/26 psi r), but was surprised that running DD without cush recently at higher pressure was not a dramatic performance dropoff. It got me thinking that DH could be very similar for me as CC/EXO. if it is, I like the simplicity of not having an insert. Although the run-flat of the CC is pretty amazing too

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 21, 2020, 11:49 p.m.

Great idea. The tricky part is that this would require both back-to-back testing on as short a timeline as possible and weeks of riding on each as well. You'd need both the durability, protection results and the ride quality impressions, both up and down. The only easy part is putting them on the scale. Worth doing though for sure.

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Glass
0
Glass  - May 24, 2020, 4:45 a.m.

I am running an Assegai exo casing with the basic dual compound  with cushcore and am able to run it 14-15psi for normal trail riding (I weigh 60kg/132lb). I find this setup provides more grip than a softer DH durometer with a heavier casing sans cushcore. The grip on offcamber roots is mind blowing!

Plus it is lighter!

Reply

rwalters
+2 Reaper Cam McRae
Ryan Walters  - May 19, 2020, 7:28 p.m.

I can confidently say that the only reason I can get away with EXO sidewalls is because of the Cush Cores. Otherwise, I would probably be running full on DH casings.

I've pretty much always gone for the softest compound available - with or without inserts. I'm ok with swapping out my tires slightly more often if it means keeping all my teeth in my skull.

Reply

Reaper
0
Reaper  - May 24, 2020, 11:39 p.m.

Totally hear you on that one. I've taken to wearing a mouthguard for bike sessions that don't quite require a fullface.

Reply

RAHrider
0
Reed Holden  - May 19, 2020, 11:11 p.m.

Installing tires with cushcore should not break levers. I have installed enough tires with cc now that I just do it with my hands. You just need to make room around the rim so the bead slips over. Generally I install the tire and seat it first. Then I remove one bead and put the CC in and go about working the second bead back on. You can work your way around the tire pulling the cc aside and tuck the bead deep down in the centre of the rim. By the time you get to the last bit you can just finish it with your bare hands (that sounded unintentionally dirty).

If  you have trouble installing tires in general, this video is exactly how I was taught to do it. CC doesn't really make it much more complicated.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTAqUAPBfl0

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 21, 2020, 11:51 p.m.

Didn't I say that in my article? Maybe I didn't make it clear enough.

Reply

Turttle
0
Turttle  - May 20, 2020, 2:25 p.m.

For a Trail bike, I am still not convinced that Cush Core with EXO is a better setup than just running a plain old Downhill Cased tire. Especially on a 2.5WT casing 29'r wheel. At 95 kilos/210lbs I can run low 20's/high teens with a DH casing, and still have plenty of sidewall support for the conditions. May be not as good as damping as CushCore but still significantly better damping than EXO. Seems the trade offs are marginal until you take into account puncture resistance, where the DH casing is superior. Plus you can get Maxxis tires in DH casing in both Maxx Grip and 60D, Exo casing only comes in Max terra and 60D. Weight wise a 29inch 2.5WT Minion EXO weight 1075g + 260g CushCore = 1335g = Exact weight of DH casing Minion WT in Maxxgrip! Only 1260g for 60D Downhill casing Minion.

Reply

RAHrider
+1 JVP
Reed Holden  - May 20, 2020, 9:48 p.m.

You can get the Exo in WT in maxx grip.

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Turttle
0
Turttle  - May 21, 2020, 7:09 a.m.

Oh yeah they do in in the DHR model, not the DHF.

Reply

RAHrider
0
Reed Holden  - May 21, 2020, 8:12 p.m.

But I have a dhf max grip in Exo on my wife's megatower....

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 21, 2020, 11:56 p.m.

I think location is an important consideration for this, as well as body mass. Puncture resistance is also reduced with Cush Core because sharp objects don't push against the hard rim, but that sidewall protection is likely an issue. And 60D tires are of no use to us here, except when July and August are particularly dry. It always rains at least once during Crankworx, and the coast is worse. Solid numbers though for the right rider in the right location.

Reply

taprider
+1 Cam McRae
taprider  - May 20, 2020, 8:34 p.m.

Noodles/Liners can work for BC XC too.

Stans Podium wheel set:     1287g (29")

2 Pepi's Rokkline Noodles (the heavier enduro ones) with valves:  200g

2 Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.35x29 Snake Skin: 1540g

2 scoops Stans sealant:  100g

________________________________________________________________

Total: 3147g

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - May 22, 2020, 12:10 a.m.

That used to be me, but it seems like two lifetimes ago now.

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jan-meyer
0
Jan Meyer  - May 21, 2020, 2:27 a.m.

I’ve been riding ProCore and MM Super Gravity tyres for years and it has been magic, pardon the pun.

Recently bought some cush core but have yet to install it as I am experimenting with a Double Down Assegai on the front with no insert at the moment. So far so good as the grip of the Assegai is insane.

The Super Gravity Tyres are a great weight for serious performance option in my opinion.

My only gripe with ProCore was the valve which can get guncked up with sealant over time and require a disassemble and clean.

Weight appears to be pretty much the same between the two so let’s see what the performance is like when I finally get to installing it.

Note: DD Assegai with no pro core and MM with pro core is about the same weight, so that is why I am trying without insert on the front. The DD Assegai is very heavy, but damn it grips!

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Reaper
0
Reaper  - May 24, 2020, 11:45 p.m.

Keen to give the Tannus a hoon on the rear of my old DMR (maybe on the even older than old DH bike), just because it seems pretty legit.

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