EDC Banner
The Best Thing: Sea Otter 2017

EDC - OneUp's Slick Hidden Tool

Words Cam McRae
Photos Dave Smith
Date Apr 24, 2017

The question gets asked constantly. Walking around Interbike, Crankworx or Sea Otter, whenever we run into someone we know they ask; "what's the best thing you've seen?" Sometimes we have an answer but often we don't. It's harder to impress those of us who have been doing this for almost 20 years. This year the answer was easy: OneUp's Every Day Carry tool system.

OneUp started making a 42t cog that would sit behind a 10spd Shimano cassette, extending its range beyond 40t. The partners did it almost on a whim but the product caught fire. "It launched our company so we knew we’d be able to run with it but it also gave us a buffer of strong sales so we could sit back and say what’s next" Jonathan Staples, who is both an owner and engineer at OneUp, tells me.

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day2_theevent-8488.jpg

Here's a steerer tube cutaway showing where the tube resides on your frame. The green cap provides the clamping force - but we can't tell you how just yet. 

Everyone involved in OneUp is an avid rider so inspiration is easily found: "we have always just designed products we wanted to have on our own bikes." The impetus of this project was almost an accident, but it also came down to trying to improve a product already widely in use, something OneUp has a knack for. Jon saw a piece on the internet describing the world's lightest top cap. "I said ‘I can do better than that.' Why not just develop a single cap that performs the same function." 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day1_theevent-8399.jpg

Perfect for riders who don't like to wear a pack.

The resulting solution eliminates the star nut and leaving an opening where the cap and bolt used to reside. I can't tell you how this works just yet, but it is an elegant and ingenious solution. Jonathan continues; "we started making tools with the constraint that they had to fit inside this top cap and that’s where it ended up after a lot of revisions."

The gadget press-fits into the hole where the top cap used to be, securing in place with rubber o-rings. It's held firmly but also easily removed when needed. Staples tells us the tool is the lightest out there (for tools that include 2mm - 8mm Allen tools) weighing only 53 grams. In fact it beats the others by 50 grams. 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day2_theevent-8492.jpg

The system can be stored in your steerer or into one of OneUp's two new pumps. The pump is fully functional with the tool inserted. 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day2_theevent-8487.jpg

The EDC just slides in until it catches securely, held in place by an o-ring which also keeps water out. Just give it a wee tug to remove it, no tools needed.

There was only one tool that couldn't be included because of the constraints imposed by the storage position. "Something had to give and that was a Phillips head screwdriver that is on most multi-tools but I think we can do without it. Looking at most bikes, everything from 11-spd on uses Allen keys for limit screws and everything before that for Shimano uses Phillips but you can also use a common slot. The only spot on a bike where one is used is the free stroke adjustment on a Shimano brake lever. I don’t know about you but I never use it." 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day2_theevent-8486.jpg

The tool snaps into the frame to its left and then is covered by the tire lever, which also supports the chain tool. Then all three pieces snap together. 

What is included is impressive. There are 17 tools total and three additional features. I'll let Jonathan describe them; "We wanted a 2-8, we wanted a flathead and we wanted a Torx T 25. Those are what we feel are must haves on bikes. A T30 would have been nice to have for chainring bolts but with the move to direct mount those are becoming less common. But if you just need to snug it up you can use a 4 mill pretty successfully on a T30. There is a chain breaker and four spoke keys in park standards 0, 1, 2 and 3. We also have a tire lever. On top of that we have storage for a quick link, an included spare chainring bolt if you need it and either a capsule that goes on the end that you can store patches or a $20 and some zap straps. Things you would like to have on your bike most of the time but that you don’t always stash in your riding shorts when you are going for less than a three hour ride. The capsule is waterproof and will store small items to have with you at all times. There is also quick link storage for either two SRAM, KMC or YBM links. Possibly Shimano - I haven’t actually seen one of those to test it." 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day2_theevent-8484.jpg

OneUp was also showing new pedals, one aluminum for the US $120, and one composite for $48. And the Switch keyed chainring system that eases swaps and makes it possible to do the change without removing your crank. 

In addition to the tool, OneUp is making two pumps. They are small but they pack a decent punch. There is a version that moves 100 CCs of air with every stroke and a smaller one that pushes 70 CCs. The larger pump will store the entire tool, including the capsule or CO2 cartridge while the smaller pump will hold the tool on its own, tidying up your pack or it can be attached to your bike. 

nsmb_2017_seaotter_roadtrip_day1_theevent-8406.jpg

The carry for the pump requires bottle cage bosses. If you don't want to mess with your current head tube arrangement to store the tool in your headtube you can still carry everything on your frame - if your frame accepts a bottle.

The system is modular so you can purchase the pumps ($55 US for the short, $59 for the long), top caps ($25) and the tool ($59) individually. If you have more than one ride you can swap the tool from bike to bike in a matter of seconds provided you have the top caps installed in both. 

We liked the EDC system so much we decided to invent an award: The Best of Things Award. The boys from OneUp won a very Canadian bottle of Crown Royal for their ingenuity. We hope to get our hands on the system shortly so we can let you know if it lives up to the hype. 

You can't yet order an EDC tool but you can get on the mailing list to be alerted. OneUp expects the EDC to be available later in the summer. Hit up OneUp for more info.

Comments

shoreboy
+1 Merwinn
Shoreboy  - April 24, 2017, 4:02 p.m.

Ill be interested to see how they have managed to preload the headset bearings with removal of the star nut.  Im also wondering what the minimum steer tube length you need to fit the whole setup in?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Metacomet
Andrew Major  - April 24, 2017, 4:44 p.m.

It has to be an expanding insert in the steerer tube which then uses the cassette-lock-ring-like stem cap to tension the headset?

My first thought was an insert from the crown like the old Answer or more recent Chris King tensioning systems only hollow in the middle (instead of a rod) but the former idea would be much simpler to adapt to the huge variation in steerer lengths.

Reply

metacomet
+1 Andrew Major
Metacomet  - April 25, 2017, 11:46 a.m.

Yeah I am betting on it being some sort of a tapered and threaded expanding insert, and a tapered and threaded lock ring top cap.  Insert gets pressed in lightly into the top of the steerer tube, and the lock ring expands it ever so slightly and grips the steerer tube as the lock ring top cap is threaded in. Pretty clever.   Would account for variations in steerer tube wall-thickness from on manufacturer to another.

Maybe they can machine a tiny and thin alloy or plastic cassette interface tool with a hole in it for an 8mm wrench, so that you can still preload the headset in case it loosens up on a ride.  Otherwise you would be a bit SOL. 

I love the concept of the whole thing.  Seems like a fantastic design and execution overall.

Reply

shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - April 27, 2017, 6:08 p.m.

Just saw an install video on Instagram stories.  It comes with a 'star nut puller' and a steel tap and 'tap guide' to thread your steer tube. Uses an 8mm hole in the tap so you can use an 8mm hex to thread it in. 
Can preload the bearings with cassette tool or the edge of the EDC mult-tool.

Reply

xy9ine
+2 Merwinn Cooper Quinn
Perry Schebel  - April 24, 2017, 4:55 p.m.

I'd assume internally threaded steerer, but perhaps there's something less invasive going on. doesn't seem to be room for anything else. super cool bit of work, regardless.  non pack wearing minimalist me is in awe.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 24, 2017, 5:17 p.m.

Oi. Threading the steerer never even crossed my mind. I know preloading a headset doesn't require much torque but - ignoring the fact I can't see any manufacturers accepting it re. warranty and liability of modifying a steerer - you can apply a hell of a lot of torque on a cassette interface... I've seen enough riders pull starnuts out of their steerer tubes (tightening headsets without loosening stem bolts) I shudder to think what some dudes would do to their alloy steerer tubes tightening that down. 

Will be interesting to see how they did it!

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 24, 2017, 6:54 p.m.

Thin threaded collar that is bonded (green Loctite) into steerer? ID with threads needs to be bigger than tool but if you look at the size of the cap there's some room to play with? Green can easily hold the bit of force required to preload the headset but if someone reefs on it the inner would pop out without any damage?

Reply

cooper
+1 Merwinn
Cooper Quinn  - April 25, 2017, 12:53 p.m.

Also what I assumed. But @andrew makes some good points, it would certainly make non-shop installation a challenge too. No way I'd trust the average consumer to thread the steerer on their bazillion dollar fork.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Metacomet
Andrew Major  - April 25, 2017, 1:49 p.m.

The guys at OneUp are smart and I'm sure whatever they're releasing is well considered...

Beyond the physical act of threading the steerer my first concern would be that while the OD of steerers is standard (1-1/8" at the top) the ID is not. 

That potentially means having to have different top caps and cutters for different brands, models, model years, and potentially within runs? It also means staying on top of product changes over time of shipping the wrong product.

Then I look at the thickness of the steerer and think the chances of someone screwing that process up Is more than zero. Not hard to imagine steerers getting cracked in the process? A new CSU is expensive even discounting the assumption of liability in modifying the product. 

Really cool product; very interested to see how they've done it.

Reply

shrockie
0
Shrockie  - April 27, 2017, 9:50 a.m.

I'm going with Self-Cutting threads on the green top cap, like a tap..

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 27, 2017, 10:01 a.m.

@Schrockie the cap is alloy. If they were going to thread the steerer they'd need a steel tap. Likely something with an outside sleeve (like a good star-nut driving tool) to act as a guide. 

If the alloy cap was attached to steel threads somehow so it could self-tap there's be no way to ensure it's going in straight?

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - April 25, 2017, 2:24 p.m.

yeah, threading sounds like a headache. a thin expanding insert it is, then. a nerdly bit of design to pull that off effectively.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Metacomet
Andrew Major  - April 25, 2017, 2:31 p.m.

So Nerdy. I think @Metacomet nailed it above.  Also nailed it re. multi-tool has to include a tool to tighten top cap as well. 

Reply

cooper
0
Cooper Quinn  - April 25, 2017, 4:45 p.m.

That was my other thought: I don't carry a cassette lock ring took with me on rides. 

So I'd have no way to tighten up a headset unless they have (and they probably have?) done something clever.

Reply

metacomet
0
Metacomet  - April 25, 2017, 5:13 p.m.

I think they could include such a tool just above the o-ring, at the top of the whole insert.  Assuming the plastic/nylon is strong enough  would be built right in. No chance of losing it that way too, and might even give enough leverage to tighten enough by hand in a trails

Reply

metacomet
0
Metacomet  - April 25, 2017, 5:16 p.m.

God damn small screens.  Haha.  Pressed send accidentally.  

*trailside adjustment. 

Reply

Freerange
+2 Endur-Bro Cam McRae
Freerange  - April 25, 2017, 9:45 p.m.

What size hotdogs are compatible with the steer tube EDC? I'm tired of my weiners getting squished in my pocket while riding, this looks like the perfect solution!

Reply

shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - May 26, 2017, 3:28 p.m.

Just got the early access email about the EDC tool.  Total cost is ~$155CDN.  That includes the tool ($77), the top cap kit ($32.50) and the tap kit ($45).  Yes, you have to thread the inside of the top of your steerer to make this work.  Seems like alot of money for a multitool and tire levers.....

Reply

metacomet
0
Metacomet  - May 29, 2017, 4:48 p.m.

Man I am not stoked on the idea of threading my steerer tube, and the size of investment.  Ah well.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.

Trending on NSMB